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  • - Hello, my name is Andrew.

  • You might recognize me from the show Worth It,

  • where I'm usually tasting foods at different price points

  • with my pals, Steven and Adam.

  • In this video, I'm going to be making one

  • of my favorite things I ever had on Worth It, soy milk.

  • Not just any soy milk, but the freshly made soy milk

  • we had Liu Jia Suasian bao

  • in our dumpling episode in Taiwan.

  • Having that soy milk was a real holy crap moment for me.

  • What? - Jeez

  • - I didn't know that's what soy milk supposed to taste like.

  • I had never tasted freshly made soy milk before.

  • My previous experience was just having

  • the store bought stuff.

  • After having that soy milk,

  • I felt like such an idiot because I thought I knew

  • what soy milk tasted like, but then I had this

  • and I was like, yeah, of course there is great,

  • delicious, rich, tasting soy milk.

  • I think making this recipe will help me explore something

  • that I'm really interested in,

  • which is the fundamentals of why something tastes good.

  • Holy (beeping).

  • Soy milk is one of those food things that seems very simple

  • and singular, kind of like butter,

  • but it has this incredible potential for flavor

  • that is actually very nuanced and complex.

  • So to start off, I'm gonna be speaking with Ms Liu

  • and Inca, who was also on that trip with us.

  • So nice to see you again.

  • (speaking foreign language)

  • - Yeah, a long time no see, Andrew

  • - Yeah and Inca, thank you as well

  • for joining me on this call.

  • Inca, I want to start by asking you a question.

  • I remember when we were filming at Ms. Liu's

  • you were so excited.

  • Inca, how's the soy milk?

  • - I'm like almost done with it, (laughing).

  • I really like soy milk, this is really good.

  • - And I was wondering if you could just talk

  • about your experience with what you might find in Taiwan.

  • - Soy milk, I feel like in Taiwan especially,

  • it's just like such a common drink, you know.

  • It's like something that you enjoy by itself.

  • And also there's so much you can do with soy milk.

  • Tofu, tofu pudding, dried bean curd,

  • and of our most famous desserts tofu pudding

  • is made with soy milk.

  • - How would you describe the flavor of great soy milk?

  • (speaking foreign language)

  • - You know, you're shop has a relatively small menu.

  • I was wondering why it's also important for you

  • to offer this freshly made soy milk at this shop as well?

  • (speaking foreign language)

  • (laughing)

  • - Thank you again, Ms Liu for sharing with me

  • and talking to me.

  • (speaking foreign language)

  • - All right. So we've got our ingredients,

  • which it turns out is just soybean, water,

  • and then a little sugar to sweeten it when it's done.

  • Which makes me scared because my experience,

  • every time I've had to make a recipe

  • where the ingredient list is very short,

  • it usually goes horribly wrong.

  • I have to thank Ms Liu.

  • She actually adapted the recipe that they use

  • in her restaurant to a home version and tested that for me.

  • Oh, Oh God.

  • I mean, is it stupid to say that it just smells like a bean,

  • like a green bean.

  • God!

  • 500 grams of soybeans.

  • Our first step is to wash and soak these for six hours.

  • So here we have our soaked soybeans.

  • What's interesting is that they go from being balls

  • to being more of a traditional bean shape.

  • It just occurred to me that I have no idea

  • what a soybean plant looks like.

  • Hmm?

  • Yeah, It looks like a lot of other beans

  • and I've had edamame before, of course.

  • So I'm going to strain this water off.

  • Put this back in the pot here.

  • I'm now adding six cups of water,

  • and then we're going to blend these soybeans.

  • This is the part that might go wrong for me.

  • Ms Liu had a nice high powered blender.

  • I'm using my Stick Wonder again, so.

  • Also I haven't tasted a soybean

  • because I was doing some other research.

  • It could really upset your stomach, possibly hurt you

  • eating the uncooked soybean.

  • But you know what I just noticed,

  • these soybeans look like a pot of Yukon Gold potatoes.

  • Can we get a shot of that real quick?

  • It's crazy how much a single soybean looks like a potato.

  • Just kidding, that was a potato.

  • But look at these soybeans.

  • doesn't it look like a pot of potatoes from really far away.

  • Oh Come on, come on.

  • That was good, right?

  • Nice potato trick.

  • (blender whirring)

  • Ms Liu does this for several minutes.

  • So I think I really need to get like a fine,

  • fine grain paste inside of here.

  • (sniffing)

  • It already smells really good in it's blended state.

  • It has like a delightful,

  • like enticing frothiness to it.

  • Here we have our soy milk ground up slurry.

  • So Ms Liu has these filter bags that she pours

  • all of her ground up soybeans into.

  • I was only able to find cheese cloth,

  • but I saw other recipes using cheese cloth.

  • So it should be fine,

  • it also feels appropriate to use cheesecloth

  • because this method is very similar

  • to the method that's used to make tofu.

  • I believe the only difference is that you would use

  • a coagulating agent.

  • And making tofu is therefore a lot like making cheese.

  • Okay. (soft music)

  • It's actually really not pouring through as quickly

  • as I thought it would.

  • Oh, I overfilled my satchel here a little bit.

  • Trying really hard to get all this stuff out.

  • It's such a dense blob right now.

  • There's a lot more water to extract from here,

  • but you really gotta squeeze hard.

  • Now going to take these ground soybeans,

  • drop them into a side bowl.

  • The color is actually very pretty.

  • It's very buttery, so that was a third of the soybeans.

  • I'm gonna try to do a little less.

  • I think I'll have an easier time squeezing out.

  • So now that we've done the first squeeze,

  • Ms. Liu suggests adding another three cups of water

  • to the ground soybean to extract even more liquid

  • from this ground soybean.

  • (Andrew chugging)

  • (Andrew exhaling)

  • Give this a quick stir.

  • I don't know if it's just the sunset lighting over here,

  • but I'm finding this an incredibly relaxing experience.

  • Something about cheesecloth that just kind of conveys

  • a rustic cooking process kind of vibe.

  • Coarse materials are very cozy.

  • Okay we've strained our soy milk and now it's time to boil.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Welcome to the stove area.

  • So I've cleaned this second pot

  • and the next step is actually to transfer all

  • of the squeezed soy milk liquid

  • into the second pot.

  • And then I have a residue in the first pot

  • that's supposed to brown a little bit, not burn,

  • but just brown and then that flavor will impart

  • into the rest of the soy milk.

  • Most of the liquid has evaporated.

  • I'm starting to see a little browning.

  • I really don't want to burn this.

  • Mm, yeah, it's getting kind of

  • like a toasted popcorn smell to it.

  • I'm pouring it now.

  • (milk splashes)

  • Okay, actually supposed to use a whisk.

  • I'm gonna turn this down a little bit

  • because I feel the soy milk that charred

  • on the bottom is still there.

  • I see that there's some kind of like toasted solids

  • that are now kind of floating around.

  • They're also on my whisk.

  • I don't think that's too big of a concern

  • because we're actually going to put this through

  • the cheesecloth again after it boils.

  • Oh my God, (laughing).

  • Very nearly had a disaster on my hands.

  • Okay, the soy milk is boiled.

  • Pour the milk back through my cheesecloth.

  • So this seems to have taken out most of the charred bits.

  • And now just going to return this to a boil.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Okay, the soy milk is now boiling.

  • The last ingredient is just a little bit of sugar

  • to sweeten the deal.

  • Soy milk is often enjoyed hot, but I want to have it

  • as close to the experience that I had at Ms. Liu's

  • back in Taiwan, which was cool.

  • I'll chill it in the refrigerator overnight.

  • And tomorrow we may taste. (classical music)

  • I made a lot of soy milk, (laughing).

  • This is a, especially in this jar,

  • I kind of feel like a milkman.

  • Right, so I think there's not much else to do,

  • but to, you know.

  • There's a lot of condensation happening here.

  • I think it's just time to have some soy milk.

  • There's something very pleasing about a glass of milk.

  • Okay,

  • cheers.

  • Wow.

  • Tastes really good.

  • Hold on, let's uh, (laughing).

  • It's very good.

  • I think I'm very pleased and relieved

  • that I didn't royally screw this up.

  • But it was a very simple method.

  • It has a very pleasant thickness to it.

  • It really tastes like a full fat product.

  • So out of curiosity, I actually bought some

  • store-bought soy milk to do a side by side.

  • Way less fragrant in this store bought one.

  • The visual viscosity between these seems to be the same.

  • You know, they seem equally liquid-y.

  • Yet, this one tastes so much thinner than mine.

  • All right, so there's my soy milk.

  • I had a lot of fun making this.

  • Thank you again so much to Ms Liu for guiding me

  • through this process.

  • It kind of changes your whole perspective

  • on what a thing is.

  • All foods have a similar potential,

  • but too often we confine them to one category or use.

  • I think that's very interesting.

  • (happy music)

- Hello, my name is Andrew.

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B2 soy milk soy milk liu soybean inca

I Tried Making This Fresh Soy Milk I Had In Taiwan

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/25
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