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  • Hello, everybody.

  • This is Elliot from E T.

  • J.

  • English.

  • How are you all doing today?

  • Great to see you again.

  • Now, today's English lesson is a little bit mawr about the way we speak.

  • Okay.

  • I want us to sound as much like a native as we possibly can now myself being a native English teacher on also specializing in the way we speak.

  • I think that I should be able to help you with some of these tips today.

  • Okay, So what we're talking about is connected speech on this connected speech.

  • This is just the basics, but it's still an advanced lesson.

  • Okay, so with connected speech, you don't really want to learn this until, you know, you're pretty good at conversational English Now, a lot of speakers, they sound a bit like robots when they speak.

  • And that's fine.

  • You know, that's because you haven't learned how to connect your English yet to sound more like a native on what I'm going to do is teach you the basics of this to sound more like a native when we're asking very common questions or answering very common questions in daily life.

  • Okay, so this is just the part one.

  • I'm going to be creating some future lessons about connected speech, and it's going to get a little bit more difficult.

  • So let's learn the basics right now about connected speech.

  • So, first of all, I want to tell you that we're not going to sound like the Queen, Okay?

  • I don't teach that.

  • I don't teach posh English.

  • I teach what I like to call normal English.

  • The type of English you would hear, Let's say 80% to 90% of the time that you're here.

  • Now, I have a more Southern accent.

  • People in the North will sound very different to me.

  • But we all do use this Schwab sound.

  • I've talked about the Schwab sound in a previous lesson.

  • Andi.

  • Now I'm going to be talking about how we use it to connect our speech.

  • So I'd like to ask you a quick question.

  • I think now think about how I say this question.

  • Then I'm going to slow it down, and then I'm gonna teach you how to sound like me.

  • What's your name?

  • What's your name now?

  • Did you notice the way that I asked that question?

  • It almost became one word this group of words became most one word on the reason why we do this is because if you want, you can call us native speakers.

  • Quite lazy.

  • We like to connect our words on.

  • Let things out quickly when we're talking fast, asking normal questions.

  • It sounds very normal to us if we connect our words.

  • So the word you often becomes Yeah.

  • What's your name?

  • What's your name?

  • What's your name?

  • Remember the Internation in this?

  • How?

  • I'm asking my question as well.

  • What's your name?

  • Okay.

  • We need it to sound like a question.

  • Intonation in questions is something else I'm going to explain in a different video today.

  • We're just focusing on this connected speech.

  • So just think about how it becomes from what's your name to what's your name?

  • Now to practice this practice going What?

  • CIA?

  • What's Yeah, what's your name?

  • And if you can't do that practice going.

  • What's Yeah, name?

  • What's Yeah.

  • Name?

  • What's your name?

  • Keep going faster.

  • Okay.

  • So let me ask you another question.

  • What do you do?

  • What do you do?

  • So now we've kind of got like a, uh Do you do you once again the u becomes a Schwab.

  • So is this a common trend that starting to happen now?

  • Yes.

  • It is changed that the EU is starting to change it.

  • Zad ing a sua sound Because the Schwab is our British sound.

  • Americans won't really use this.

  • Schwab.

  • They would probably say, What's your name?

  • But we say, What's your name?

  • What do you do?

  • Okay, so think about that.

  • If you want to sound British, Schwab is your friend and you have to learn it.

  • Let's practice this one.

  • What do you do?

  • What do you do?

  • What do you do?

  • Okay, what do you do on the question?

  • What do you do if you didn't know, It means What do you do for a living?

  • Do you work?

  • Do you go to school?

  • Do you study on?

  • It's a very, very, very common small talk question that we'd be asked maybe at the start of a conversation when we meet somebody.

  • So let's just go through a few more really quickly notice the Schwab sound.

  • Notice how I make this sound on.

  • Let's see if you can do it to practice with me.

  • Where do you live?

  • Where do you live?

  • Where do you live?

  • Where do you live?

  • Why'd you do that?

  • Why did you do that?

  • Why did you do that?

  • Why'd you do that?

  • Or we could say, Why did you do that?

  • There's a lot of why did you do that?

  • You know, there's a lot of these.

  • So let's probably stick with the Why'd you do that?

  • So it almost is like a job.

  • Just why did you do that?

  • Why'd you do that?

  • You see, so we can play around with this, But these are the kind of basics off it, and you'll pick up most of this.

  • Okay, You will pick up most of this if you watch TV.

  • If you listen to the news.

  • If you listen to people speaking English, OK?

  • Because it's so common, this kind of you becoming a sua on.

  • That's the basics of what I'm teaching today.

  • We will move on to the more advanced stuff in the future.

  • This is just the beginning.

  • I want to talk about one phrase that has way too many teas in it.

  • And it's a question.

  • What do you want to do today?

  • What do you want to do today?

  • Why don't we just make it a bit more natural and easier?

  • What do you want to do today?

  • What do you wanna do today?

  • What do you want to do today?

  • You see how we've linked a lot of different words there added a schwein there and it sounds perfect.

  • Okay, It sounds British.

  • And that's what we want not What do you want to do today?

  • Too many Thio.

  • You know we want to make that.

  • Schwab.

  • We want to make it sound beautiful on British.

  • That's that for you.

  • If you have already written down these phrases so you can practice them.

  • Good.

  • If no, I recommend you watch the video again on write down all of these phrases practice using them.

  • Practice doing it.

  • Andi, this will really make your speech sound more British.

  • Because I know some of you really want to sound British and you really want to improve your Internation.

  • Okay.

  • And this is the way to work it.

  • If you want to sound more natural when you speak unless, like a robot, then you want to connect your speech.

  • Okay, So I hope you enjoyed this video.

  • Guys, don't forget.

  • If you want to book a Skype lesson with me.

  • Just go and go into the description box below and click the link.

  • And I can help you improve your English speaking today.

  • Or if you want to pass the aisles exam, I can help you with that too.

  • Thank you very much for watching.

  • Please give me a big thumbs up.

  • The more thumbs up we get, the more likely I'll do a part.

  • Two of this connected speech.

  • Cheers, guys.

  • Thank you very much.

  • And I will see you all in the next lesson.

  • Bye.

Hello, everybody.

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A2 sound connected speech schwab speech connected practice

Connected Speech - SCHWA Sound (British Pronunciation Lesson)

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/23
Video vocabulary