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  • I have a nice list of expressions Fraser, verbs, idioms, which you could use in your daily life and sound more like a native.

  • Let's go.

  • Hi, everybody.

  • It's me, your mate Elliott from E.

  • T.

  • J.

  • English.

  • How you're doing today.

  • These are things which I've written down while I've been living my daily life.

  • So, for example, whenever I speak to people, I'll take a mental note off.

  • Perhaps something I've said, or they've said, Andi, I thought, Oh, I'm going to make a video of just some daily expressions I've used in a natural conversation on here they are.

  • I have a few for you, and I really hope you find them useful.

  • The first I want to talk about is this expression pan out nicely.

  • We'd usually say, for example, something has panned out nicely.

  • So, for example, I could say that I have a new business idea on.

  • I could say, hopefully things will pan out nicely.

  • Maybe I have loads of plans for this future business, and I want it to be really successful, So I'm hoping if everything will pan out nicely.

  • So for something to pan out, it generally means for it to develop in a successful way.

  • But we often use the word nicely after just to add that extra kind of positive feeling about the expression.

  • So, for example, things didn't pan out nicely.

  • That means things didn't go very well, Okay, So usually we'd use this about something which we're doing, which we have plans for or something we did.

  • Which we had plans for on how it develops.

  • Does it pan out nicely, or does it not pan out next one pretty common expression here.

  • I'm not fussed.

  • So I said this the other day to one of my friends.

  • There were two options on the menu for something to eat on.

  • I just said I'll have either.

  • I'm not fast.

  • Yes, I'm one of those people who never really cares and make it really difficult for the other person making decisions for me.

  • So I just said I'm not fussed.

  • It just means I don't mind.

  • I'm not bothered.

  • So, for example, somebody says to you Oh, what did you think about the football score on the weekend?

  • Ah, I'm not fussed.

  • I don't mind.

  • I'm not bothered Now.

  • This is a good one.

  • I used this in my podcast My episode three where I talk about my working holiday in Australia and I said one thing led to another.

  • One thing led to another.

  • I want you to imagine, for example, let's say you've agreed to help one of your friends.

  • Let's say you agreed to help one of your friends, um, decorate their living room.

  • So you help to decorate the living room, maybe move some furniture in on.

  • Then one thing led to another on you were helping him clean his car.

  • How did that happen?

  • One thing led to another is like saying I was doing this.

  • You know, this was the beginning on.

  • Then after this time, I don't know how.

  • And I don't really want to share the details with you.

  • I finished off by doing something completely different or I finished off doing this, which is different to that.

  • So we started by helping our friend move house.

  • For example, Onda.

  • We finished by cleaning his car.

  • How did that happen?

  • Well, the details don't matter.

  • One thing led to another.

  • This then led to that this then eventually turned into that one thing, led to another.

  • I want you to give an example for me of a time where you might use one thing led to another.

  • Is there a time a story you have for me where you helped someone or you were doing something or you booked a holiday?

  • Maybe one thing led to another and you were doing something completely different.

  • Next one, get round to it.

  • Get around to it.

  • Let's say you have loads of homework.

  • Loads of university work that you need to do.

  • Andi, uh, you just haven't gotten around to it yet.

  • Or, for example, your mum calls you on, Says, Have you finished that homework yet?

  • And you say I'll get around to it later.

  • Get round to it means to start doing.

  • You haven't started doing it yet, but you will start doing it.

  • I'll get around to it means like I will eventually do this.

  • I'll get around to it later, or I haven't got around to it yet.

  • Very, very common phrase.

  • Grandma doesn't matter so much in this.

  • You could say it.

  • How I said it spread the word.

  • So the other day I was in a coffee shop on Bond, somebody, one of my followers Rodrigo from Spain came up to me and he said, Oh, hi, your e t j English.

  • Then he came and actually sat down, and we shared a conversation over a coffee with my friend Andi.

  • Then eventually I said to him, We were talking about E T.

  • J English.

  • And I said, When you get home, spread the word and that essentially means tell people tell more people.

  • Of course, I was joking.

  • I wasn't too serious or was.

  • I mean, I was kind of just telling him, you know, tell more people about E.

  • T.

  • J English.

  • Spread the word, Tell more people so you can say to someone Spread the word if you're in a business and you have this new idea again, for example, you could say to all of your team, we need to spread the word fast, and that means we need to tell people.

  • Make more people know about this.

  • Spread the word.

  • It's probably in a lot of your languages that expression on what if we want to take things as they come?

  • I love this expression.

  • I use it a lot, and again, I use this in my podcast.

  • The other day take things as they come.

  • It's actually quite simple, but it's about using this expression.

  • Do you think you'd remember to use this expression in a natural conversation?

  • Try and remember it the next time.

  • Take things as they come.

  • So, for example, let's say you have a really, I don't know.

  • Maybe something difficult that you're about to experience may be moving house or starting a new job.

  • You don't really know what's going to happen.

  • You don't know what to expect.

  • You're just going to take things as they come, wait for things toe happen.

  • You'll deal with the things when they happen.

  • I use this expression so much I'll take it as it comes.

  • We could say as well take it as it comes, which just means I'll deal with this situation when it happens.

  • Not going to worry about it yet.

  • It's a bit like saying one thing at a time, which is a very, very similar situation.

  • On those were just a few expressions, which I've simply used this week.

  • Okay, you can imagine how many other expressions I use in a month or in two years.

  • I could make a massive, massive list And don't you worry I will be making more videos with some of these useful expressions Idioms, Fraser, verbs, things which you can use in a daily conversation.

  • Because if you start using these, you will start to sound a bit more natural in your speech.

  • But of course, you need to get that pronunciation right now.

  • Remember, I am a pronunciation teacher.

  • That's my job.

  • I'm a accent specialist.

  • So if you need my personal help with your accent, you want to sound clearer.

  • Or maybe you want to sound British.

  • Then you conjoined my pronunciation course with the link below at e t j english dot com Not only will you have all of the videos, downloadable content and practice files, you can also send me voice messages whenever you want on what's app for my help?

  • Evaluation on feedback.

  • Thank you very much for watching the video today.

  • I really hope you enjoyed it.

  • Please give me a thumbs up.

  • If you did enjoy it and you found it useful.

  • Don't forget to subscribe.

  • If you haven't already take care.

  • I will see you next time.

I have a nice list of expressions Fraser, verbs, idioms, which you could use in your daily life and sound more like a native.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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A2 expression nicely led pan spread finished

6 Native English Expressions & Fluency Phrases

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/24
Video vocabulary