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  • Not all heroes wear capes.

  • Some of them were callers.

  • And to these brave hounds, no task is too rough.

  • Here are five canine superheroes here to save the day, a certified avalanche dog like tally can do the work of about 30 rescuers in the same amount of time.

  • Their sense of smell is 10 times greater than ours.

  • And if someone is buried in the snow, we're not even buried but just lost in the woods.

  • The dog can smell their scent coming up through the snow pack and tell me where to start digging.

  • To find that person way are the first responders.

  • And a lot of times, if things go well and to our training, we can facilitate that rescue without putting anybody else in harm's way and be done quickly and efficiently and all Go home safely.

  • Way gotta find somebody.

  • I know you won't find somebody.

  • Okay, Let's go.

  • My name is Hunter Mortensen.

  • I'm a avalanche technician here at Breckenridge Ski Resort with my ski patrol partner Tally.

  • And we've been working here for eight years together.

  • We were really fortunate here breaking news.

  • We have six avalanche rescue dogs on staff today.

  • tallies.

  • Hearing with her co workers and friends is Boudreau, the golden retriever and a up another mountain pure bred mutt.

  • Three years of the big ST Bernard and Swiss mountain dog with the barrel under their neck.

  • Those dogs are built for the mountains.

  • They're sturdy.

  • They're hardy.

  • They could do it.

  • But what we're finding is they don't travel well in the snow, and they're not as fast moving across the snow and avalanche rescues all a matter of time.

  • So we're looking these days for dogs that are a little bit on the smaller side, a little more nimble in a little more quick mhm.

  • So the training we start him 60 09 months old and a lot of it is just basic obedience.

  • And then we start building from the obedience into actual hide and go seek type games on.

  • Then we build up from there and a big snow caves where we'll bury a person almost 6 ft deep.

  • If we have enough snow and then the dog will start searching, having to find where that sense coming up toe play the game and all they're really looking for is that person who they think has their toy.

  • That girl.

  • It's about two full years of training to take your last certification test for an Avalanche rescue dog and handler.

  • So I'm certified to work with Tally ready.

  • My whole last eight years of my career have been spent with her every day, all day.

  • When we have to do our thing, were really dependent on each other, and I couldn't do what I do without her.

  • And so it's an amazing partnership, and I'm really honored and proud to be a part of this program and and work with the dog like her.

  • Blakely has the most difficult job in Cincinnati Zoo.

  • He has to play with babies all the time.

  • He's never shown any aggression or snapped.

  • If he gets upset, kind of like any mom would.

  • He just leaves through u R E.

  • My name is Don Strawser, and we're at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens.

  • Blakely is a five year old Australian shepherd.

  • We got him from a rescue, and I use them in a nursery as a nanny or companion dog.

  • This is about you and you're taking a nap.

  • Blakely's here for the main purpose of teaching the babies the correct animal cues as they grow up.

  • So when they are introduced back to their own kind, they know what appropriate behavior is.

  • He teaches them how to play, how to interact.

  • I can tell him, No, don't bite me.

  • But I'm not an animal and I don't give the same cues that he can.

  • So we make a great team.

  • E.

  • Blakely has worked with cheetahs, ocelots, a talking, battered foxes, a warthog, Wallabies, to name a few.

  • He's working with four baby Cheetahs right now.

  • It's been a long seven weeks for him with these little Cheetah Cubs, and he's, I think, tired because he's on alert for 24 hours a day.

  • If they start making too much noise, he'll come and get us like something's not right.

  • Something's not right.

  • He's kind of like a second set of eyes for us to a lot of times they still recognize each other, like Dale to talk, and he raised when they see each other.

  • He'll Dale still run up front and grunt at him, and he'll kind of jump up on the wall.

  • And it's kind of like, Hey, how you doing?

  • Thank you Yeah.

  • Yeah.

  • Well, I like to think I have an office, but I'm pretty sure it's his Z.

  • World War two saw lots of heroes Winston Churchill Shall Diggle, Commander Eisenhower, but one you probably don't recognize is smoky.

  • Ah, Yorkshire terrier and the tiniest war hero of all time.

  • I feel smoky and I were destined to be together.

  • That's Bill Win, a corporal at the time and Smokey's owner, He bought Smoky for $6.44 during his time serving in the Pacific Theater.

  • I think that if she fallen in anyone else's hands, she would never have been what she waas.

  • And she was remarkable.

  • Smokey followed a bill through 150 air raids, 12 combat missions and once even lead bill to safety during a Japanese bombing.

  • Kaboom kaboom!

  • Kaboom!

  • Well, we look around, we got eight of our buddies, all wounded around were smoky, and I were.

  • If Smokey hadn't taken me there, I would have been standing with the other guys.

  • Good dog Smokey also accompany nurses on their rounds at a US Army hospital in New Guinea.

  • Smoky gets credit for being the first therapy dog on record back in Bills, hometown of Cleveland, Smoky became famous doing tricks on TV shows.

  • She could walk on a drum.

  • She could ride a scooter.

  • Smoky died a celebrity in 1957 but she wasn't for gotten.

  • She has memorials in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Australia, Hawaii, Tennessee.

  • But her biggest legacy Popular belief is that smoke is the reason that Yorkies are such a popular path.

  • So thanks, Smokey.

  • The World War Two dog for all those cute little Yorkies.

  • Yeah, in the peak of summer in Italy, when the beaches and lakes of full of swimmers the lifeguards keeping everyone safe bring in some much needed assistance.

  • Mhm, loser.

  • The cannon matching pure Saporito solo solo knowing So my solution isn't gonna keep it on a mechanic if you wanna keep us.

  • Example.

  • Son of a huge appealing Gasana president.

  • And that's another quality and a cannon.

  • Salvatore Joe.

  • And after a million of Trento Stanton over Cuando your president Terranova Anonymous.

  • This fella patient question.

  • Since then, food show has found that dogs make ideal lifeguard partners.

  • They remain common to pressure and instinctively choose the safest path through the water currents back to shore.

  • Once in the water they're able to keep afloat.

  • Both the rescuer and the person in need You is popular G e s p 07 30.

  • I say person can e she parla chica The vintage trying to sabotage Delano media meant Tianyou Lincoln the sabotage Um Ultima trait.

  • Oh, to keep up with these numbers, the school has over 350 certified rescue dogs and each year takes a new recruits.

  • After about 18 months of training, they learned how to jump from speeding boats and helicopters safely.

  • Among other rescue techniques.

  • Italy is the only country in the world that recognizes thes certified canines as actual lifeguards.

  • But the value of this is catching on, so the school is starting to expand abroad the day.

  • Can I have a dream possible?

  • E can buy.

  • Yeah.

  • Documentary defense of Padania presented canIs Domitien Delarosa complaints.

  • You bail like Well, look, the same kind of Padania moment of the sabotage.

  • Okay, Mission coin pew.

  • We saw a part about Cannon Romano six way as humans have always used dogs to help us get what we want and what we need.

  • We make amazing teams because we've evolved together and they make a massive difference in conservation by finding things that we couldn't possibly find to give us information to help save species are dogs to use their sense of smell to find everything from endangered species, too invasive species and wildlife crime, which is something we're really proud of.

  • Come on, guys, let's go for a walk.

  • I'm Meghan Parker.

  • I'm research director and co founder of Working Dogs for Conservation Wear, a organization that binds dogs from rescue situations, shelters or career change dogs.

  • We train them as detection dogs for conservation projects around the world.

  • Right now we're on the way from the kennel to the armory to pick up two new elements tusks and a leopard skin and a pen.

  • Gelman to train on.

  • We're training the dogs on new samples that might be finding scats of endangered species doing a population estimate, finding live animals that are endangered that are very rare, helping fight wildlife crime in Africa by having dogs find ivory and rhino.

  • When bush meat and guns and ammunition that air used for poaching this day, Mr Duggan was such a home gun, Foda.

  • They can detect microscopic larvae and water.

  • They can detect one species of fish in a moving stream that needs to be removed from the ecosystem before it harms more animals or plants.

  • You could imagine like, well, we could build a computer that would sense odors or a sense particles of some object in the environment.

  • Except we can't build anything that bind like dogs, air, actually the best technology and the best able thio detect something and then tell their hand there what they know.

  • Yeah, E started out as a kid training dogs when I was 10 and I just kept that interest.

  • I became a biologist.

  • I got my PhD studying African wild dogs.

  • This has been like a theme, I guess for me in my life, I do have dogs myself.

  • I actually live with three dogs.

  • Two of them are working dogs.

  • One is retiring.

  • He's on the couch.

  • I'm guessing.

  • Oh, they're both on the couch.

  • This'll morning.

  • We started to Lee Aren't endangered bat that she'll be working on.

  • It's really simple at first.

  • When she smells the bat, she sits and gets her toy.

  • It's gonna work 11 Yeah, it's going girl, do Dido on.

  • Then we moved to really complicated scenarios where the dogs learn to find the scent oven endangered animal in a very hard to find place.

  • Most of our dogs come from shelters and or from a situation where somebody can't keep a dog like this way.

  • Look at anywhere from 1 to 2000 dogs before we find a dog that makes our standards and can make it to the field as a working dog for conservation.

  • We're gonna run Utah on the Kicks Fox scat.

  • Is there anything particular you wanna work on?

  • He's Yeah, thes dogs have really high energy.

  • They want to play with a toy, and without a job, their energy gets misdirected into, like tearing up your couch or killing the cat or jumping through a window or chasing whatever.

  • So these dogs are really hard to have his pets.

  • But when they have a job and have a great home, it's an awesome combination.

  • I wear a lot of the dogs that I've personally trained.

  • I thought it would be really hard at first to have them live in another continent, but the care and the bonds that they have formed with their scouts and how hard they work in the kind of work that they dio when I see them.

  • They're working.

  • It's an awesome life for them.

  • Our work is important.

  • It pairs these two things I care a lot about which is taking dogs that air on death row.

  • And then they get amplify all this conservation that we care about, that we want to dio The dogs are making the world a better place.

  • They really are making wildlife safer in places where they work.

Not all heroes wear capes.

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B1 smoky smokey rescue endangered avalanche conservation

5 Tails of Heroic Dogs Saving Lives and Sniffing Out Crime

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/24
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