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  • stimulus is our first topic today on CNN.

  • 10 of Carla's Who's got to have you watching?

  • Here's your down the middle explanation of what's going on, the coronavirus pandemic and all of the fears controversies and closures related to it have taken a toll on economies around the world.

  • To try to lessen the impact of all this on the U.

  • S.

  • Economy, the federal government has been passing stimulus packages plans involving massive amounts of government spending that are intended to stimulate the economy and limit the damage of Cove in 19.

  • The upside of this is that it can provide the money and assistance needed to help businesses stay afloat and help consumers keep their jobs and homes.

  • The downside is that a stimulus plan may involve MAWR government spending than it's worth and that it increases the government's amount of debt.

  • Right now, the U.

  • S Congress is considering two new stimulus plans, one from Democrats who control the House of Representatives and one from Republicans who control the Senate.

  • The Democrats plan was announced in May.

  • If passed, as is, it would include direct checks to many Americans, assistance for those who've lost their jobs and tens of billions of dollars for education.

  • The Republicans plan was announced this week.

  • If passed as is, it would include direct checks to many Americans, Assistance for those who have lost their jobs and tens of billions of dollars for education sound the same.

  • They're not.

  • For one thing, the Republican Senate bill would spend $1 trillion the Democrats House bill would spend $3 trillion.

  • And the disagreements between the two sides are over.

  • Who gets the money, how much money states, local governments and individuals would get and how exactly it should be spent.

  • So there are some major differences that have to be ironed out before a single bill is agreed upon that could pass in both chambers of Congress and eventually land on President Donald Trump's desk for signature.

  • 12th trivia.

  • Frederick Measure was best known for his research into what super conductivity, quasars, bacterial mutations or nuclear acids.

  • When I say Misha, you should think nuclear acids, which he is credited with discovering in the 18 hundreds.

  • Scientists say there's strong evidence that the coronavirus has mutated, but that sounds scarier than it may actually be.

  • Earlier this month, an international group of researchers reported that the mutated form of CO vid 19 is actually the major form of it that's spreading around the world.

  • In total, there have been more than 16.5 million cases of coronavirus recorded since tracking began.

  • But here's the silver lining.

  • While the mutated coronavirus may be able to spread more easily, doctors say, at first glance it doesn't appear to be more deadly.

  • In fact, there are reports that this strain of coronavirus could be less severe than it was before it mutated.

  • Researchers say more work is needed to know any of this for sure, but viral mutations are just things that normal viruses tend to do.

  • Mutation is a word that conjures up all kinds of images.

  • Radioactive waste viruses.

  • They're generally not pleasant, But the truth is, mutations aren't always dangerous for viruses.

  • They're actually pretty mundane.

  • Usually, we have genetic material DNA in all of ourselves.

  • As cells multiply and DNA gets copied, mistakes get made.

  • In fact, your DNA mutates all the time, and you almost never notice.

  • But sometimes those changes do matter.

  • They could be good changes linked, For example, toe lower risk of diabetes or they could be harmful.

  • For example, the mutations that can cause cancer viruses mutate as well, especially those with genetic material made of RNA.

  • RNA is one strand instead of two strands, and it mutates even more easily than DNA does.

  • Usually, these mutations are neutral or even harmful to the virus, possibly making it less lethal.

  • But this also explains why there's a new flu vaccine every year.

  • Flu viruses constantly change, and these changes can eventually make the virus unrecognizable to the immune system, meaning the antibodies we had from last year's flu shot no longer really protect us.

  • The novel coronavirus has mutated in a way that effects it's spike protein.

  • That's a protein that allows it to enter human cells.

  • And while this mutation may make it spread more easily from person to person, it doesn't seem to make people any sicker.

  • The big question looming on the horizon.

  • How might mutations affect our search for a vaccine?

  • Mm hmm.

  • For the students who graduated high school in 2020 there might have been a sort of novelty in being a part of history, despite everything they had to miss out on because of the pandemic, online graduations and community efforts to recognize them might have it least shown just how unique they are.

  • They're members of the Onley class ever to have experienced something like socially distant commencement ceremonies.

  • For those entering or returning to college, though the restrictions many will face could make that novelty wear off.

  • On one side of the argument the idea that people have to do whatever it takes, continuing to make sacrifices to keep a new virus from spreading.

  • On the other side of the argument that students are paying for an in person college experience and not exactly getting one through online instruction.

  • What are some incoming college freshmen saying about all this?

  • I think with senior year ending the way that they did, I really, really was looking forward to college, to be able to start over.

  • This was something that I'd worked for for a long time, and I put hard work into.

  • I was like, over the moon to go to Harvard, and then over the summer I thought the pandemic would get better and it kept getting worse once they released the fact that we would have all online classes, I was really really disappointed.

  • I remember telling my mom I was crying to her about how upset I was.

  • Remember telling her I'm not even excited to go to the number one college in the country, even though I should be so, so excited.

  • I'm just sad.

  • I am incredibly aware that I am privileged not just to go to Harvard, but also financially.

  • Um, Cova, 19 even though it has affected my family financially, has not affected us as much as some families and talking with some of my classmates.

  • I know that for a lot of them actually going, Harvard is the best option because of the generous financial aid that Harvard has given them.

  • Um, really, really lucky to be going to an institution like Harvard that has such a large endowment and resource is through its connections because as a low income student, if I didn't have access to all that, I probably would be staying home this semester.

  • So my plan is to be there on campus in the fall.

  • Um, when I was debating with my parents, I just told them that if I have any option of having even a little taste, I guess of the college experience.

  • I want that right.

  • I don't wanna have to give that up.

  • As far as I know, everyone has single rooms.

  • All classes are online and the dining hole is gonna be reservations on Lee or take out having a college experience.

  • I just don't think is worth sacrificing the lives or potentially sacrificing the lives of students or teachers on.

  • There's a lot of people we have to consider in this situation.

  • My dad is really big on making the best out of every situation and trying to look at things logically.

  • So he told me, You're not taking a gap here.

  • We can't afford it.

  • But what are you going to do about it?

  • And so I realized that I might as well make an opportunity out of a really, really unfortunate situation.

  • I think it's a commonality within the student body that all of us have an ambition to be something mawr and to strive for something better.

  • And I see that a lot right now because even though there is ah lot of shared disappointment, there's also a lot of reminding each other of the opportunities we will still have and reminding each other of the experiences that were still very lucky to get, and so I'm still very much looking forward to that, and I still do feel very lucky.

  • Uh, despite all this confusion in all the unknown for 10 out of 10 see spot run on batteries, this is the Boston Dynamics robot dog we told you about in the spring.

  • It's called Spot, and it's now available for companies to buy for around $75,000.

  • Ford is one such buyer, and this facility has named its new assistant Fluffy, though it's anything but.

  • Fluffy's job is to help engineers develop new car programs, and while it may not be fun to pet, at least it doesn't need to be taken outside because it doesn't make any poodles.

  • It's a kind of working breed, and it's ha been easy to see that Ford's Newfoundland assistant isn't gonna hound anyone to play, and it never needs to take a break for Chow chow.

  • I'm Carla Zeus, and that's a wrap for CNN, right?

stimulus is our first topic today on CNN.

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B1 INT mutated harvard college stimulus coronavirus dna

Anything But A Normal Year | July 29, 2020

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    林宜悉   posted on 2020/10/23
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