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  • from sleeping in an active volcano to climbing one with a disability.

  • Some people just don't seem to mind the heat.

  • Here are five eruptive stories that will melt your mind E have been skiing since I was four years old.

  • My name is Claudio and I ski over volcanoes.

  • E spent most part of a year close to the mountain when I spent time away from it.

  • I feel nostalgic, like if something is missing my soul, my life on in this moment, I take my ski and I go up.

  • E Mount Etna is located on the east coast of Sicily, eyes known as the tallest and active gun in the Europe.

  • The risks climbing Mount Etna are the same off any other mountain.

  • You have to be careful and respect.

  • What surrounding us with the view from the top is unique.

  • You can see the landscape changing many times from green woods toe desert volcanic area along the lava flow.

  • On the cost, black powder is volcanic sand and its former during the eruption.

  • It's incredible.

  • In upstate New York, there are two guys, creating some dangerous and risky explosions, all in the name of science.

  • This'll is Ingo.

  • I'm Ingo Sander.

  • I work for the Center for Ideas that studies at the University of Buffalo, and this is Andrew.

  • My name is Andrew Harp.

  • I am a PhD student at the University of Buffalo, the researchers studying large scale disasters, more specifically, volcanic eruptions.

  • Currently, we work on an experiment on explosive magma water interaction.

  • But there's a problem.

  • There's no lava in upstate New York, so they made their own.

  • They start with rocks, 50 to 60 kg of rock.

  • We melted in our fairness.

  • Things takes four hours roughly.

  • The rock liquefies and can reach more than 2300 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • We then pour the molten rock from that furnace into a container.

  • And into that container, we inject water on hope that the water interacts dramatically with our Milton rock.

  • It's almost impossible without being their toe.

  • Understand how much heat is put off by this, This lava?

  • I have to wear a Illumina ized suit jacket and kind of pants.

  • I have to wear that for protection from potential splashes on, but most importantly, from the heat radiation that comes out there, we want to understand better mark my water interaction and that actually occurs in explosive volcanic eruptions.

  • The goal would be to be able Thio predict exactly the size and timing of the reaction that we have.

  • I feel fortunate to be working with something that's so unique that it's only done in a few places in the entire world right now, and to be at the forefront of this research is great.

  • What may look like a beautiful green oasis is actually the top of an active volcano.

  • Located in Java, Indonesia is the collagen volcano.

  • At its top sits a highly acidic crater lake.

  • The water is 90 F.

  • It appears blueish green.

  • No species live in or around the water.

  • As the conditions are too harsh for nature to survive.

  • At night, a rare phenomenon can be seen.

  • Unlike any other volcano in the world, collagen emits what appears to be bright blue flames.

  • This blue glow is not caused by lava, but instead from a combustion of sulfuric gas is once the gas is cool, a bright yellow sulfur forms, which is mined and sold.

  • Miners use steel bars to break off portions of the sulfur and carry up to £200 back down the volcano theme.

  • It'd gasses are toxic if inhaled, making this strenuous work incredibly dangerous.

  • While this unique volcano may be home to one of the world's most grueling jobs, it is also a sight worth seeing.

  • When we think about volcanoes, we imagine these eruptive hot, violent gateways to the center of the Earth, and I spoke to a scientist who spends the night in them.

  • My name is Ken hymns on I'm, a professor of geology at the University of Wyoming.

  • Ken Studies, among other things, volcanoes.

  • And it's for a few reasons, but one in particular.

  • You could start the forecast likelihood for another eruption.

  • To get his research data, he has to spend time in them, sometimes overnight.

  • So we're talking about what it feels like to spend the night in an active volcano.

  • You're in a big crater.

  • It's spectacular.

  • It's This is like being in a deep, deep canyon.

  • Except for now.

  • It's circular all the way around you.

  • There's a lot of lake below you in.

  • The summit is above you.

  • Volcanoes have a particular smell because they're full of gas.

  • Those gasses air very so first, so they smell strong and accurate.

  • They also have assets in them, so they're toxic thing.

  • Air convey dangerous to breathe in.

  • You know, you oftentimes they're wearing gas mask, but it's pretty hard to sleep with gas masks and it's noisy.

  • It's echoey.

  • Typically, you'll hear has seen.

  • Instead of a campfire, there's an active lava lake.

  • We're looking at a lot of the Lakers, just phenomenal that way.

  • It's it's mesmerizing.

  • There's something about the red warm globe.

  • It's unworldly.

  • There's a lot to distract you from sleep, but Sims says, none of that matters.

  • You don't want to go to bed.

  • I mean, this is how the Earth's surface formed was from volcanoes.

  • And if you're in the moment, it's amazing.

  • That's so cool.

  • Way came together to accomplish a mission.

  • We will be walking around way.

  • Want Thio, show the world that with the proper prosthetic care and I've had a care, it makes a big difference in someone's life.

  • Oh, my name is Khan Story E.

  • I lost my leg back in 2000 and 10 overseas in Afghanistan, on with the United States Marines.

  • After my injury, I felt lost and confused a lot of questions of why.

  • Why am I still alive?

  • Why am I here?

  • Suicidal thoughts which made waking up every day very difficult.

  • Being active for me just became my therapy.

  • I found myself inspiring others and motivating others to be active as well.

  • Um, currently, we're in Ecuador, climbing for range of motion project, which is a local organization providing for aesthetic and orthotic care to countries who don't have the means to provide such care to their citizens.

  • Way have 10 to 12 amputees climbing high end volcano.

  • We all come from different backgrounds and all different injuries.

  • To be a part of such a team, to me is very, very important and it's very inspiring.

  • Someone in Kiambu from the refuge will take about 12 hours.

  • We have the equipment and the gear, but we have to be patient and wait for the right weather to get to the summit safely.

  • Whether we sell it Colombia volcano or not, it is just a small part of what we're here to do with this climb.

  • I hope others will learn a lot about themselves and their abilities.

  • They can do anything they want.

  • Thio, there is nothing.

  • That is impossible.

  • Hey, everybody, My name is Drew BB, and I'm here in my terrible home studio that I've made during quarantine, and I wanted to tell you about our new podcast called Great Big Story.

  • It's got Mawr surprising and delightful stories just like this one.

  • So head over to apple podcasts to Spotify wherever you get your favorite podcasts and download great big story.

from sleeping in an active volcano to climbing one with a disability.

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Skiing and Scaling Volcanoes, Like Mount Etna and Cayambe

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/24
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