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  • What's up?

  • I'm Ethan, your real life English fluency coach.

  • And in our last lesson in the Learn English with TV grammar, Siri's we learned all about the present tenses and whether to use the simple or continuous form.

  • Now, today, let's dive into the past tenses.

  • By the way, if you're new here, don't miss a single one of our new grammar lessons, just like that subscribe button and the button below.

  • So we can help you to understand fast speaking natives without getting lost without missing the jokes and without subtitles like Salima.

  • Who says that our lessons air helping them to speak English confidently.

  • Now Are you ready?

  • Let's start out by watching some clips and answering some questions.

  • Let's head back to Santiago's party.

  • No, thanks.

  • I think I'm gonna head home and watch the football game, which was ruined for me.

  • What's your problem?

  • Was celebrating Thanksgiving?

  • It's a sucky holiday.

  • It's always sucked.

  • My mom worked, my dad was gone and I sat at home watching football.

  • What tense does he use in these sentences?

  • Past continuous past, Perfect past.

  • Simple.

  • What do these sentences communicate with the past?

  • Simple.

  • A completed action in the past.

  • A repeated action in the past.

  • A sequence of actions in the past.

  • Yeah, right.

  • If you chose this option, you're right.

  • But these air also common uses of the past.

  • Simple.

  • We'll get into that later in this lesson.

  • Can you figure out what he says here?

  • How did you find me anyway?

  • You called me, said you were never coming back, so I jumped on a plane.

  • So I jumped on a plane flew across the Atlantic.

  • Canada isn't across the Atlantic.

  • You're talking nonsense.

  • Now when we talk about the past tense, this is when the famous irregular verbs come into play.

  • If a verb ends an e d, it's a regular verb.

  • If it changes in another way or if it remains the same, it's an irregular verb.

  • Let's now watch another short clip you to remind me of me and my sister.

  • Were you to remind me of me and my sister?

  • We used to fight all the time.

  • I used to accuse her of stealing my boyfriend.

  • She would accuse me of trying to stab her, you know, sister stuff.

  • Oh, my God, she says used Thio.

  • But if you chose, would that's also correct we're used to is not grammatically correct in this sentence.

  • Describing habits in the past is a big reason why we use the past simple, so you'll learn all about thes expressions.

  • This is what will cover in this lesson past simple, past, continuous used to and would be or get used.

  • Thio.

  • Finally, we'll test everything you've learned with a fun quiz at the end.

  • Let's start with the past simple and take a look at when We use it, the first uses to talk about completed actions and events in the past.

  • Let's look at this example in all three forms as an affirmative negative and interrogative sentence.

  • He had an exam on Monday.

  • He didn't have an exam on Monday.

  • Did he have an exam on Monday?

  • We usually specify when the action happened with phrases such as last week last year.

  • Yesterday, this morning, etcetera.

  • Everybody in the office bought me this clock last month.

  • I've been thinking about going back to school for a while now, So a couple months ago, I started taking a history class at the Community College.

  • A useful word to use in the past tense is, is just used with the past.

  • Simple.

  • It implies that the action was just completed recently.

  • High Way Just found this cat.

  • And we're looking for the owner.

  • Um, yeah, it's mine.

  • Hey, seems to hate you.

  • Are you sure?

  • Yeah.

  • It's my cat giving my cat.

  • My God.

  • Look, I just got a text from Robinett.

  • Says, Yeah, the next use of the past.

  • Simple is when we describe a sequence of actions of events In other words, a Siris of completed actions.

  • Example.

  • He got dressed and went off to the party.

  • I finished work, walked to the bar and met my friends with this use of the past.

  • Simple we often used.

  • Then I see what's going on.

  • This is about Nora.

  • You met a girl, you liked her.

  • But then you missed your shot.

  • And now you're trying toe hook up with your ex girlfriend to prove to yourself that you don't care.

  • We also use this tense for long term situations.

  • In the past example, I worked for that company for five years.

  • So of all the candidates that you interviewed today, who do you think I should hire?

  • Well, the interviews got a little off try, but I'd go with Simon Walker.

  • Computer science degree.

  • Worked for the Board of Ed for 10 years.

  • No way.

  • Lastly, we use This tends to talk about repeated actions or habits in the past.

  • Example.

  • I played the guitar when I was in my twenties before I got into real estate.

  • I worked construction.

  • You worked construction, stopped saying it like that.

  • I put 10 months of my life into this place.

  • I'd love to look around one last time before they tear the old girl down.

  • Things is similar to the meanings of used thio and would, which we'll see in this lesson in just a little bit.

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  • Way used the past continuous together with the past.

  • Simple in a sentence like this.

  • I was watching TV when he called.

  • This sentence has both the past continuous and past simple.

  • In the continuous form, we stayed a longer action that is interrupted by the action in the past.

  • Simple thes two actions are linked with when in this example this interrupts the action in the present.

  • Continuous.

  • I was sleeping when the baby started crying.

  • Let's watch some other examples.

  • His wound is obviously the product of gunshot.

  • You need to be honest with me.

  • What was he doing when he got shot?

  • I was so crying.

  • Tommy found me five hours later.

  • We use the present continuous for two things happening at the same time, we often use while in these types of sentences.

  • Example.

  • While you were making noise, I was studying or I was studying while you were making noise.

  • Wait a minute.

  • What do you mean you're taking over my job?

  • Well, while you were on your baby vacation, I was doing your job.

  • Haley Dunphy, Do you know how much I admire you?

  • Do you so much?

  • Why was working my butt off?

  • You are out there having fun, not worrying about anything.

  • Another use is for talking about repeated actions with words like always or constantly to express the idea that something is irritating or shocking example.

  • He was always listening to loud music.

  • It was not easy for me to trust a man after the husband that I've had this guy left Tools in the yard.

  • Let the kids run wild.

  • Great to see you Clear.

  • He's interrupting me.

  • The last use we will cover in this lesson is for unfulfilled plans.

  • With firms like Hope Plan, etcetera.

  • Example.

  • I was hoping to find a new job.

  • This means I didn't find one.

  • Hey, check it out.

  • Half packed suitcase Looks like blood.

  • So I was planning a trip until he got interrupted by someone or something.

  • Hey, if you want even Mawr grammar, Fraser, verbs, expressions and slang, then a great place to get that and so much more is over on our instagram.

  • Just follow us at real life dot English.

  • I look forward to seeing you over there.

  • Way use used Thio and would to talk about past habits that air no longer.

  • True example.

  • When I was a kid, I used to play with my cousins, My family and I would go on road trips in the summer when I was little.

  • How many years did we work together?

  • Way would get so tired.

  • We spent so many hours together we would divulge the most intimate details of our personal lives.

  • Right?

  • Right.

  • Like twins in a womb.

  • Right.

  • That's how we did this show, right?

  • So whatever it is you can tell may e beat up black belts.

  • Yeah.

  • How did you know there were black balls?

  • They told me after.

  • See, I used to run with a very tough crowd.

  • Street fighter types, riel, riel, bad people.

  • I'm just lucky I got out.

  • Used to Could describe actions and states.

  • Example.

  • I used to go out a lot when I was young.

  • I used to be busy when I work to pay for my studies, but would can Onley describe actions so you can say I would go out a lot when I was young, but you can't say I would be very busy when I work to pay for my studies.

  • It's worth noting that between used to and would, one is much more common.

  • The other Can you guess which?

  • Fuck my dad.

  • You know, I usedto s always tell him that I was gonna be environmental lawyer and he was always so proud of me for that now.

  • Used to is different from to be used.

  • Thio compare.

  • I used to go toe work by bus versus I'm used to going toe work by bus.

  • This is always used in the past to talk about past habits but this could be used in any tense.

  • If you're used to something, you're accustomed to doing something.

  • I'm sorry that Sisi did this to you.

  • It's okay.

  • I'm used to it.

  • This will just always be the fat kid with big dreams.

  • Notice that the verb after two goes in the I n g farm.

  • I've got to say you're handling this baby thing better than it wasn't expected.

  • What do you mean?

  • He's being the only kid in the house.

  • Now there's gonna be a new kid.

  • Jay's kid.

  • This expression could be used in the past, present and future with the verb to be again.

  • This is different from when we say used to to describe the past habit because there's no verb to be here.

  • You know, I used to be just like you when I was a kid.

  • I used to love it.

  • There is gonna be our best summer ever.

  • Might be.

  • Sheldon, are you going to spend a little time with Amy?

  • Oh, it's okay.

  • I'm used to it.

  • Lastly, there's another form that you can use with this verb.

  • We also say get used to doing something which means gradually become accustomed.

  • Thio, Let's watch some examples.

  • Look, you're gonna be doing this stuff for a while.

  • You're just gonna have to find a way to get used to it.

  • But none of you know what this is like being celebrated for something you wish you never did.

  • Oh, my God.

  • He looks like Shemp.

  • Yes, it is true.

  • But, baby, if I got a little bit more on the sides are No, no, no, no, no more cutting.

  • Just give me a chance to get used to it, Dad.

  • I came here to learn, not setting the bar and drink.

  • You do what you want.

  • I'm getting Scotch.

  • I'd like to play if it's just for fun.

  • I played basketball in school.

  • It was the first Thanksgiving Hannah agreed to spend with me.

  • And then at the last minute, she changed your mind up.

  • Awesome.

  • I was driving along the street.

  • The cars were parked just like this.

  • I'm boom out of nowhere.

  • He hits me.

  • This is exactly the kind of thing I was hoping to avoid.

  • You know, I was planning on saying no and making you beg for a few hours.

  • I just love you too much.

  • I would like to make a pledge.

  • I would like to donate $200.

  • $200.

  • Sure, I would consider moving in here.

  • Just let me think about it.

  • You know, when I was a kid, I would collect butterflies.

  • Oh, being adored.

  • I'm used to it.

  • Don't worry about it.

  • Cam used to be a cloud.

  • Be once a club, always a club or not.

  • Now, this used to be your room.

  • Pop up.

  • All right.

  • It's not here.

  • Not there.

  • Let me get this straight.

  • I called yesterday to try to cancel My reservation was told it's not refundable.