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  • It's my favorite time of year, Christmas time.

  • I love the festive feeling. I mean, look at this a Christmas tree, lights, ornaments.

  • Yes please.

  • Today we're going to celebrate the Christmas season by taking a friend's episode

  • from Christmas time and using it to learn English.

  • Actually, we're going to take this episode and take little bits from it for the next three Rachel's English videos.

  • All December we are learning English with this episode.

  • What's fun about this episode is in it Rachel quits her job.

  • So, we're also going to be seeing some words some phrases used to describe your job,

  • quitting your job looking for a new job.

  • Here's the scene we'll study today.

  • Rachel.

  • Yeah.

  • Remind me to review with you which pot is decaf, and which is regular.

  • Okay. Fine. Gunther, you know what, I am a terrible waitress.

  • Do you know why I'm a terrible waitress?

  • Because I don't care.

  • I don't care. I don't care which pot is regular and which pot is decaf. I don't care where the tray spot is.

  • I just don't care. This is not what I want to do.

  • So, I don't think I should do it anymore. I'm going to give you my weeks notice.

  • What?

  • Gunther, I quit.

  • Does this mean we're going to have to start paying for coffee?

  • And now with the analysis.

  • Rachel

  • Rachel

  • Rachel

  • Rachel, first syllable stress and the pitch goes up.

  • Ra-chel and the pitch goes up because he's trying to get her attention.

  • It's like saying Rachel do you hear me.

  • Pitch goes up Rachel

  • Rachel

  • Rachel

  • Rachel

  • yeah

  • then she does a really breathy response.

  • Yeah. Yeah.

  • Up-down shape.

  • The breathiness just sort of shows exasperation and that she's kind of over it,

  • She's kind of over this job.

  • Yeah.

  • Yeah.

  • Yeah

  • Remind me to review with you which pot is decaf, and which is regular.

  • And then this next set group is pretty long.

  • What do you hear as the most stressed syllables?

  • Remind me to review with you which pot is decaf, and which is regular.

  • Remind me to review with you which pot is decaf, and which is regular.

  • Remind me to review with you which pot is decaf, and which is regular.

  • It's longer so there are a few. I'm hearing re-mind

  • the stress syllable of that first word the verb remind me to review with you,

  • review some on that verb as well which pot is decaf and which pot is regular.

  • So, the two verbs and then the difference between coffees,

  • decaf and regular and we do have a few reductions.

  • We actually have a dropped D here in the stressed word, in the stressed syllable.

  • It's not uncommon to drop a D between two constants especially when the first one wasn't N like this.

  • So, it's remin' me, remin' me and this is a pretty common two-word phrase.

  • Remind me to do this. Remind me to call mom. Remind me to pick up the dry-cleaning.

  • Remind me... Re-mind me.

  • I diphthong N and then write into the M with no D, remin' me.

  • Remind me...

  • Remind me...

  • Remind me...

  • Now, the word to is not reduced and that's not very natural.

  • It's pronounced with the true T and the OO vowel.

  • Remind me to review with you

  • and when I was trying to think about why he would do this fully pronounced.

  • It is still unstressed, so the stress is right but by not reducing that word it sounds a little bit more formal

  • and this character is supposed to be a little bit odd

  • and so by not doing a reduction that's one way to develop that character,

  • but it is still unstressed.

  • Remind me to review, me to re... Me to re... Me to re....

  • These three syllables all flatter in pitch compared to the up-down shape

  • of the stressed syllables mind and view.

  • Remind me to review

  • Remind me to review

  • Remind me to review with you which pot is decaf, and which is regular.

  • Review with you which pot is decaf then these five words all a little bit lower in pitch.

  • Less of the up-down shape of stress.

  • Review with you which pot is decaf...

  • Review with you which pot is decaf...

  • Review with you which pot is decaf...

  • The two words pot and is are linked.

  • Which pot is... Which pot is with the flap T and that's really common when one word ends

  • in a T, a vowel or diphthong and T and the next word begins with a vowel or diphthong,

  • very common to link with a Flap T.

  • Pot is, pot is, pot is, pot is decaf.

  • ... pot is decaf

  • ...pot is decaf

  • ... pot is decaf

  • Decaf is short for decaffeinated. Decaffeinated coffee.

  • So, in the whole word de-caffeinated

  • its caf that stressed but when we shorten it for some reason the stress changes and it's de-caf

  • it's not decaf but it's de-caf so the stress changes now we have first syllable stress.

  • Also, the vowel changes it's the E vowel

  • in the word decaffeinated it's a SCHWA de-caffeinated,

  • but we can't ever have a SCHWA in a stressed syllable and so the vowel changes de-caf

  • de-caf

  • ...decaf

  • ...decaf

  • ...decaf and which is regular.

  • Decaf and which is regular. So, in the word and the D is dropped.

  • That reduction happens almost every single time you'll hear this word.

  • Sometimes the vowel reduces he doesn't, but he does drop the D in decaf, and which one is regular.

  • ...decaf and which is regular

  • ...decaf in which is regular

  • ...decaf in which is regular

  • Decaf an' which is regular.

  • Regular and his pitch does go up a little bit at the end.

  • That's not super common for statements but it does sometimes happen.

  • Here he might be doing it to soften what he's saying.

  • You know, he's basically saying

  • you messed up and I need to teach you how to do this it could also be used to say

  • in a way I can't believe that you don't know the difference why would I have to teach you this which is regular

  • ...which is regular

  • ...which is regular

  • ... which is regular

  • Okay. Fine.

  • Okay. Okay.

  • The second syllable stressed there. It's a little bit harder to hear because the audience is laughing but okay.

  • K is the one with the up-down shape, okay.

  • Okay.

  • Okay.

  • Okay. Fine.

  • Fine. Fine. A little flatter fine shows a little bit of exasperation.

  • Okay. Fine.

  • Okay. Fine.

  • Okay. Fine.

  • Okay. Fine. Gunther,

  • Gunther, Gunther

  • and it goes up in pitch first syllable stress Gun-ther.

  • She goes up in pitch because she's not done talking. She has something to say

  • and we all know it's important. So, let's hear what she has to say.

  • Gunther,

  • Gunther,

  • Gunther, you know what?

  • You know what? What's the stress there?

  • ...you know what?

  • ...you know what?

  • ...you know what?

  • You know what?

  • You know what?

  • Dah, dah, dah. Know and what are both longer and the word you is said very quickly.

  • It's actually reduced it's not you it's yu, yu, yu know what

  • and everything links together really smoothly you know what and that phrase ends with a stop T.

  • There's not a release of air.

  • ...you know what?

  • ...you know what?

  • ...you know what? I am a terrible waitress.

  • In this next sentence what are the stressed syllables?

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • So, I and terr the most stressed.

  • Am and a lower in pitch flatter everything links together smoothly.

  • I am a terr.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • Actually, I take that back I and am don't link together really there's a little lift there.

  • I am a terrible waitress and by separating those it brings a little bit more stress to it.

  • I am a terrible waitress. So, by separating it off

  • it makes it even more clear brings even more prominence to her,

  • what she is saying about herself, I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • Imma, Imma, Imma lower in pitch flatter terrible lots of stress there.

  • There's a true T and she gives it a little bit extra air to bring even more stress.

  • Whenever we exaggerate a beginning consonant it brings more stress to that word, I am a terrible.

  • I am a terrible...

  • I am a terrible...

  • I am a terrible...

  • Terrible, three syllable word with first syllable stress.

  • ...terrible

  • ...terrible

  • ...terrible waitress.

  • Waitress, waitress,

  • two syllable word, first syllable stress.

  • Do you notice anything about the T.

  • Listen to just this word.

  • ...waitress.

  • ...waitress.

  • ...waitress.

  • It actually sounds like a CH waichress, waichress.

  • ...waitress.

  • ...waitress.

  • ...waitress.

  • Do you know why I'm a terrible waitress?

  • Okay, and in the next sentence what's our stress?

  • What are our most stressed syllables?

  • Do you know why I'm a terrible waitress?

  • Do you know why I'm a terrible waitress?

  • Do you know why I'm a terrible waitress?

  • Do you know why, lots of stress on why and again stress on terr, terrible

  • and a little bit on waitress, waitress, So, these first three words flatter in pitch;

  • less important that energy leads up to that peak and why.

  • Do you know why...

  • Do you know why...

  • Do you know why I'm a terrible waitress?

  • Do you know why I am a terrible.

  • Actually, I wrote this with a contraction, but I don't hear that as I'm, I hear that as two syllables

  • I am, I am a, I am a, I am a,

  • but they all link together really smoothly I am a, I am a. They're all unstressed, flatter in pitch.

  • Not I am a, that would be all three stressed but it's I am a, I am a, I am a

  • I am a...

  • I am a...

  • I am a terrible waitress.

  • I am a terrible and then we get a big up-down shape.

  • Lots of stress after those three flatter words with the stressed word, the adjective terrible.

  • ...terrible

  • ...terrible

  • ... terrible waitress?. Because I don't care.

  • What are our most stressed syllables in this next phrase.

  • Because I don't care.

  • Because I don't care.

  • Because I don't care.

  • Because I don't, because I don't care.

  • I and care are the most stress, but all of these words are clearly pronounced.

  • Because can be reduced it's not.

  • She actually puts a quick E vowel

  • so if you look it up in the dictionary this would be an I or maybe a SCHWA

  • but sometimes when people are being extra clear or even just out of habit

  • these little unstressed syllables that have the letter E in them

  • can be pronounced with the E vowel be, be, be, because, because.

  • Because

  • Because

  • Because

  • Because second syllable stress K,

  • UH as in butter Z cuz, cuz and there is some up-down shape to that too because, because.

  • Because

  • Because

  • Because I don't care.

  • How is the word don't pronounced?

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care.

  • I'm actually going to put an up-down shape of stress on that too.

  • I really think she's stressing each one of these words for emphasis I don't care, I don't care, I don't care.

  • All of those to me feel long and with a little bit of that up-down shape.

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care.

  • I'm hearing a really subtle stop T there. I don't care, I don't care, and that tiny lift

  • signifies the T, the stop T.

  • Okay, now we get I don't care two more times. Let's listen to the pronunciation.

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care. I don't care.

  • I don't care. I don't care.

  • There I is less stressed, and it's

  • more smoothly connected as one thought instead of each word being stressed.

  • Stress on don't and more stress on care.

  • I don't care, dah, dah, dah.

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care.

  • I don't care and again a very subtle quick lift here signifying the stop T. It's definitely not,