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  • Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.  

  • I'm Tom and joining me today is Catherine. Hi Catherine.

  • Hello Tom. Hello everybody. Today we're looking at a recovery in the Chinese economy.

  • And don't forget if you want to test yourself on the vocabulary that you  

  • learned today we have a quiz at www.bbclearningenglish.com.  

  • Now, let's hear more about today's news story from a BBC World News bulletin:

  • Yes, so a lot of countries have experienced economic downturns due to the coronavirus,  

  • but China says its economy is recovering. Nowthis is partly due to the travel restrictions,  

  • which mean that Chinese people are choosing to holiday in China instead of going abroad.

  • And we've got three words and phrases that you can use to talk about today's story.

  • Yes, we have: 'bounce back', 'accelerates' and 'rebound'.

  • 'Bounce back', 'accelerates' and 'rebound'.

  • Catherine, can you give us today's first headline please?

  • Yes. We're starting here in the UK with BBC Newsthe headline:

  • 'Bounce back' – return to a high level. What can you tell us about 'bounce back', Catherine?

  • Oh, I can tell you lots about 'bounce back', Tom,  

  • starting with: it's a phrasal verb. It's made of two words:  

  • the first word is 'bounce' – B-O-U-N-C-E – and the second word is 'back' – B-A-C-K.

  • Now, 'bounce' is a verb of movement  

  • and it's often associated with ballsSo, do you like ball games, Tom?

  • I do like a game of tennis from time to time, yes. Why?

  • Well, think about your tennis ball, Tom:  

  • what happens if you get your tennis ball and you throw it against the ground or a wall?

  • So, if I get my tennis ball and I throw it against the wall, it will bounce  

  • and it will come back to me, so you're right it will 'bounce back'.

  • It'll 'bounce back' with a lot of energy as well;  

  • it's not like a small movement, a bounceis it? It's really, kind of, quite powerful.

  • It is, yes, but what does this have to do with economic recovery?

  • Aha! Good question. Well, if you think about that recoverythat the ball  

  • comes back with lots of energy... an economic 'bounce back' means that the economy has  

  • struggled, it has fallen, it's slowed downbut it turns around and begins to recover:  

  • it has more energy, it grows againAnd that's the sense of this economic  

  • 'bounce back', which we can also use as a noun phrase: in China the economy is growing stronger

  • It was weak. It was strugglingbut now it's strong and powerful.

  • So, we can use it to, kind of, indicate a comeback.  

  • Now, I'm thinking of a famous British politician who made a comeback recently.

  • Well, Boris Johnson, the prime minister, came back or 'bounced back' from coronavirus.

  • He was really quite ill with it and now he's back to health, so that's a 'bounce back'.  

  • You can 'bounce back' from anything bad: a breakup, you know, a bad job situation,  

  • an illness, lots of things. When you get better and you feel better, you've 'bounced back'.

  • 'To bounce back' – a very useful word. Thank you, Catherine.

  • OK. 'Bounce back' was a phrasal verb and we've got plenty more  

  • about phrasal verbs as well, don't we Catherine?

  • Most definitely, and if you want to see some videos, just click the link down below there.

  • Click the link. Click the link.

  • OK, fantastic. Catherine, let's have a look at your second headline please.

  • Yes. We're still in the UK with The Independent this time:

  • 'Accelerates' – goes faster. What can you tell us about 'accelerates', Catherine?

  • I can tell you that 'accelerates' is a verbIt's spelt like this: A-C-C-E-L-E-R-A-T-E-S.  

  • The 's' because the subject is China's economy in this case. Yes. Now, for pronunciation we've  

  • got a four syllable word here: 'accelerates'.

  • And the stress, Tom is where?

  • 'ac-CEL-erates'. So, it's 'accelerates'.  

  • Often with four syllable words we can find the stress on the second syllable.

  • Second syllable it is. Now 'acceleratesdescribes speed. It describes increasing  

  • speed. If something accelerates, it goes faster and faster. Now, if you're driving  

  • you use a pedal with your foot to make your car or bike go faster and that pedal is called what, Tom?

  • That is the 'accelerator'. That's the name of the  

  • pedal and we can say it gives us increased 'acceleration'.

  • Good noun! Good noun – 'acceleration'. Now, what has this got to do with the Chinese economy?  

  • Well, 'accelerate' is to do with speed but it can be not just physical speed in a  

  • vehiclemoving vehicleit's to do with growth in this case. The growth is getting  

  • faster and faster and faster, so the economy's growth is getting faster: it's accelerating.  

  • Things are not alwaysit's not always about upward movement. A decline or a decrease can  

  • also 'accelerate'. If something's going down faster and faster, it's still 'accelerating'.

  • So, it describes the speed at which something moves and we can use it to describe a car,  

  • or a quickening trend like the growth in China.  

  • Are there any other words we could use with accelerate?

  • Yes. Now, we can often use adjectives and adverbs depending on whether it's a verb or a noun.

  • So, you can talk about things 'quickly accelerating'. You can talk about them 'accelerating steadily',  

  • for example. A very, very common word to use is 'rapidly' – something 'accelerates rapidly' or  

  • you can talk about a 'rapid accelerationand that means a very fast acceleration.

  • It sounds very dramatic, doesn't it? Yeah.

  • You 'rapidly accelerate' from somethingOK. Wonderful. Thank you Catherine.

  • And we have more videos about driving as well, don't we?

  • We do: in fact, driving withoutdriver. To watch a video all about  

  • driverless cars, just click the link.

  • Fantastic. And let's have a look at our next headline please.

  • Yes. We're in the Middle East for this oneit's Al Jazeera and the headline:

  • And we can see that word 'accelerate' again.

  • So, 'rebound' – recovery. What can you tell us about rebound?

  • Yes. Now, R-E-B-O-U-N-D – 'rebound' – begins with that little prefix,

  • or prefix, 're-' – 'R-E'. Now, 're-' means what, Tom?

  • It means to happen again, doesn't it?

  • Exactly. The key part of the prefix is 'again'. 'Bound',  

  • and 'rebound' I should say, is very similar to a 'comeback' or a 'bounce back'. If something's  

  • gone away and then it comes back, it's 'rebounded'. Something got bad; it got better...  

  • we talk about a 'rebound'. So, the Chinese economy was bad; now it's better, it's 'rebounded'.

  • So, I heard you use 'rebound' as a verb as well. Is that right?

  • Yes, it is. It's a verb as well as a noun. The pronunciation is slightly different though.  

  • So, when this word is a noun, the stress is on the first syllable, like this

  • 'RE-bound'.

  • And when it's a verb we stress the second syllable, like this

  • 're-BOUND' – as in the Chinese economy has 'rebounded'.

  • Good example.

  • So, my favourite use of the noun 'reboundis as part of a fixed expression to talk  

  • about relationships. Can you tell us more please?

  • Oh yes, this is a good one. Now Tom, imagine  

  • that you were deeply in love with somebody and then they broke up with you.

  • That sounds awful.

  • Awful, awful, awful... Terrible.

  • ...but somebody else came along quite quicklyafter about two weeks, and you fell in love with  

  • them and you started dating them and all your friends were a little bit worried about it.

  • Sounds like a bit of a rush, actuallyit doesn't sound like a very good idea.

  • Because you're not ready for the relationshipYou went into it 'on the rebound'.

  • 'On the rebound'. So, I kind of bounced off my last relationship

  • straight into a new one... Yep.

  • ...that perhaps isn't perfect or appropriate.

  • Because you're not ready for it, yes. So, don't go into relationships 'on the rebound', Tom.

  • Give yourself a break in between. You should.

  • Great. Catherine, can you please recap today's vocabulary for us?

  • Sure. We had: 'bounce back' – return to a high level.

  • 'Accelerates' – goes faster.

  • And 'rebound' – recovery.

  • And don't forget you can test yourself as well at www.bbclearningenglish.com  

  • and as well as the website we are all over social media. That's it from us today, so  

  • I will see you next time. Say goodbye, Catherine.

  • Bye! Bye everyone. Thank you.

Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.  

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China's Covid Recovery - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/23
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