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  • Some two million people in the northeast of England are facing even tougher restrictions following a sharp rise in the number off new cases off coronavirus.

  • The health secretary Matt Hancock announced that mixing between households in any indoor setting, which people are currently advised to avoid, will be made illegal from Wednesday.

  • The region has already been under restrictions for the past 10 days, covering a wide area which includes Newcastle, Northumberland, Gateshead, North Tyneside, South Tyneside, Sunderland on County Durham.

  • The new measures mean it would be unlawful, for example, for people to meet in places like pubs or restaurants without anyone out with anyone outside their own household.

  • That's the crucial condition.

  • So for the latest weaken, join our north of England correspondent Fiona Trot, who's in Newcastle tonight.

  • That's right.

  • Yes.

  • From Wednesday you could be fined at least £100.

  • It's tough for the people who live here and it's tough for the local economy to was already struggling toe try to adjust to the curfew.

  • Over the past week, bars have had to close and even today one manager told us he's had to make people redundant, enjoying a drink after work and enjoying it while they can.

  • From Wednesday, Jordan and his friends will be banned from having a beer together.

  • For many in this city, it's hard to swallow tone.

  • I really, I'm told, because we want to try to get some sort of a nation, then fair enough.

  • However, if this keeps going on for a longer period of time, a lot more people going to suffer in the long run in the short run.

  • But at the same time it is hard and I do understand that people do.

  • Maybe that social last fight for people's meant well for my own mental health.

  • I do need that complete understanding.

  • Their lives are changing yet again.

  • Here in Newcastle and in six other council areas, they were advised not to meet it venues outside the home.

  • From Wednesday it's banned.

  • We will introduce legal restrictions on indoor mixing between households in any setting.

  • Mr.

  • Speaker, we do not take these steps lightly, but we must take them and take them Now.

  • This'll City makes over £300 million a year from the night time economy it was struggling to adjust to a curfew on the council, says today's announcement came without warning.

  • This announcement has been made without any notice whatsoever.

  • Toe.

  • Either us is local authorities or to our local police.

  • That's deeply worrying when it comes to making sure that we're all working together here.

  • Financial support to help with enforcement is set to be announced by central government.

  • People here say they will stick to the rules, but it's hard.

  • I think it's a bit contradictory.

  • I think, you know, like I've literally being a work today and I've stood with everyone and his dog at work, literally like so close to them.

  • And I can't go on standing me Dad's back garden, a kind of mix, not that much sense to may.

  • People are dying, so if it's worth sacrificing a couple of nights in the pub, then I'm not really that for us.

  • To be honest, this city is famous for its nightlife.

  • That'll that's being put on hold.

  • The challenge now is to keep people safe and protect the local economy, too.

  • Fiona Trot, BBC News Newcastle There needs to be an urgent review of the 10 PM closure times for restaurants and pubs.

  • That's according to Greater Manchester's mayor Andy Burnham.

  • He said the measure had led to people gathering in homes on that supermarkets were being packed to the rafters selling drink, for example.

  • Once the bars have closed, Downing Street says the policy in England will be kept under review.

  • A czar, health editor Hugh Pym, reports scenes like these in York on Saturday night have raised questions about the new 10 p.m. Closing time for pubs, bars and restaurants.

  • People gathered on the streets after they had to leave local venues.

  • There were crowds to in other cities after the earlier closing time here in central London on Dhere in Liverpool.

  • On they've been calls for the curfew to be reviewed after reports of people gathering in off licenses to buy alcohol.

  • Big problem with it, as far as I'm concerned is it creates an incentive form or social gatherings in the home.

  • What we're told by the experts is that that's the big reason the big place where Mawr transmission of the virus takes place.

  • But Downing Street said the measure struck the right balance between protecting the public on allowing pubs and restaurants to continue trading.

  • There's also a debate on new measures required to combat the virus.

  • Middlesbrough is not one of the communities covered by extra restrictions, but some feel they are now essential were probably a day away from being certain we will go to government on ask them for more restrictions.

  • We want to limit subject to Maurin for limit Thea Bility of people to visit other people's homes.

  • Three Mawr areas in Wales Neath Port Talbot Tor Vine in the Vale of Glamorgan have this evening joined the list of those facing tougher rules.

  • People can't meet other households anywhere indoors and aren't able to enter or leave the areas without good reason.

  • There are several parts of the north of England now covered by restrictions.

  • The highest case numbers, according to latest data, are in Burnley with 270 per 100,000 population.

  • Knowsley with 265 Liverpool with 252 on Newcastle with 246 per 100,000.

  • London's highest infection rates are a lot lower, with Red Bridge at 68 on Barking and Dagenham with 58 per 100,000.

  • London councils have now being designated areas of concern on a watch list drawn up by public health officials.

  • But some council leaders feel that the published infection numbers understate the true position in the borough of Hammersmith and Fulham.

  • They were running mobile pop up testing centers, but these had to stop when the units were moved to other areas.

  • Now the councils concerned there a rising numbers of undetected cases.

  • The government keeps saying there's enough testing for everybody.

  • That isn't our experience here.

  • People who want to get tests can't get online to book them on.

  • As a result, we have people, I'm sure of it walking around our Barra and all parts of London who were carrying the virus on potentially a danger to them, to other people on.

  • We just don't know about it.

  • There are now calls from some local authorities in the capital for the government to impose the same restrictions already in place elsewhere in the country.

  • Hugh Pym, BBC News While the prime minister has said for months that local strategies are the best way to deal with local outbreaks off coronavirus, but what is the latest evidence on how effective they are?

  • Our medical editor, Fergus Walsh, has been examining how well the strategy has worked so far since the pandemic took hold.

  • At first glance, life may look back to normal in Leicester, but people here haven't been able to meet inside each other's homes since March.

  • Unless they're part of a support bubble, you can only see friends in outdoor cafes, parks or other public spaces.

  • Lester was the first place in the UK to introduce local restrictions at the end of June after a sharp rise in cases they were tough.

  • People were told to stay at home and only travel if it was vital, non essential shops were shut for around a month.

  • Public health officials started going door to door doing testing.

  • It worked.

  • Cases fell by half in the coming weeks.

  • On in early August, restaurants, pubs and hairdressers reopened about a month after the rest of England on in early September, swimming pools on Jim's reopened.

  • But in the past few weeks, cases have started to rise sharply again.

  • There was a small increase in hospital admissions in Leicester in June, but mostly the trend has bean downward.

  • Cases have stopped falling, but a still way below the peak in April.

  • Very concerned that things are going the wrong way and that those case numbers we definitely need to get back down.

  • I think to some extent pleased at the moment that we're still not seeing that result in hospital admissions, but fearful that that's going to come.

  • And I think that's that's the key bit for me is how do we protect those that are most vulnerable to admissions?

  • Kathy Lee was the first local authority in Wales to be placed under extra measures from the eighth of September.

  • People can't enter or leave the county without a reasonable excuse and can't meet friends indoors.

  • Early indications are the restrictions of working with cases falling sharply across the UK At least 16 million people are subject to extra restrictions.

  • That's just under one in four of the total population.

  • The UK restrictions are not yet a Zdravko Bikas, those taken in France's second city, Marseille.

  • All restaurants and bars were ordered to close at the weekend following a surge in cases and hospital admissions businesses say it's a catastrophe.

  • The dilemma there on Dhere is how to control co vid without wrecking the economy.

  • Fergus Walsh, b B C News with me is WHO PMR health editor some very big questions tonight.

  • Here in two areas.

  • We're talking about a local strategies, such as in the northeast of England, on the question about whether that kind of thing could be imposed elsewhere on then.

  • We're talking about more widespread strategies, such as the curfew on bars, a 10 p.m. on whether that's actually working.

  • Now can you shed light on those for us?

  • We're here.

  • There are many threads to this.

  • There are the debates on local restrictions with these big moves in the northeast of England.

  • Barring any form of household contact in any indoor venue that is now being looked at is the possibility for the north west of England with a particular focus on Merseyside.

  • Ondas.

  • We've heard you've got council leaders calling from or restrictions in their areas, I'm told with London.

  • Despite calls for intervention there, nothing probably will happen in the days ahead.

  • The government of Westminster will look firm or data.

  • Then you've got the national issue of the curfew on pubs, bars and restaurants at 10 p.m. The scenes of the weekend of people gathering in crowds outside the mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham now says he doesn't think that's working on its own.

  • It needs a 9 p.m. Bar on the sale of alcohol in off licenses.

  • The government has said, certainly for England that it won't be further reviewed.

  • And, of course, Westminster.

  • There's a debate about the extent to which the state should be intervening in people's lives.

  • But wherever that debate goes, we've certainly seen today there are a lot more interventions and measures being put into place.

  • Once again, many thanks him there are health editor.

Some two million people in the northeast of England are facing even tougher restrictions following a sharp rise in the number off new cases off coronavirus.

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2 million people in north-east England face tougher coronavirus rules as cases surge - BBC News

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/24
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