Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hi, everybody.

  • It's me, Elliot from E.

  • T.

  • J.

  • English.

  • Today I have a list of some very British words how to pronounce them, how to use them in context and, of course, what they mean.

  • Do you remember that?

  • Although these are very British words, in my opinion, they can be used in other forms of English, and you may find you hear these in American English.

  • I do find that these words in particular, I used a lot in the UK, and some of them would be considered to be extremely British.

  • And, of course, as always, Remember, the accent I teach when it comes to pronunciation is a modern RP accent.

  • The accent I use is very common in the south of England.

  • There are many other accents available and don't be afraid.

  • Toe explore and learn those as well.

  • If you prefer them, let's get straight into the lesson.

  • I don't want to waste any time today on.

  • The first word I want to talk about is one which people have been saying, Elliot, why haven't you taught this word yet?

  • It's such a common word in the UK, and to be honest, I don't really know why I haven't taught it.

  • The word is bloody, I guess I assume that all of you already knew this word because it's always associate it with the UK.

  • Oh, bloody hell.

  • You know, we say it a lot.

  • It's generally used as a curse.

  • Words will say our bloody hell.

  • Maybe when something bad happens or something annoying, we also use it as an emphasize.

  • Er, use it to emphasize maybe a feeling or emotion, for example, or that film we watched last night.

  • It was bloody good, wasn't it?

  • Pronunciation is interesting because we have the up sound which I find about 90% of the students, no matter where they're from who joined my course, tend to have a problem with pronouncing This sounds on the sound is, uh, most of my students pronounce it as ah, so they'll say bloody instead of bloody.

  • The key is moving the sound more towards the middle back section of the mouth, so pulling the tongue back slightly so the middle of the tongue slightly pulls towards the lower section of the mouth.

  • But we're keeping it in that middle lower section towards the back again near the middle and the back up.

  • Ah, try not to smile.

  • Just open your mouth vertically.

  • Bloody bloody!

  • Another word I thought I'd talk about is the word scrap.

  • For example.

  • The dogs are having a scrap.

  • That would mean that let's say I have two dogs on their fighting, each other a physical fights.

  • I could also say that my friend went to a club last night on Dhere got into a scrap with someone outside, meaning they got into a fight.

  • They were having a scrap, so it means to have a physical fight scrap.

  • Firstly, let's talk about the vowel.

  • A.

  • Another sound, which many students find quite difficult to pronounce when they join my course is the at sound.

  • Many of them pronounce it as a so they might say, scrap.

  • You will want to push your tongue forwards and down open your mouth nice and big and wide a.

  • A scrap scrap.

  • So with this continent cluster at the beginning, we're producing the sound.

  • Then we're cutting out it out with a stick stick, and then we're adding another continent, so a third continent into this cluster scrap scrap scrap so you can have a scrap with someone which means to have a physical fight.

  • But the other form of a fight could be a row.

  • Now a row is when we have a vocal argument with somebody.

  • So no physical violence involved.

  • Usually it's just involving your mouth speaking, shouting at each other, for example, my friend called me last night on.

  • He told me he had a really bad row with his wife.

  • Okay, so a row or to be rowing eyes to have ah, vocal argument row.

  • So, of course.

  • Make sure you can pronounce the sounds.

  • Uh, many of my students will say row or Lau because they have difficulty pronouncing the letter R so it would be useful to learn how to pronounce that continent on also the how diff thong.

  • We're starting with a on.

  • Then we moved to a round shape, uh, owl owl owl row.

  • Now another one.

  • I expect probably most of you know is Kupper copper.

  • Now, to have a cupper is to have a cup of tea is a very common expression here, For example, do you fancy a cup?

  • Er Kupper.

  • So here we have the up sound, which again were slightly pulling the tongue back.

  • We don't want cap.

  • We want cut on.

  • Also, we have a Schwab sound at the end.

  • So a a a a cup.

  • So we're practicing that up on the for the Schwann sound.

  • The tongue is more in the middle of the mouth and we don't really do much with the mouth.

  • So, uh, look at how my mouth changes cup cup.

  • So it's just a short way of saying a cup of tea.

  • Very common word here in the UK.

  • Do you fancy a cup?

  • Er now how about the word snark?

  • Snark?

  • To have a snog is too passionately.

  • Kiss someone.

  • This is a word which we use in the UK, particularly the younger people would say.

  • Oh, did you see them?

  • They were having a snog last night.

  • Okay, Snog.

  • You know, maybe Americans would say to make out right to make out with someone, we tend to say snog sound.

  • And then we're cutting it out with a no sound snark.

  • The op sound requires a round shape with the mouth.

  • 00 we slightly pulled the tongue back.

  • 00 Snog.

  • Snog.

  • Now, if something's a bit nuff Neff, then that means it's not very good, for example.

  • Oh, that food last night was naff.

  • Just meaning it was a bit rubbish just wasn't very good again.

  • Rubbish is a common word, but I've spoken about that in the past on this channel.

  • So naff just means not that good to the key.

  • Here is the sound again tongue forwards and down Ah, and then finished with a push your top teeth on your bottom lip on push the air around and through your mouth on it should be unveil iced naff naff That was naff.

  • What about knickers?

  • Knickers?

  • Knickers are the lower half of ladies underwear.

  • So the K is silent just like a knife or knackered, Which is another word I spoke about on the channel in the past to be very tired.

  • Knackered, but knickers again.

  • We don't say knickers or can knife.

  • We say knickers.

  • We start with a mm sound n tongue up against the top of the mouth and make the noise through your nose.

  • No knickers.

  • Now we don't want to say knickers again.

  • A very common mistake is where my students pronounced that it sounds as an eat on.

  • They'll say, eat instead of it, for example, so we don't want knickers.

  • We want knickers.

  • So the problem is that people lift their tongue too high in their mouth and kind of spread the cheeks too much and it becomes an eat sound.

  • You just need to slightly just slightly lower the tongue a little bit.

  • Hey, it keep the tongue in the top of the mouth near the front, kind of just behind the sharp edge of the top teeth.

  • Yeah, mhm.

  • So eat e neckers on.

  • We're finishing with a Schwab sound before the US US.

  • So we don't want knickers because that would be more of an American pronunciation.

  • Pronouncing the R if you're going from or of the Southern or RP British accent, you'll want the Schwann sound who's instead of Er's knickers.

  • One of my friends told me that he flunked his driving test the other day.

  • Now, to fluke, something means to do it by luck.

  • So someone might say, Oh, congratulations on passing your driving test and they could say, Ah, it was a fluke, meaning it was luck.

  • I don't know how I did it.

  • I didn't really do very well.

  • It was just luck.

  • I don't know eso fluke again Flow flow constant cluster at the beginning f and l flood top teeth on the bottom lip Push the tongue against the top of the mouth and flick it back down low flow And then ooh, ooh, ooh, Look at my mouth Ooh, I'm lifting the tongue backwards and up slightly Ooh, and then we finish with a fluke.

  • Fluke!

  • So that's toe kind of do something by luck.

  • And maybe if you flicked your test because you didn't think you'd pass it, you might be chuffed, chuffed, which means to be really happy and pleased with yourself.

  • So, for example, I'm well, chuffed is a common expression.

  • Well chuffed, I'm well chuffed.

  • So again we have the up sound.

  • We've talked about that already.

  • Um, off course.

  • You need to try and pronounce the cluster at the end, top teeth on the bottom lip and cut it out with a sound chuffed, chuffed.

  • So those are your words?

  • I hope you found them useful.

  • Remember, if you want to join my court, talk to me on what's app for feedback and advice and questions.

  • You're welcome to join an e t j english dot com.

  • And for the rest of you, please give me a thumbs up.

  • Subscribe, Andi, I will see you next time.

  • Cheers, guys.

  • Bye.

Hi, everybody.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 knickers scrap sound tongue mouth bloody

9 Very British Words & How to Pronounce Them

  • 9 1
    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/23
Video vocabulary