Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Shocker ! Butters from different regions  are actually different but what are the  

  • actual differences between those buttersLet's find out, with What People Also Ask

  • Hi I am Shao. Welcome to what people also askFor those who don't know Google has a very cool  

  • feature called people also ask. When you ask  something on Google, it triggers an accordion  

  • telling you what people also ask about that  query. One thing you might not know is that  

  • it can actually be infinitely expended because  whenever you click any question in that section,  

  • it generates more questions based on the  questions you just clicked. So here's my plan,  

  • I would like to pick one term or phrase every time  and try to read through as much as people also ask  

  • as possible and try to understand..uh.. what is  about that entity and what people also ask about  

  • that entity. People also ask is one of my favorite  features because some of those questions and  

  • answers really turn your world upside down. It is  even more so when you are searching for something  

  • that you think you already know like you have no  idea what butter is, you really don't. So today's  

  • keyword is butter, Alright so i have read through  about a hundred of PAAs aka people also ask, and  

  • ...I just realized a lot of them share a similar  theme and one reoccurring theme that I feel worth  

  • addressing is that there's a lot of people  asking about why butter from different regions  

  • taste differently look differently and kind of  behave differently when you try to use them for  

  • baking. So, let's start with a very interesting  PAA asking why is Australian butter so yellow? I  

  • have never been to Australia so I don't even know  that Australian butter is yellower but apparently,  

  • that is a thing, that's why people are asking  about that on Google right? So let's dig into  

  • it a little bit. The answer to this question  was extracted from an article titled Battle  

  • of The Butter published by the Sydney Morning  Herald which is a daily newspaper in Sydney,  

  • New South Wales, Australia. This article published  in December 13, 2010, and what is interesting is  

  • that this article is actually not talking about  how good Australian butter is. It is actually  

  • talking about why European butter tastes better  back then. They also talked about how can they  

  • improve their butter production process. Howeverthere is a paragraph here answered the question:  

  • Why is the Australian butter so yellow? pretty  well. Here is a paragraph extracted by Google:  

  • Australian dairy cattle graze on grass with  high levels of beta-carotene, the compound  

  • that makes carrots orange and butter yellow, many  European cattle are housed in barns and fed dry  

  • food contains less beta-carotene. Wow so what we  learned here is that based on what the cows eat  

  • the color of the butter made from their  milk will differ. Who would thought of that!  

  • and it also opened another can of worms that  why European claim they have better butter all  

  • the time. I always think it's just European being  pretentious because... come on! Butter is butter!  

  • After I read through those PAAs and articles  now I understand it's not just European being  

  • pretentious. It is European being pretentious  because they actually have better butter.  

  • I think it's a good time to talk about another two  PAAs: Why is American butter so bad? and why does  

  • French butter taste better? Answers of these  two questions were extracted from an article  

  • titled The Real Difference between American Butter  and European Butter published by travelander.com  

  • an article titled Butter with A Pedigree. Ah, the  French published by the New York Times. The first  

  • article is very straightforward, it points out  that European butter usually have more butterfat  

  • content and is fermented. European butter  is often fermented, given it a tangy,  

  • slightly sour taste. These butters are often  richer (more butterfat) making it ideal for  

  • baking things in melts quicker. The second article  written by Dorie Greenspan who is a culinary guru  

  • of New York Times elaborate the difference between  US butter and French butter, especially the butter  

  • produced by Échiré factory in France. Here are  some excerpts from this article: By law, American  

  • butter must contain at least 80 percent butterfat  while the minimum for French butter is 82 percent.  

  • 2 percentage points may sound measly but since  butterfat affects butter's flavor texture and  

  • workability, every little bit counts. Most  industrially made American butters are not  

  • cultured and are labeled "sweet cream". Since  every butter contains about one to two percent  

  • milk solid this means that Beurre d'Echire... I'm  pretty much sure I did not pronounce it right...at  

  • 84 percent butter fat is only about 15 percent  water compared with about 19 percent in most  

  • American Butter. so we learned two things hereThe labels "sweet cream" doesn't mean it's sweet.  

  • As we know that sweet cream butter are not  sweet and I can't verbalize how surprising  

  • I was the first time I bite into sweet cream  butter and find out, oh damn! It is not sweet!  

  • Sweet cream butter means not fermented. There's a  lot of misleading naming convention in dairy isn't  

  • it. Like buttermilk, you think it's like a buttery  milk? No, it's very tangy, and it's literally the  

  • "un-butter" part that's separated from the  cream during the butter production process.  

  • It's an abomination. Sorry I digressed. Well  the second thing we learned here is that...  

  • uh ...European butter, especially French butteractually has more butterfat. Of course it tastes  

  • better, and also it's fermented. I'm not quite  sure it actually enhances its flavor. After I read  

  • through this two articles, I went to Stop&Shopand for the first time I skipped the generic  

  • Stop&Shop butter and I got an European butter,  I remember I got Finlandia. It's from Finland...  

  • not French, but anyway... And as much as I don't  want to admit it, it did taste better. So before I  

  • become even more pretentious, let's move on. Wellsince we already talked about butter from US,  

  • Europe, and Pacific region, I think it's a  good time to talk about butter from Asia.  

  • I want to talk about a butter brand that I have  never heard of before I started the "PAA Trip"  

  • -Amul butter. Let's start from the first PAA about  Amul butter, Is Amul a butter? It sounds like a  

  • very weird person at the first glance because  if something is butter how can you not know it's  

  • butter? If something's not butter how can you not  know it's not butter? But apparently there is more  

  • to it than meet the eye so let's dig into thatSo the answer to this question was extracted from  

  • amazon's product page selling Amul butter which  is very interesting cuz usually Google extract  

  • PAAs from an informational article, this is the  first time I found it extracting an answer from  

  • a product page.Here is the product descriptionAmul is synonymous with butter in India, several  

  • generations of Indian customers have grown up with  the taste of Amul butter for six decades, utterly,  

  • bitterly, delicious taste of Amul butter ismust on the breakfast table of almost every Indian  

  • household. So Amul is butter, without a doubtand it's very famous in India. But why people  

  • even ask that question? Is that actually tastes  that different from the butter some people were  

  • used to? The next PAA will answer this questionSo here's the next PAA: Why Amul butter is salty?  

  • The answer to this question was extracted fromvery interesting article titled How Amul become  

  • utterly, bitterly, delicious, and salty. This  article published in 2007 by The Economic Times,  

  • which is an Indian newspaper headquartered  in Mumbai, India. According to this very  

  • interesting article, people in India historically  have problems storing the butter in a hot climate.  

  • As a result, they usually would heat the butter  to boil away the water and precipitate the solid,  

  • making it a kind of purified border called  ghee, but then Britishs arrived and the army  

  • felt that its battalion needed butter and set up  Military Dairy Farm across India. By 1930, the  

  • company called Polson's had dominated the butter  business. However, Polson's monopoly provoked a  

  • local farmer leader Tribhuvandas K. Patel, I'm  sorry if I pronounced it wrong, to organize the  

  • cooperatives to compete with it, which would  later become Amul. According to this article,  

  • unlike Polson's whose butter was usually made by  stale cream, then processed to remove its odours,  

  • Amul only made their butter with fresh creamMilk to cream, to butter, all on the same day.  

  • However, people in India have become too  used to the heavily salted and fermented  

  • butter that Polson's produced, so they found  Amul's butter tastes flat and flavorless.  

  • So amul had to come up with a solution and find  it in a chemical additives called diacetyl that  

  • give it a required butter taste. They also had  to increase salt and add coloring to give their  

  • white buffalo milk butter the yellowish color  of cow's milk that people were used to. I used  

  • to wonder where can I get Amul butter. I tried to  order it on Amazon but it never delivered. Then I  

  • realized it's always there in the Indian grocery  store around my place, and it is actually made  

  • from buffalo milk which is very interesting, and  it actually tastes very different. I can't tell  

  • what's the difference, just very different... To  be honest, I like Amul's ghee better. It's really  

  • good. Oh did I just mention ghee? I think it's the  best time to talk about another PAA: Is butter and  

  • ghee the same? As I mentioned they are not but  what exactly ghee is? The answer to this question  

  • was extracted from a very interesting article  titled The Difference between Butter and Ghee.  

  • published by The Tasting Table, which is a digital  media company focused on food and drink based in  

  • New York. Here is some excerpts from this articleghee is butter minus the milk solid and water.  

  • During the cooking process milk proteins and water  are removed resulting in a butter-like spread made  

  • of almost 100 percent pure butterfat. So is ghee  the same as clarified butter, you ask. All ghee is  

  • considered clarified butter but not all clarified  butter is considered ghee, since ghee simmers  

  • longer and as a result turns the milk solid brown.  O h that explains why ghee tastes so good because  

  • it's like a condensed version of butter, of course  it tastes good! Well let's recap. Today we learned  

  • that European butter American butter, pacific  butter, and Indian butter are actually different,  

  • and butter and ghee are also different, and the  chemical compound that give butter its yellowish  

  • color is called beta-carotene, and the chemical  compound that gives the butter its butter taste  

  • is called diacetyl. There's another thing  I want to talk about, during my PAA trip  

  • I realized that there is a lot of articles talking  about.. um.. different butter from different  

  • regions. One pattern that I realized is that  almost all these articles implicitly or explicitly  

  • insinuate that European butter is somewhat betterIt's not just publishers from the United States,  

  • the publisher from Australia and publishers from  India also insinuate that European butter is  

  • somewhat better. (Does) that make european butter  objectively tastier or it's just that European  

  • culture is historically more dominant so we are  more prompt to think that their things are just  

  • somewhat better. So here's my question:Can we say  certain food is objectively tastier than other?  

  • Or when it comes to tastiness, it's just a matter  of preference? Let me know your thoughts, and see  

  • you later. Hi i just want to let you know it's  a good time to hit the subscribe button! I know  

  • you're questioning why you should do that, but  you know you can't always questioning everything  

  • right! If you are gonna question this right now  what are you gonna question next? Your life?  

  • Santa Claus? Climate Change? You know sometimes  you just need to have faith, so just do it ,bye!

Shocker ! Butters from different regions  are actually different but what are the  

Subtitles and vocabulary

B1 INT butter article european milk paa cream

What? Butter from Different Regions Actually Tastes Different! -What People also Ask?-Butter#1

  • 19 0
    羅紹桀   posted on 2020/10/27
Video vocabulary

Go back to previous version