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  • - [Narrator] Gordon Ramsay headed to Norway

  • to learn how to cook like a true Viking

  • But how this region developed some of its traditional dishes

  • happened long before these explorers took to the seas.

  • - I want to move to Norway.

  • (laughing)

  • (gentle music)

  • - [Narrator] Themi people are indigenous

  • to thepmi region,

  • which includes Northern parts of Norway,

  • Sweden, Finland, and Russia.

  • They're descendants of nomadic peoples,

  • who've been inhabited the region for thousands of years.

  • Their population today is estimated to be around 80,000

  • with about half currently living in Norway.

  • Despite the relatively small population size,

  • mi people have had a huge influence on Nordic culture.

  • And even in feature films like "Frozen II."

  • But one of their biggest influences is in their cuisine.

  • Traditionally, themi were hunter-gatherers

  • that feasted on in-season berries and animal-based meals

  • like reindeer meat and fish.

  • The meats were preserved through salting and drying.

  • Communal reindeer herding later replaced hunting

  • and became an integral part of themi economy.

  • - How many are in the herd?

  • - What's your fortune?

  • - I think Magna is trying to tell me

  • that it's rude to ask a Sámi about the size of their herd.

  • - [Narrator] Culturally,

  • themi people used all parts of the animal,

  • so that nothing would go to waste.

  • - Are they warm?

  • - Yes warm.

  • - That's amazing...

  • So you waste nothing?

  • - No, no, nothing at all-- - No waste even the sh--.

  • I mean, could you make them my size; size 15?

  • - Ahh, expensive

  • (laughing)

  • - [Narrator] Animal byproducts like hides, bones, and blood

  • were used for clothing, tools, and even other meals.

  • blood pancakes anyone?

  • - I actually like the flavor.

  • - Hmm.

  • - The texture is quite thick and dense.

  • - [Narrator] And now onto the Vikings.

  • The Viking Age started around the late 8th century

  • where Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish warriors

  • took to the seas to raid and colonize other parts of Europe.

  • to meet the high energy demands of a Viking lifestyle,

  • high-fat foods were a necessity

  • especially in winter months.

  • Vikings were comprised of independent farmers,

  • and when on land, they surprisingly had a good amount

  • of variety in their diet.

  • This included cereals, animal milks, wild fruit and berries

  • and a wide variety of meat, including horses, pigs

  • goats and sheep.

  • - This is a sheep head.

  • - How far does this date back?

  • - [9th] century.

  • - Vikings. - Wow.

  • Fish and fresh shellfish, like scallops were also staples

  • both at land, and at sea.

  • - I'm amazed how sweet they are.

  • That's a big shock for me.

  • - [Narrator] Like themi, Vikings were not known to let

  • food go to waste.

  • Domestic animals were first used as working animals

  • then later eaten which led to established delicacies

  • like sheep's head.

  • Boiling meat in stews was a great way

  • It helped a meal stretch and stay flavorful.

  • For example in a Viking Skause

  • meats and vegetables were taking out of the pot

  • then replaced with new ones.

  • This allowed the broth to be extra concentrated

  • throughout the days of cooking.

  • Also like themi, meat and fish were

  • often dried and salted for long-term preservation.

  • From the indigenous traditions of themi,

  • To the conquering spirits of the Vikings,

  • Norwegian cuisine and food preparation has survived

  • for centuries.

  • And while some of the dishes may look

  • a little different today

  • Their roots will remain for generations to come.

- [Narrator] Gordon Ramsay headed to Norway

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Traditional Norwegian Cuisine | Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/24
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