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  • Bo: Hey, guys.

  • Billy: Hey, Bo.

  • Bobby: Hi, Bo.

  • ♫ (lyrics) Flipping Physics

  • Mr. P.: Ladies and gentlepeople, the bell has rung;

  • therefore, class has begun;

  • therefore, you should be seated in your seat

  • ready and excited to see the difference

  • between a traditional and a flipped AP Physics C Class.

  • Billy: AP Physics C.

  • Bo: Calculus, sounds like fun.

  • Bobby: Maybe someday.

  • Billy: Absolutely.

  • Mr. P.: On your left is a traditional classroom

  • and on your right is a flipped classroom.

  • Really? We had to flip the word flipped didn't we?

  • That's just cheesy. (splat)

  • Okay. That just makes it worse.

  • (laughter)

  • Bobby: That's my fault.

  • I thought it would be funny.

  • Billy: I thought it was funny.

  • Mr. P.: Uh, no, Bobby, just cheesy.

  • Okay. So the difference between a flipped

  • and a traditional model in its most basic sense.

  • Traditionally, lectures are done in school.

  • Under a flipped model,

  • those lectures are instead done at home

  • via some sort of online video usually,

  • and the bookwork which is traditionally done at home

  • is now done in school.

  • Where the lectures and bookwork are done are flipped,

  • hence the word flipped.

  • There's more to it than that

  • which is why we have this video.

  • Bo: Mr. P., when were those videos taken?

  • Mr. P.: Good question, Bo.

  • Mr. P.: These two videos were taken

  • approximately a year apart

  • and cover pretty close to the same material.

  • We're going to now take a look

  • at the traditional class

  • and what we're going to see now is

  • a timelapse video of the entire 87 minute class.

  • So you're going to see it move by pretty quickly

  • and the idea here is so you can see

  • what happens during the traditional class.

  • (fast forward)

  • Mr. P.: Actually, let's pause

  • with one minute left in class

  • to show you the only thing that we did

  • in this traditional class

  • that was not lecture, one formative assessment.

  • What is funny about this is

  • that in the flipped class,

  • we actually started where

  • the traditional class ended

  • because the students had already received

  • this lecture at home.

  • In fact, in the flipped class,

  • we had time for two formative assessments

  • instead of just one,

  • and we also had time for a summative assessment

  • in the form of a quiz.

  • Bo: Awesome. More time for quizzes.

  • Bobby: Yeah, awesome.

  • Billy: I agree.

  • Mr. P.: Guys, remember that quizzes aren't

  • just for grades.

  • Quizzes also help teachers keep track

  • of what students are or are not understanding.

  • However, the main thing a flipped class provides

  • is time for the students to work

  • to understand the material

  • while the teacher is there so that they can ask

  • the teacher questions in a small group setting.

  • Because the teacher is able

  • to communicate with the students more,

  • the teacher is more aware

  • of the student's understanding

  • of the material.

  • You can see how in the flipped class,

  • the students are continually asking me questions

  • as I wander about the room.

  • Oh, and while students are asking questions

  • in the flipped class,

  • you couldn't see that in the traditional class,

  • I've actually rewound it,

  • so that you can watch me lecture, lecture, lecture.

  • Billy: That's pretty cool.

  • There's more time for asking questions

  • about the homework problems.

  • Mr. P.: Actually, we have to call it bookwork now

  • because it isn't primarily done at home any more.

  • Some of these students aren't just working on bookwork.

  • They are also working to finish up a lab

  • that we took data for in the previous class.

  • In a traditional classroom,

  • they would have to complete the lab at home;

  • however, because there is more time

  • in a flipped class,

  • they can ask the teacher questions

  • during class about analyzing the data

  • from their labs.

  • I found that this makes students

  • more efficient in their work

  • because they spend less time at home

  • spinning their wheels

  • when they don't understand something.

  • Notice that sometimes I did still need

  • to stop everyone and talk to the group

  • as a whole perhaps to cover something

  • that I thought that a lot of people

  • were not understanding.

  • Another thing to notice is

  • that the two videos were taken

  • from completely different perspectives.

  • The different camera locations are necessary

  • because traditional teaching

  • is more teacher-centered,

  • whereas, flipped teaching is more student-centered.

  • This is because traditionally the teacher

  • is standing at the board for most of the class;

  • however, when the class is flipped,

  • the teacher spends most of their time

  • with the students at the lab tables and desks.

  • One thing that you may not have noticed

  • in the traditional lecture

  • was that there was a demonstration.

  • Let's skip to that for a moment.

  • Now, there is a major difference

  • in the way demonstrations can be done

  • in a flipped class.

  • The students have already seen

  • the demonstration at home

  • and in class they get an opportunity

  • to see the demonstration up close.

  • They can touch the demo

  • and they can ask questions about it

  • in a small group setting

  • which is a lot more comfortable.

  • Also, we had time to do a second demonstration

  • in the flipped class

  • that only sometimes in the traditional class

  • we had time to do.

  • Again, this was because the flipped class

  • allows more time in class

  • for things other than lecture.

  • Oh, I also had some parents who watched

  • the flipped lectures at home.

  • This helped parents to know exactly

  • what we were doing in class.

  • Let's take a moment and just listen

  • to the differences between the two.

  • Again, traditional teaching

  • is more teacher-centered so you'll hear me lecture

  • most of the time;

  • however, flipped teaching is more student-centered;

  • therefore, you will hear the students being

  • actively engaged in their learning

  • rather than passively watching me lecture.

  • We can start with Ampere's Law

  • closed loop integral[ b.ds=mu not ] times the current

  • on the inside.

  • Okay. Let's see.

  • We know B is up.

  • ds is also up; therefore,

  • (students talking)

  • Mr. P.: In summary, the flipped,

  • Oh, really?

  • (laughter)

  • You guys had to do this, huh?

  • Mr. P: Oh, wait. I got it.

  • (laughs)

  • Okay, in summary, the flipped classroom

  • is more student-centered.

  • Students can be more efficient.

  • It allows more time for students

  • to ask their teachers questions.

  • There's more time for assessments

  • and in case you missed it,

  • the flipped class can be a lot more relaxed and fun.

  • I think everybody learns better

  • when they are more relaxed.

  • Bobby: I guess that's why I decided

  • to take your Flipping Physics class.

  • Billy: Me too.

  • Bo: Oh, all right. Me too.

  • Mr. P.: Thanks, guys.

  • It means a lot.

  • Thank you very much for learning with me today.

  • I enjoyed learning with you.

  • In case you missed it,

  • at FlippingPhysics.com you can find

  • a whole bunch of videos that Physics teachers

  • can use to flip their classes.

  • Please use and enjoy.

  • (splat, splat, splat)

  • (slurp, slurp, slurp)

Bo: Hey, guys.

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B1 US flipped class traditional bo lecture billy

Showing the Differences between a Traditional and a Flipped Classroom

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    張如婷 posted on 2014/06/06
Video vocabulary