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  • It`s great to have you watching CNN STUDENT NEWS. This is our second to last show of the school year. I`m Carl Azuz. And I`m glad to bring it to you.

  • We`ve covered a lot of back and forth this week surrounding a controversial prisoner exchange.

  • In order to bring home Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl, the last American captive from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan,

  • the Obama administration okayed the release of five high ranking members of the Taliban.

  • Afghanistan`s former rulers who have ties to terrorists.

  • A new video from the Taliban shows the moments when Sergeant Bergdahl was released.

  • He`s taken from a truck, walked over to U.S. Special Forces who were seeing shaking hands with Taliban members, and put aboard a Black Hawk helicopter.

  • A U.S. senator says this video will likely be used as propaganda by the Taliban.

  • That group has called this exchange a big victory.

  • The Obama administration, which has been criticized by Democrats and Republicans over the exchange says it needed to act fast, because Bergdahl`s health was in jeopardy.

  • As debate over that continues, Randi Kaye looks into the history of prisoner exchanges.

  • Prisoner swaps in America are as old as the country itself.

  • Think back to the American Revolutionary War when President George Washington exchanged enemy prisoners for Americans.

  • This letter from the National Archives written by Washington himself lays out the terms of one such exchange.

  • President Madison swapped prisoners, too, during the war of 1812, trading the enemy for American military personnel.

  • Abraham Lincoln also traded enemy fighters for American soldiers.

  • Fast forward to 1962 when Francis Gary Powers, an American U2 pilot was released by Russia in exchange for a convicted Soviet spy named Rudolph Abel.

  • Powers plane was downed in 1960 during a reconnaissance flight over Moscow.

  • The two were exchanged in the middle of a bridge between East Germany and West Germany.

  • Powers family was informed just five minutes before the White House announced it.

  • In March, 1991 at the end of the First Gulf war, Iraq accepted the terms of cease-fire.

  • That led to an exchange of POWs including 35 Americans, which were freed in center Riyadh.

  • As many as 20 prisoners from allied forces were handed over, too.

  • Everyone on is a hero (ph). They look happy to be home, happy to be in freedom.

  • But what about an ongoing conflict, when the U.S. soldier is being held by a designated terrorist organization?

  • On that score, there does not seem to be any precedent.

  • Randi Kaye, CNN, New York.

  • Welcome to the Roll Call. Look up in the sky, it`s a bird, it`s a plane.

  • It`s Golden Eagles, the Ferndale High School Golden Eagles are watching.

  • They are parched in Washington State.

  • Over in Belle Plaine, Minnesota we see some tigers on the prow.

  • Hello to Belle Plaine Junior High.

  • And in the peach state, in the city of Griffin, Georgia, it`s the mustangs of Rehoboth Road Middle School rounding up today`s roll.

  • It`s happened before, a hail storm struck the woodhouse auto family, a car dealership outside of Omaha, Nebraska and people from all over called up looking for discounts.

  • The hail that hit this week was the size of baseballs.

  • It dropped on 4300 vehicles.

  • Company officials estimate the damage it caused at $162 million.

  • Police say 20 people in the area were taken to the hospital with injuries.

  • The line of severe storms that hit the nation`s heartland brought at least 12 reports of possible tornadoes.

  • Trees are down, powers knocked out, and flooding stranded some folks in Nebraska.

  • Severe weather was headed east last night, storms are expected in the Mid-Atlantic States today.

  • It`s been five years since the great recession officially ended.

  • This was the economic downturn that hit between 2007 and 2009, but it`s still having effects on people.

  • CNN Money says the recovery of U.S. jobs has been the slowest ever.

  • More Americans are using food stamps than ever.

  • Wages are rising, but barely. Is this all taking a toll on the American dream?

  • The American dream is this national ideal, the goal of prosperity and success.

  • But in CNN Money`s American dream poll, 59 percent of people say regardless of how you define it, it`s not achievable.

  • Young adults are the most pessimistic, they`ve had a hard time finding good jobs as the country recovers from the recession, and there are already concerns about the next generation, too.

  • 63 percent of Americans say that most children in the U.S. will not be better off than their parents.

  • The problem is that while most people are managing to tread water, that`s not translating into solid financial security.

  • But not everybody is onboard with these findings.

  • The Brooking Center says the American dream isn`t dead and that this negative perceptions are necessarily supported by facts since two major studies early this year show that the ability to climb the economic ladder hasn`t changed significantly over time.

  • I`m Alison Kosik in New York.

  • Time for the Shoutout. Where would you find the line Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink?

  • You know what to do. Is it The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Moby Dick", The Old Man and the Sea, or Seabiscuit? You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • Coleridge`s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, has this line about being surrounded by seawater, none of it drinkable.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • Of course, those sailors had only been able to desalinate that water, to take the salt out of it, then they could have drunk it.

  • The basic process of converting seawater to drinking water is ancient, but doing this on a large scale is difficult and expensive.

  • And the fact that more than 70 percent of earth is covered by ocean inspires scientists to keep on trying.

  • With California experiencing one of the worst droughts in the state`s history, access to fresh water has never been more important or more difficult.

  • Here in Southern California the largest desalination plant in the Western Hemisphere is being constructed.

  • It will soon take water from the ocean and create 50 million gallons of fresh water a day.

  • California is in a serious drought right now, and any new water supplies are important to the region.

  • We have a $190 billion economy in this region.

  • It`s dependent on water. The question you need to consider is what`s the cost of not having enough water.

  • Unlike, let`s say, water that comes from rainfall or water that comes from snowpack, we are utilizing what essentially is the world`s largest reservoir, the Pacific Ocean.

  • The Carlsbad desalination plant will cost approximately $1 billion.

  • The fresh water will be pumped ten miles underground to a regional delivery system.

  • Providing water to an additional 300,000 San Diego County residents.

  • Customers, they won`t know whether they are drinking desalinated water or not.

  • That`s right. That`s right. It will just become part of the overall supply.

  • Through a process called reverse osmosis, the plant will convert every two gallons of seawater into one gallon of fresh water, filtering out 99.9 percent of the salt.

  • The salt, or brine that`s removed is discharged back into the ocean.

  • The desalination process traditionally takes a lot of energy.

  • A plant this size would normally use as much energy in a single day as 70 homes in a year.

  • Officials at the Carlsbad plant say theirs will use 46 percent less energy.

  • The project is not without criticism.

  • Environmentalists point out that desalination requires a lot of energy, and that brine discharge can negatively impact marine life.

  • We are creating more marine (INAUDIBLE) in the south in the San Diego Bay to create new habitats where fish can reproduce there.

  • To the respect of the brine discharge, we dilute the brine with seawater before (INAUDIBLE).

  • The plant is expected to be competed in 2016.

  • And everybody is extremely excited to see this project coming on line and providing us with new water supplies.

  • Before we go, many of you probably felt like this this morning.

  • Wake up, Thor. You have to get up, Thor. You have to get up -you cannot lay down all day. You got ..

  • That`s all for the Great Dane wants to do. He`s dog tired.

  • To the puppy`s credit, this video was taken at 3:30 in the morning with his owners have to get up to open their bagel shop,

  • but no matter what they say, or what they do, Thor just wouldn`t Dane to get out of bed.

  • He finds just the thought of it alarming, or he probably dreams of activities like snorkeling or sleepwalking,

  • but if you ask him to live all that in his wake, he`ll probably just choose to sleep on it.

  • I`m Carl Azuz, a lash of the school year is tomorrow. We hope you are up for it.

It`s great to have you watching CNN STUDENT NEWS. This is our second to last show of the school year. I`m Carl Azuz. And I`m glad to bring it to you.

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June 5, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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