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  • everybody, It's me, your mate Elliott from E.

  • T.

  • J.

  • English On today, we're combining slang on pronunciation together.

  • Let's dio e No, that you guys love learning pronunciation.

  • That's what this channel is about.

  • And I also know that you love slang and British expressions.

  • On one of the most popular videos on my channel is some common English expressions that we use here in the UK So I thought today I'd actually teach you how to pronounce some of those words on some new words.

  • So we're going to learn a little bit of the meaning of these words, but mainly the pronunciation.

  • On in particular, we're focusing on how to pronounce the tricky parts of the words.

  • So the vowels, or maybe some constant clusters or pronouncing the T or not pronouncing the T.

  • So just how to sound the most British when we pronounce the's British slang words makes sense, right?

  • So let's get straight into it.

  • We're going to start with probably the two most common slang, all kind of native words in British English.

  • And those are cheers on.

  • Can you guess the next one, mate?

  • Cheers, mate.

  • They both have to sounds which are kind of related to each other.

  • We call them def thongs Now, def.

  • Thongs are.

  • When we combine two vowels on, we push them together.

  • When we push them together, they become a diff thought one sound but with two vowels in it.

  • So we have ear.

  • Andi A e A.

  • Yeah, A cheers made.

  • So look what I'm doing with my mouth.

  • Firstly, with ear.

  • Imagine you're really happy and you want to produce the e sound.

  • You do a nice smile with the mouth on the tongue goes slightly high in the top of the mouth and then imagine you're really, really happy, right?

  • You're smiling, you're really happy.

  • And then suddenly something bad happens.

  • Your mouth is going to go neutral.

  • So here, yeah, on the tongue should go to the middle of the mouth to pronounce the Schwab's sound.

  • Cheers.

  • Try it without the at the end.

  • Cheer.

  • Now try and add the on the end.

  • Cheers.

  • A very similar sound.

  • A a.

  • So tongue should be near the front in the middle of the mouth and then the tongue is going up and we're doing that smiling shape again.

  • A A.

  • Now let's try it without the at the end, May mate.

  • So let's try them both together now.

  • Cheers, mate.

  • Now you don't have to pronounce the T at the end of mate.

  • It's actually quite common for people to say, mate.

  • However, you need to know how to pronounce the glass or tea, which is essentially a sound we create in the throat where we cut the sound off and we create some tension.

  • It's almost like I'm silently pronouncing it inside of my mouth.

  • I'm not doing any at all.

  • It's very, very common British thing.

  • And this happens a lot with the word mate.

  • So sounding like a native, we would say, Cheers, mate.

  • Next one a word for money, we would say quid.

  • So I would say there are to difficulties here.

  • Firstly, is the continent cluster?

  • The cut on the were joining together.

  • Cool.

  • We have to do it all in one quick motion.

  • So the sound we have to press our tongue kind of the middle of our tongue up against the top of our mouth on the front of the tongue should be going down into the bottom of our mouth on.

  • We're creating pressure to create a sounds.

  • Okay.

  • We have to push the air out on release the tongue when it's pressing against the top of the mouth.

  • Okay, Now you need to add a what into it, which makes it really difficult for some learners.

  • The what sound?

  • We create a very small round shape with the mouth, like in a word like woman.

  • Okay, but we're combining it with a on.

  • We need to do it all in one breath.

  • Quid.

  • What?

  • What now?

  • Try them together.

  • What now?

  • The next difficulty that people find is the sound lots of people pronounce.

  • It is e.

  • So I hear many of my students staying tweed, but we need it to be quid it.

  • So to pronounce the sound.

  • If you remember the e sound I talked about before, it's similar, but we do need to make it firstly shorter on.

  • We need to move the tongue down just a little bit lower.

  • It should be just below the top teeth or just behind the sharp edge of the top.

  • Teeth on the chin should drop down just slightly quick.

  • Hey, quit quid.

  • Now, I said about when we're really upset or disappointed or annoyed about something, we might be gutted.

  • Okay, Now the important thing here is actually the ending of the word.

  • We're not saying gut head.

  • We're saying gutted Although it's spelt with an e d were pronouncing it as ID.

  • So we're doing this.

  • It sound again.

  • Gah!

  • Tit God tit gutted.

  • Next word I want to practice has a very, very British sound This British sound It's so important to make you sound more British And it's the aw sound.

  • The word is Brawley.

  • So a brolly is the short word for an umbrella and you always need an umbrella in England, even in the summer.

  • Trust me, the sound is off.

  • Okay, Now this sound is so important to British English because it's in words like lots and not on an American would say lots and nut.

  • We do this all sound, which just makes us sound British.

  • So we really need to make sure we get this sound correct broadly.

  • Now, the other difficulty here is we have another continent cluster.

  • We have a B and in our burr bra.

  • Bra bra, Bro, bro.

  • Now I think the best way to practice this constant cluster is including the op sound.

  • So to produce this op sound, we need to keep the tongue quite low.

  • But we need to push it back slightly into the back of the mouth.

  • So it's low, and in the back of the mouth on we create a very, very round shape with the mouth.

  • Oh, bra Brawley.

  • See if you can find some or words with the op sound in it and keep practicing it to sound a bit more British in your speech.

  • Now everybody knows this one.

  • I've taught this one a few times in some lessons, but still I haven't taught the pronunciation on this.

  • Word is knackered.

  • Everybody loves this word on I've heard many people pronounced it wrong.

  • To be knackered simply means tired.

  • Okay, Knackered.

  • No.

  • Is the beginning.

  • OK, Although it begins with a K, it's a silent K.

  • We don't say knackered.

  • We have to start with enough sound now.

  • Okay, Now the act sound tongue low at the front of the mouth behind your bottom teeth.

  • A open wide.

  • Nah.

  • Cut.

  • Now we have a Schwab sound here.

  • Okay, So now could could could a case.

  • We're doing an earth sound in their tongue in the middle of the mouth relaxed Na could could and it has to be said quickly, knackered, knackered on.

  • When we're a little bit hungry, we might say that we are peckish.

  • Okay, Kish, I think that's quite uneasy.

  • One air on it are the two vowels there.

  • Lots of people do get confused by these two vows.

  • We have air where we need to keep the tongue at the front, in the middle, off the mouth.

  • And then if the tongue just needs to go a little bit higher.

  • So we have air e pack cash pack ish.

  • Andi, if we're a little bit drunk, we might say that we are smashed now.

  • The main thing I want to focus on here is the H at the end.

  • So we're doing a H sound, and then we need to quickly finish with it on.

  • We need to do all of this in one breath.

  • It's a constant cluster, so do it with me, which, imagine you're ending the story you're ending.

  • That sound the sound with a very quick smashed smashed.

  • So if you were drunk last weekend, you could say I was smashed last weekend and Finally, I like to use this word when I'm talking about someone, a male person I don't really know.

  • So I could say, for example, I was walking in the street yesterday and I saw this bloke very, very British word here.

  • Bloke on again.

  • We have a diff thong.

  • Oh oh, So we have Schwab on.

  • Then do bloke, bloke, blah, blah, blah So but on DLA we need to join those together bloke below oak on another word which has that Oh, sound in it would be Lo did again finishing with it loaded.

  • If you're loaded, it means you have lots of money on skint.

  • That's the opposite.

  • That means you have no money at the moment.

  • I'm skint, skint.

  • Now that's all of your words on.

  • I really hope this helps you with learning how to pronounce some of these words, which I've taught you before.

  • It's all good learning a new word and learning new words.

  • But if you don't know how to pronounce them, then you can't really use them.

  • So that's why I did this lesson today, and pronunciation is my specialty.

  • It's my full time job to teach people pronunciation on do you can become one of my students on.

  • I'd love to help you.

  • All you have to do is click the link in the description below to go to e.

  • T.

  • J english dot com on you Conjoined my online pronunciation course, which will teach you how to reduce your accent on how to replace your current accent with a new, beautiful British accent with intonation, stress, vowels everything on You.

  • Also get to talk to me on WhatsApp whenever you want, with voice messaging and feedback on just conversation So I'd love to meet you there.

  • Feel free to come and see me in next week's YouTube video.

  • Take care.

  • Cheers, guys.

  • Bye.

everybody, It's me, your mate Elliott from E.

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B1 INT sound mouth tongue british pronounce mate

British Slang | How to Pronounce Common Words in Modern RP

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    林宜悉   posted on 2020/10/23
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