Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Yeah, we are very privileged to be able to work together, and we make a great team thes days that we wanna kill way Marlise is really passionate about animals.

  • On the other hand, I look at the scientific side of things.

  • You have a hit in a hard situation, and that's the most successful combination that you can have for conservation.

  • Yeah, now who say has to sort of legs that it stands on, firstly, the sanctuary itself, where the animals that come here that can never go back into the world are looked after and then making sure that we mitigate human wildlife conflict in this country.

  • The rapid response unit started because we had to trace the source off animals coming to us, putting animals in captivity because they are perceived this problem animals is not a solution to the country.

  • She doesn't.

  • Leopards in Namibia occur mostly outside of predicted areas, and that is mostly commercial farmland, so the chances off conflict is very high.

  • Normally, it's not the healthy individual.

  • It's always the either very young one.

  • They lost their moms and they try and survive or fits an injured animal or a very old animal.

  • But the perception is very often that every cheetah, every level, every arena is a ritual livestock raider, corcula and those perceptions way knew we had to change.

  • Cheetah numbers, especially in central Namibia, are dwindling in terms of leopards.

  • I think the challenge still remains natural habitat and unsustainable developed.

  • And if we lose, thes carnivores will have severe pains to the ecosystem.

  • I don't think people realize what the impact is.

  • If we lose a specie, everybody is at the disadvantage.

  • Not only the people that live there.

  • Hi.

  • A rapid response would normally happen when we get a phone call in and then train reaction starts.

  • So just give me some emotion about this statement from that, it's first of all, Jesus, um, he's lost two cops a month because of a leopard, and he's now called the Slip in and capture Cage, and he doesn't want us to call it and release on the property.

  • He wants us to remove this kid, so we have to find a spot now through this little to go before we even started driving from here and we need to get a permit to pick up.

  • We don't have a place that we could take A except E.

  • I think if you can put that application for E right, I'm a cattle farmer, and this property is in the north northeast, off Namibia.

  • Our income is basically just coming from cattle.

  • And in this case, the leopard actually came all the way to our homestead trying to get the coughs out of the enclosure.

  • And so that's why we took measures to catch him.

  • Mhm.

  • All right, I give him 180 mg of ketamine on DFO.

  • Come out when the grams of military machine.

  • That should do the job.

  • Trance.

  • Locating an animal doesn't happen very often.

  • It's a last resort for us.

  • Me and really walk up to the cage.

  • Now on the bite.

  • Call his attention.

  • So it turns his button pretty A good name.

  • E.

  • Yeah.

  • How long will it take it?

  • About 2015 to 20 minutes.

  • If he's half awake and you start stimulating him, then it's not good weight till he sleeps deep enough and then we go closer.

  • Um, we're just going to duel the measurements and kiddies.

  • Wait 40 temperature.

  • That's a nice, cool somebody.

  • He has an injury here just this document that the blue sprys just the animal arctic spray the color that we're gonna put on and it's got a VHF and GPS satellite unit is equipped with a drop off mechanism.

  • So by that time, way would have established where this animal has settled into a home range.

  • And what has happened to the animal?

  • It's 112th animal that we've immobilized in the last nine years.

  • We've been very, very lucky.

  • We have not had one mortality when we moved in.

  • Animal.

  • We've done over 680 consultations with farmers.

  • When we started 80% off animals would b shot in the capture cage.

  • In the last year, only 0.3% got killed.

  • So I think we've come a long way in terms off changing perceptions and working with landowners and farmers in looking at alternatives.

  • Yeah, yeah, yeah, we're going to stop in a short while just to check up on the onion.

  • Just make sure it's not breathing well.

  • It's just good.

  • Everything is still a kind.

  • Yeah, it's a little bit awake, so don't fiddle with a with a half away clip.

  • But temperature, especially if you have to take a break.

  • So we reached our release site, a protected area.

  • We're looking for a tree that we can throw the rope over to open the gotcha cage gate.

  • Tie a rope to the gate and throw the rope over a tree and then from the inside of the car, pull it open.

  • Everybody should be in the cars now.

  • When we pull this open, please.

  • Windows rolled up.

  • Leopards are not like cheetahs or lions that when you release them, they just run off.

  • Lipids tend to come back and attack you.

  • Sometimes they take the town.

  • Yeah, if you release a animal into release site, they must be fully awake cause there's other predators in the area.

  • That's it.

  • Very good, right?

  • Oh, okay.

  • Is it getting help?

  • Yeah, There he goes.

  • No window, No CEO in the day's work, E.

  • I mean, that's what it's all about.

  • Prayed doesn't cause any trouble.

  • And it's great to know there's never be in farmers that, as they are to keep him alive, not ideal, that you've moved him out of his territory.

Yeah, we are very privileged to be able to work together, and we make a great team thes days that we wanna kill way Marlise is really passionate about animals.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 cage namibia release awake rope leopard

Protecting Leopards From Human & Wildlife Conflicts | National Geographic

  • 1 0
    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/23
Video vocabulary