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  • Transcriber: TED Translators Admin Reviewer: Mirjana Čutura

  • Liz Ogbu: So Lisa,

  • Apple is on target to become carbon neutral

  • across its entire business and manufacturing supply chain

  • by 2030.

  • Can you explain exactly what that means?

  • Lisa Jackson: Sure.

  • So today Apple is carbon neutral for all of our own operations.

  • And we're running on 100 percent renewable energy

  • for our corporate campuses,

  • for our stores

  • and for our data centers.

  • So we know how to do this work.

  • The challenge for 2030 is to convert our supply chain,

  • and that work has already begun.

  • We already have 70 suppliers,

  • over eight gigawatts of energy coming online

  • in our supply chain,

  • and then our last piece

  • will be to convert the energy that our customers use

  • to charge our devices

  • to clean energy.

  • LO: What are some of the biggest changes

  • that Apple's going to need to make in its business operations

  • in order to be able to achieve those goals?

  • LJ: So imagine if instead of mining material

  • to go into Apple products,

  • we actually started with recycled material.

  • So we're not going all the way back to the mine

  • through smelting, transportation, processing.

  • Instead, we're really talking about reprocessing to some degree

  • and putting that material right back into products --

  • super important with things like conflict metals or rare earths.

  • So Apple has been doing that work now for several years.

  • We've actually promised

  • that we want to make all of our products out of recycled and renewable materials.

  • And so that investment

  • also means we get to take away all the carbon emissions

  • associated with everything up until the point of the recycled material.

  • LO: So it strikes me that you actually hold a really interesting perspective.

  • You know, you're now at Apple

  • and, like, deep in the business world around these things,

  • but formerly, you actually led the US Environmental Protection Agency

  • under the Obama administration,

  • so you've seen the government side as well.

  • What, in your mind, is the right way

  • to look at the respective roles of the state and the market

  • in fighting the climate crisis?

  • LJ: I don't think there's anything that business can do

  • that replaces the role of government and leadership.

  • Yes, I ran the EPA,

  • but the other part of my history is I worked there almost 20 years

  • before I became the head of the EPA.

  • And you see firsthand, right,

  • that only government is really charged with protecting its citizens.

  • We always think protection, and we think the military,

  • but I think the protection of the Environmental Protection Agency

  • or the Air Quality Board in California

  • or a local health department

  • is as important to the day-to-day life of the people in that jurisdiction

  • as anything that the other security-type protection can provide.

  • Now, business is a different story.

  • I think business has an incredibly important role to play in leading,

  • especially at this time.

  • So when Apple said its goal is 2030 carbon neutral --

  • obviously the UN is saying 2050 carbon neutral --

  • we decided to challenge ourselves to go as fast as we could possibly do it

  • so that other businesses wouldn't have an excuse to say,

  • "I need longer.

  • I need much, much longer."

  • I think it's great to see this moment

  • where suddenly there seems to be a realization

  • that climate change policy cannot be foisted on others,

  • but that, in fact, it has to be organic,

  • you know, for lack of a better word.

  • And it's not an either-or.

  • It's always been this weird, you know, belief that we're taught from little

  • that you can either be successful or you can do the right thing.

  • There's no difference between the two; it's a false choice.

  • LO: Although a lot of us have been talking about justice for some time,

  • it is only recently that I think

  • this idea of justice as it relates to the environment and climate

  • is making appearance in a forum such as this.

  • You've personally described systemic racism and climate change

  • as interconnected issues,

  • and I think it would be great to hear more.

  • LJ: To me, they're just the same thing.

  • There is no climate justice without real justice.

  • There is no climate change remedy that is going to be made and stick

  • that doesn't involve justice.

  • And sometimes, more and more, I'm starting to think

  • that we shouldn't attack climate change,

  • we should attack justice and injustice,

  • and if we did, climate change would take care of itself.

  • For me, it's always come down to

  • restoring people to the center of the discussion of solutions

  • and restoring representation

  • for the communities most impacted by climate change

  • at the table of solution-making.

  • LO: Well, thank you. I appreciate it.

  • It's been a real pleasure to speak with you today,

  • and I look forward to seeing

  • how you advanced the efforts you talked about.

  • LJ: And thank you for the voice you've been.

  • I think it's super important that leadership look like us,

  • but also sound like you.

  • So thank you.

Transcriber: TED Translators Admin Reviewer: Mirjana Čutura

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Apple's promise to be carbon neutral by 2030 | Lisa Jackson and Liz Ogbu

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/23
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