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  • - Hi, I'm Yeardley Smith.

  • You may know me as the voice of Lisa Simpson,

  • and I'm here to improvise some voices for some cartoon

  • characters I've never seen before.

  • Just to manage your expectations,

  • I am actually one of the only people on The Simpsons

  • who really does only one voice,

  • once in a while I do an old lady,

  • but that gives you some idea of how this is gonna go.

  • Great, all right, let's get started.

  • Aw. [laughs]

  • Here we have a,

  • a sad, orange,

  • dragon-y, cyclops-y blobby.

  • I think maybe, you know, she sounds like this,

  • "My name is Iris.

  • I want to play hide and seek with the other

  • cyclops-dragon girls in my class and they were like,

  • 'No Iris, your eye is too big, it's like cheating.'

  • So I'm just in here, against the blue wall

  • with my little dragon spiky spikes,

  • and, [sniffs] you know, I'm kinda sad,

  • I'm sad today, a little sad."

  • I cry a lot, as Lisa Simpson.

  • There are a few things I do a lot, as Lisa Simpson.

  • I talk to myself, quite often.

  • Like if you actually knew how often

  • Lisa Simpson talks to herself,

  • you would think, "Somebody help that girl."

  • And I sing a lot, as Lisa Simpson,

  • which is tough, because Lisa Simpson is right up here,

  • singing is all about opening your throat,

  • and to do Lisa Simpson I close my throat a little bit,

  • so I have about a four note range, as Lisa Simpson,

  • but they're all like, "No Yeardley, it's great,

  • you have great pitch, you're good at it, bleah."

  • And I'm like, [groans].

  • Please knock it off.

  • So to cry, and also to laugh,

  • to laugh, it's all really in the solar plexus.

  • There's like a heart contraction

  • that I feel when I pretend to be that sad

  • that I think

  • makes the crying sound really authentic.

  • The other thing is that, as Lisa Simpson,

  • often, I would say at least 70% of the time

  • when Lisa is crying, I, as Yeardley, I'm actually crying.

  • That's how much I connect to my character.

  • So I can throw a little love, a little technique

  • toward "I'm really so sad, so..." [crying]

  • Oh, hello. A very, very tall sort of crane.

  • I'm all covered up because I don't want

  • to have any contact with you at all.

  • But I hear you ordered a drink,

  • so I have it right here in my syringe."

  • I'll call you Doctor Prick,

  • because you carry a big stick that has a big prick on it.

  • And I like to think that instead of there being

  • some sort of medicine in there, it's a martini. [laughs]

  • In a play once, I had to play all these different characters

  • and I played like a sort of Fatty Arbuckle kind of barfly.

  • He sounded like this. "Oh hello.

  • I brought you your martini."

  • Which sounds a little sort of otherworldly,

  • like you've revived this poor bird from the dead,

  • but you know, he/she does not look unlike

  • he/she was revived from the dead.

  • "Hello, I hear you like your martini stirred, not shaken.

  • So I have it right here, in this syringe."

  • Really, so that's all right here in the throat.

  • And I remember, again, when I was doing that play,

  • I had to, it was about a five minute sketch,

  • and my castmates were like,

  • "Yeardly, you're gonna wreck your voice."

  • And somehow I didn't.

  • But there's almost no actual voice to it.

  • It's really guttural.

  • "You're really in there."

  • "Ummmmmm, hi. My name is, um...

  • my name is Charlotte.

  • I'm a unicorn

  • with really long blue hair,

  • um, here's the thing, though,

  • I have this really ugly birthmark on my tummy.

  • So I kinda thought, maybe if I grow my hair long enough,

  • I can, like, wear it in front and cover my, my birthmark."

  • I don't think Charlotte would be like,

  • the big booming sort of a unicorn

  • with a big blue birthmark on her tum.

  • I don't know, she doesn't look that way to me.

  • And she's small, she's itty-bitty.

  • She could be from the South, you know,

  • she could be, I'm not sure what state this accent is from,

  • cause I, as Yeardley, have done a lot of Southern accents

  • and people are like, "Where are you from?"

  • I'm like, "I was an Army brat. Leave me alone.

  • All over the South!"

  • But yes, maybe Charlotte is just like, "You know,

  • I just want to get along with everybody.

  • I bring cookies everywhere I go.

  • I like to hand them out.

  • I think it's a great way to make friends.

  • What are you, like a rat? Are you a monkey?

  • If you were shown this picture in an audition,

  • with a guy, it would be like,

  • [growls] "Really really rough and tough," right?

  • But what if he's, like, you know, like Cockney,

  • and he's like, "What? What you staring at?

  • No, I'm not grimacing at you, it's how I smile!

  • I was born this way, right?

  • I don't want to eat you.

  • I don't eat people anymore, I'm a vegetarian.

  • Yeah, I'm a vegetarian."

  • Or maybe it's sorta like a Fat Tony kind of type, right?

  • Maybe his name is, uh, Skinny Sam.

  • "And uh, you know, I used to be kinda skinny,

  • used to be skinny, but, uh,

  • now that I don't rob so many banks anymore,

  • uh, just, you know, I sit around a lot,

  • I just count the money, that's what I do.

  • So, you know, I'm trying to stay like middle management.

  • It's what I'm trying to do here."

  • Oh, Granny!

  • [groans] So, when I listen to Dan Castellaneta do Grampa,

  • he kinda does this breathy, again, not much

  • actual voice to Grampa

  • so I say to Dan, "Dan, could you do my lines

  • as the old lady who," I think... what is her name?

  • That's how often I do her.

  • Like, literally, they've killed her off three times

  • and brought her back to life

  • cause I do it so badly they think it's hilarious.

  • So I'll ask him to do my line,

  • there's usually one or two, and then he'll do it,

  • and then I imitate him, literally.

  • So, all right, let's see.

  • What's your name? What's your name?

  • "My name is, uh...

  • My name is Mary.

  • My name's Mary.

  • And, um, you know, they took away my license,

  • so I'm like, that's okay. You can not keep me down.

  • And sure I wear a helmet, but really, my hair is my helmet.

  • My husband died like, I dunno, 20 years ago?

  • I'm all right! I'm not lonely! Look at me go.

  • You can't stop me!"

  • Or she could be a smoker.

  • "My name is Mary, and, uh, they took away my license,

  • and so I was like, you know what? Up yours.

  • And I got a skateboard.

  • And you know what else? I got sneaks to match my skateboard!

  • And then I got a snazzy little top

  • and a little helmet to match my sneaks and my skateboard."

  • This is, this is a worm.

  • "I'm a worm. And I'm green.

  • And, uh, I'm a bookworm. Duh!

  • Cause I'm holding a book, and I'm a worm!

  • But do you know what the P.S is?

  • I can't actually read! This is a picture book! [chuckles]

  • I like to turn the pages with my tongue,

  • that's what I really like, but I, you know,

  • I just do that when I think nobody's looking."

  • Maybe he would, he would sort of have a stuffy nose.

  • If I mean, I really was to amp up the goofiness,

  • I don't know.

  • Now he's starting to sound like Carl on The Simpsons

  • that Hank Azaria does. [laughs]

  • He might not appreciate that. I don't know. [laughs]

  • I always wanted to do a valley girl on The Simpsons,

  • where there's a girl character named Shauna

  • and I once got to fill in for Tress MacNeille

  • who does the voice of Shauna,

  • You know, like, the bee is like,

  • "My name is Bea, Beatrice, but Bea for short.

  • I'm a lesbian bee, and I live in the hive

  • with, like, my wife and my 5000 kids.

  • What's great about the hive is great benefits.

  • We have, like, we have great medical.

  • We even have extra antenna care, which is super good

  • if your eyebrows are already

  • growing on your antenna, you know.

  • Also, wing care. We have great wing care at the hive."

  • What if the mislead on this bee

  • is that she's really, or he,

  • is really, like, this teen punk prankster?

  • "Hey! Listen! I'm a bee!

  • My name is Bud the Bee.

  • I'm smiling here, but I gotta tell you,

  • this bucket of honey? Super heavy, dude!

  • It's super freaking heavy!

  • So, uh, if you could just take the picture,

  • so I could put the bucket down,

  • and then I could lay down in the flowers,

  • that would be awesome."

  • [yells]

  • This poor little alarm clock!

  • If I could do a good Gilbert Gottfried

  • or a [laughs] Bobcat Goldthwaite.

  • "People! People! We have a problem!

  • I'm missing some numbers!

  • I'm missing number nine!

  • But I think it got eaten by seven eight nine!"

  • Here's what's unfair.

  • So this expression, of course,

  • wouldn't be the whole scene, right?

  • It would just be a moment, hopefully,

  • of this poor little alarm clock losing its whatever,

  • because it's missing some numbers. [laughs]

  • Maybe all the rest of the time,

  • the alarm clock is like, um,

  • "Allo! I am your alarm clock!

  • I know I look very analog, and you prefer the digital,

  • but I'm very useful!

  • And I can make a very big noise, like this!

  • [screams]

  • See? That's very useful, don't you think?

  • Cause I know that when I go off,

  • you do not like to wake up, huh?

  • You just lay there like a big slug.

  • And so I can just, you know, maybe be so loud

  • that you wish you could throw me against the wall!"

  • Well, favorites, thanks so much for watching.

  • It was fun for me.

  • I hope it was fun for you.

  • [laughs]

- Hi, I'm Yeardley Smith.

Subtitles and keywords

B1 INT lisa simpson bee alarm clock sad alarm

Lisa Simpson (Yeardley Smith) Improvises 8 New Cartoon Voices | Vanity Fair

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    林宜悉   posted on 2020/10/23
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