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  • - As a hostage negotiator,

  • I've worked a lot of situations where people

  • were held against their will by some very dangerous people.

  • - [Narrator] Today Rod is going to break down

  • hostage scenes in movies to determine

  • what Hollywood gets right and wrong.

  • [intense mystery music]

  • [police sirens wail over the TV]

  • - What Hollywood uses for entertainment

  • is a real-life tragedy for other people.

  • So, to keep in mind that these are probably

  • the most serious and most dangerous situations ever,

  • and it's a very intense job.

  • [TV static]

  • - [Rod] First up, "Dog Day Afternoon."

  • In this scene, a hostage-taker negotiates

  • with police.

  • - Okay well I'll come over there without a gun,

  • you can frisk me so you can see you can trust me

  • so we can talk and find a way out of this mess.

  • - Right.

  • - A hostage negotiator will always

  • talk from a safe distance,

  • and would never go inside a scene.

  • But if he did, it would never be without a firearm.

  • He would become a hostage at that point.

  • [radio chatter]

  • - Hey! Don't fire!

  • Don't fire!

  • - What are you doing? That's a hostage!

  • [multiple people yelling]

  • - [Radio] Don't fire, don't fire! Hold fire!

  • - [Moretti] Don't touch him! That's our plan!

  • - We voted to send him out!

  • He's one of the hostages!

  • - Get away from him! What's the matter with you?

  • - In situations that are tense like this,

  • there's always a possibility for miscommunication.

  • That's clearly what happened here.

  • The hostage-taker said he only had women.

  • - How about giving us a woman?

  • - No, I got women, that's all I got here.

  • - But he sent out a man and the police

  • weren't sure whether or not that man

  • was a hostage taker or a criminal.

  • So they immediately rushed him.

  • That's common.

  • It's common when signals get crossed or mixed up

  • and it's hard to distinguish who's the good guy

  • or who's the bad guy.

  • - Now wait a minute, Sonny,

  • Sonny, that wasn't your fault, Sonny,

  • you know that we had a communication set up here.

  • We haven't got it set up properly,

  • we got 250 cops here.

  • They don't know what the fuck is going on in there.

  • - You almost killed him are you crazy?

  • - Clearly he's using the woman as a human shield.

  • Human shields are not used very often.

  • But in this case he was trying to limit

  • his exposure to police.

  • And if they were to try to snipe him,

  • or take him out,

  • he'd have another person as cover.

  • - Come on out and frisk me.

  • You can tell.

  • Huh?

  • Come on.

  • - [Hostage Taker] So what do you want me to come out for?

  • - Come on, why don't you come out and look at something.

  • Come on.

  • I want you to see what you're up against.

  • - I can see you.

  • What do I gotta come out for?

  • - [Negotiator] I want you to come out

  • and see it all, all right?

  • - In a real life scenario,

  • there would be a command center

  • and there would be one person calling the shots

  • and everybody else kind of provide the support role.

  • This is just chaos.

  • And I think it's great for cinema

  • but in real life it would never happen.

  • [television static]

  • Next up, Captain Phillips.

  • In this scene, the Navy has been sent in

  • to check on the well being of a hostage

  • that has been taken by some Somalian terrorists.

  • [shouting in foreign language]

  • [terrorists shout in foreign language]

  • - Guns down!

  • Americans guns down!

  • [shouting in foreign language]

  • - Put your guns down now.

  • - So this is based off a true story

  • so it's pretty accurate.

  • What they're doing is they're gathering intel.

  • So you'll see in this scene,

  • where there's a camera,

  • and there's a lot of surveillance type equipment there.

  • That's for the Navy to find out

  • what the layout is

  • and how they can actually approach

  • and attack this vessel.

  • - Does my family know where I am?

  • - Yes, [audio unclear]

  • - [Hostage] It's important they

  • know where I am.

  • I'm in seat 15.

  • You understand?

  • - What was really interesting

  • was when the captain told the Navy

  • where he was sitting.

  • And the reason he said that is because

  • anyone anywhere else in that boat

  • could be taken out

  • he just wanted them to know where he was.

  • [speaking in foreign language]

  • - Where is the money?

  • I don't want your food,

  • I want your money.

  • - Maintain camera footage.

  • - Hold on a second.

  • - Ten million dollars.

  • Ten million dollars.

  • [speaking in foreign language]

  • [shouting in foreign language]

  • - So the reason you're not seeing

  • a lot of time taken a lot of negotiation going on

  • is because it's really more of a strategic plan

  • to find out where they are

  • and how to strike and attack.

  • The thing to keep in mind

  • is that America does not negotiate

  • with terrorists or hostage takers.

  • And that's just a matter of national policy.

  • [television static]

  • Next up, Airheads.

  • [knocks on door]

  • - Who are you?

  • - Chris Moore, Capital Records, ANR.

  • Come on, let me in.

  • - [Rod] In this scene, law enforcement

  • tries to negotiate with criminals

  • who have overtaken a radio station.

  • - The cops told me you guys are looking

  • for a record contract.

  • There's something going on here

  • we gotta take immediate advantage of, guys.

  • Come on, let's talk, huh?

  • - It's pretty common for law enforcement

  • to come up with a different ruse

  • to try to make something happen.

  • But one thing law enforcement would never do

  • is send in a civilian or someone

  • into a hostage taker's domain.

  • It's just not gonna happen.

  • Hostage takers are unpredictable.

  • And one thing we don't want to do

  • is expose anybody to any danger.

  • - All right, let me ask you a question.

  • What side you take in the big

  • David Lee Roth Van Halen split?

  • - What do you mean?

  • - What kind of question is that?

  • - What side did you take?

  • Halen or Roth?

  • - Van Halen.

  • - He's a cop.

  • - Clearly this guy is a cop

  • and not a music professional

  • because everyone knows that

  • David Lee Roth was Van Halen.

  • The problem with using a ruse

  • or some sort of undercover officer

  • is being found out.

  • Once you're found out,

  • then you probably made an irreversible mistake.

  • The hostage takers will no longer

  • have any trust or respect

  • and that makes the situation a lot more hazardous.

  • - You put the power back on.

  • - No, I'm not gonna do that, Chaz,

  • I'm drawing the line there.

  • - In hostage situations,

  • sometimes utilities are turned off

  • to make the person inside uncomfortable.

  • Turning them back on is probably never gonna happen.

  • Regardless of the situation.

  • It's just not gonna happen.

  • We make them cold, dark, off guard,

  • want them to be a little hungry.

  • Put them in desperate situations.

  • - Is everyone having a good time tonight?

  • [crowd cheers]

  • Now, you wanna let the cops shut this party down?

  • [crowd boos]

  • We got the guns,

  • we got the numbers!

  • [crowd cheers]

  • - Hostage takers would never come outside

  • and expose themselves to law enforcement like that.

  • The minute they give a clear shot,

  • they're gonna be shot.

  • There's no way that would ever happen.

  • [television static]

  • Next up, Inside Man.

  • In this scene, a bank robber challenges

  • law enforcement to solve a riddle.

  • - [Voice On Phone] What do you want me to say?

  • - That my plane is ready.

  • - Okay, listen.

  • I promise you, as God as my witness,

  • I'm working on it as hard as I can.

  • It's just gonna take a few more hours.

  • - So what you see here is a person

  • asking for a mode of transportation.

  • In this case an airplane.

  • Which seems kind of outrageous.

  • And the hostage taker may be a little delusional

  • and think that these things are actually

  • going to happen.

  • So what law enforcement is gonna do

  • here is delay and stall and try to keep him calm

  • and not go into a tail spin and injuring someone.

  • So as long as he believes that there is going to be

  • an airplane coming,

  • it may buy law enforcement some time

  • to try to work out the situation.

  • But the reality is,

  • is that you don't see a lot of people requesting airplanes.

  • Probably because most of them can't fly airplanes.

  • - Why should I give you any more time?

  • - Well it's simple,

  • you give me more time, you get what you want.

  • You don't give me the time,

  • you don't get what you want.

  • You got nothing to lose.

  • [paper rustles]

  • Meanwhile, we'll send in some more food.

  • - Typically, in situations like this

  • you always notice the hostage taker

  • beginning to become uncomfortable.

  • And in a lot of instances,

  • we want to keep them uncomfortable.

  • Something like food, though,

  • we want to dangle it out there

  • and not necessarily give it to them,

  • it's just a matter of keeping them calm

  • and giving them something to aspire to

  • rather than going through a tail spin

  • in a crisis situation

  • and actually start hurting people.

  • - I got a question for you.

  • You get it right, I give you more time.

  • - [Voice On Phone] And?

  • - You know what happens if you don't.