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  • - [Narrator] There are a lot of different ways

  • to make a good burger at home.

  • I think it's important all parts of the recipe fit together

  • and complement each other.

  • Because of this, I think it can be helpful

  • to put burgers into two main categories:

  • thick-patty burgers and thin-patty ones.

  • They call for different techniques and even ingredients.

  • To illustrate this,

  • I'm gonna go through two different cheeseburger recipes,

  • one thin, one thick, both pretty basic.

  • Let's start with thin.

  • For the thin patty burger, I'm making a slider

  • with just a few less expensive ingredients.

  • First thing, I'm slicing up some white onion pretty thin.

  • For the bread, I'm using Hawaiian rolls.

  • They're very sweet and very soft.

  • I use two rolls, still stuck together,

  • and slice that in half.

  • For me, I'm just using regular ground beef that is 80/20,

  • so 80% lean beef and 20% fat.

  • You want a good amount of fat,

  • so you don't end up with a dry, flavorless burger.

  • I'm using an eighth of a pound, which is about 55 grams.

  • It's probably best to grind your own meat,

  • but we'll get to that later.

  • For now, I'm just using standard stuff

  • from the grocery store.

  • A really popular technique for making thin patty burgers

  • is to smash them, making it a Smashburger.

  • When done right, like this one from Burgers Never Say Die,

  • they're great,

  • but really doing them well at home can be difficult.

  • You need the right tools, and if you're using a spatula,

  • the edges of the pan can get in the way,

  • and even with two metal spatulas,

  • it can be tough to apply enough force

  • to get it to smash down quickly and form that special crust.

  • So when I cook at home,

  • I just flatten the meat before I cook,

  • using some wax paper and my hands.

  • Then salt and pepper.

  • Since the patty is so thin,

  • you really only need to do one side.

  • I'm using cast iron because it retains heat well,

  • which is good for getting a nice crust.

  • I start with the pan preheated.

  • I put some butter down and placed the sliced onions on top

  • because we want them to caramelize a little.

  • And then put on the patty.

  • It doesn't take very long to cook, only a minute or so.

  • Once flipped, I have the cheese.

  • I use American cheese because it melts really fast,

  • which is great for this, and I think it tastes good.

  • Then you have the buns.

  • I kind of mop up some of the fat from the burger

  • to help toast them up.

  • Adding water and covering helps melt the cheese faster

  • and it steams the bun.

  • I usually do this for about 30 seconds.

  • Then I kind of shove the onions on top of the melted cheese

  • so I can just pull it off all in one thing.

  • That's all there is to it: really just four ingredients,

  • plus salt, pepper, and butter.

  • Mustard or pickles would be a good addition,

  • but I don't think they're necessary,

  • and it really doesn't need ketchup

  • since the bun and the onions are both sweet.

  • You can definitely use a different cheese,

  • but it can be tough to melt it fast enough

  • not to overcook the burger.

  • Next up is the thick patty.

  • For the bread, I wouldn't use Hawaiian rolls,

  • since they're so soft

  • and don't really hold up to the weight of the thick patty.

  • Even most grocery store bonds like this potato one

  • are a bit too soft for this.

  • So I'm using this fancy bun I got at this place

  • that makes them specifically for their own burgers.

  • It has the structure I'm looking for

  • and holds up to everything else.

  • For cheese, I'm using cheddar.

  • This is a regular cheddar, but really sharp cheddar as well.

  • You want a good, thick slice to balance things out,

  • and since the burger is going to cook longer,

  • you can have a cheese that takes longer to melt

  • and use a larger amount of it, too.

  • This slice is about 40 grams.

  • We're gonna do onions on this burger as well,

  • this time, a red onion,

  • making thicker slices to get these rings,

  • which will go on raw for some crunch.

  • Now for this burger,

  • a sauce is really gonna help balance everything out

  • with the extra bread and meat.

  • This is your standard burger sauce,

  • mainly ketchup and mayo,

  • except I'm going to make the mayonnaise from scratch.

  • I'm gonna use one or two cloves of garlic.

  • This one's pretty big, so I'm just doing one.

  • Next, some pickles.

  • I like cutting up whole pickles

  • because I find relish is usually too sweet,

  • and since I'm adding ketchup to the sauce,

  • it really doesn't need that.

  • Plus, I can control the size of the chunks

  • and I like to leave them a bit bigger.

  • So in a large bowl, I do one egg yolk, the garlic I minced,

  • a bit of whatever mustard you want, and some lemon juice,

  • but just a little because we're going to add more later,

  • I whisk this and then start adding a little bit of olive oil

  • at a time.

  • I'm going really slow

  • to make sure to not add too much and break the mixture.

  • I like to start with olive oil for flavor,

  • but then after a bit,

  • I switch to a more neutral oil, like this vegetable oil.

  • I keep going little by little

  • and making sure the oil is fully incorporated

  • before adding more.

  • This can definitely go wrong.

  • If you add too much oil at once,

  • it will break apart or just stay thin and never thicken.

  • If it does go right, it should get thick like this.

  • Now I'll add some more lemon juice for flavor,

  • which also thins it out a bit.

  • I'll even add a bit of water if it's still too thick,

  • but don't want more of the lemon.

  • You can salt to taste and stop right here,

  • and you just have a nice garlic mail.

  • I like using this for BLTs or to dip potato wedges in it.

  • But since this is going to be a burger sauce,

  • in go the pickles I cut up and some ketchup.

  • You can do as much as you want.

  • I don't like adding too much.

  • This is about a tablespoon.

  • This adds a bit of sweetness, umami and some color.

  • I like to make the sauce first

  • and then keep it in the fridge

  • because it tastes better after sitting awhile.

  • For me, the whole point of having a thick patty

  • is to be able to achieve a good crust on the outside

  • while still maintaining a medium rare center

  • where you can really taste the flavor

  • and texture of the beef.

  • Since I want a medium rare center,

  • I really want good high-quality ground beef.

  • I'm using this freshly ground stuff from my local butcher

  • that specializes in Australian Wagyu and dry-aged steaks,

  • but you can always grind your own.

  • Buy some chunks of beef.

  • Chuck works.

  • Tasty and others recommend a mixture of chuck,

  • sirloin and short rib.

  • Cut it into small cubes.

  • Put that in the freezer for about 20 minutes

  • to get it cold and firm.

  • This helps the meat grind properly

  • and not turn into a paste.

  • Then you use a grinder that you also kept in the freezer,

  • so that's cold as well, and you just grind it all up.

  • And then this trick weighing and forming the patties

  • like this,

  • from how they do it at Gramercy Tavern for their burger,

  • it makes it really easy

  • and it gives the burger straight sides and sharp edges,

  • which I think looks nice, but if you're not into that,

  • you can just form the patty by hand.

  • Salt and pepper both sides.

  • I'm toasting the buns with some butter

  • before I cook the burger,

  • so they're ready to go once the burger is done.

  • I put the sauce just on the top bun.

  • Some people are really intense about putting something

  • under the patty to protect the bottom bun

  • from getting soggy, but I haven't had any issues with that.

  • I think if you're gonna eat it straight away,

  • it shouldn't be an issue.

  • I want medium high for the patty,

  • about three or four minutes, and then flip.

  • Add the cheese.

  • I'm doing a bit of water and covering it again

  • to help melt the cheese.

  • I go another three or four minutes on this side,

  • aiming for medium rare.

  • You could definitely add something green

  • or some tomatoes if you like.

  • I do think with such a large burger,

  • it can get unwieldy if you have too much additional stuff.

  • Even with just these onions and the sauce,

  • it's a little precarious.

  • It does really help to have some things

  • to balance out the beef.

  • An egg on top can be a nice addition.

  • Kiano founder of Jikoni, has a spicy tomato jam recipe

  • that's great on burgers.

  • You could do entirely different ingredients sets too

  • like a chili cheeseburger or a combo of blue cheese,

  • caramelized onions, and arugala.

  • So, thick patty versus thin patty.

  • Both are great,

  • but you really get something quite different with each,

  • and as long as you're aiming for what makes each best,

  • you should be good.

  • (upbeat music)

- [Narrator] There are a lot of different ways

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B1 burger patty thick cheese thin sauce

How To Cook A Thick Burger Vs. A Thin Burger

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/24
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