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  • Hi!

  • It's your

  • *clap* meme

  • *clap*

  • MooOOOooOOOmmm

  • Boys and girls of every age,

  • how would you like to see

  • Woah!

  • Wait.

  • It's "wouldn't you like to see"?

  • Something strange!

  • Basically,

  • I don't know what it was about Victorian era,

  • But most of like,

  • weird,

  • sh*t

  • is usually Victorian.

  • Like usually when ... when I see something really weird and old,

  • nine out of ten cases, it's from the Victorian era.

  • And I mean, like, home decoration, fashion

  • Like, they just had so many grotesque things and I'm not sure why

  • There's just something about, like, Victorian aesthetic

  • that's like so kitsch, grimy and weird sometimes,

  • that I absolutely adore!

  • That is why today we're going to delve into

  • weird things they did with fashion.

  • Some of them are a bit overrated, I mean.

  • Sometimes you hear those things about Victorian era and you tend to believe those things

  • just because it was a long time ago and we dont really know what happened

  • And, you know, anything that's weird seems believable,

  • but it's not always the case and there's a lot of stereotype

  • including, for example, corsets,

  • that we tend to believe nowadays

  • that weren't as bad as we think they were.

  • But some of those things actually existed and,

  • I mean, if you look at them nowadays,

  • it's kind of gross.

  • So,

  • (C O U G H)

  • I'm gonna start off with things they didn't know were wrong.

  • And that, for example, was using

  • arsenic

  • as a colouring,

  • for example in clothes,

  • or, like, wallpapers.

  • It's weird because they knew it was kind of connected--

  • like, you had those cases of people

  • dying because they worked with arsenic,

  • but for some reason they didn't - it didn't quite click.

  • So there's this shade of green that's called

  • Shceele's Green

  • and it was basically arsenic

  • And the pigment was used as a coloring pigment.

  • (Is pigment always coloring?)

  • Anyway,

  • So obviously that doesn't sound like a great idea, but

  • back then it didn't really

  • like, there was a lot of chemicals that they didn't really

  • check before they use them.

  • So they were just wearing arsenic dresses.

  • So obviously that is not the best idea they ever had

  • and it's not like anyone who wore a dress like that died instantly.

  • It's more about gradually

  • intoxicating your body and if you really liked that shade of green and if you

  • surrounded yourself with items like that. For example, your wallpapers might get wet--

  • there is just some kind of chemical reaction

  • that can lead to you breathing in those chemicals it

  • and

  • it doesn't have to be that big amount of arsenic to kill you.

  • So that is why you could literally be dressed to kill! ...

  • ... yourself :)

  • So that's one thing.

  • Again, I think nowadays it's a bit stereotyped because it's such a ridiculous thing.

  • Like why would you dye your clothes with arsenic?

  • But I'm not sure to what extent it was actually

  • used and to what extent it actually caused people to die, literally.

  • But it sure affected their health heavily

  • as if there weren't enough things in the 19th century that could easily kill you.

  • So another thing, which is kind of gross, but it's also kind of cool depending on how you see

  • using

  • insects

  • as a form of decoration.

  • So basically there was this trend to decorate your dresses with beetles -- not beetles as in, like, whole

  • bugs, but they used beetle wings that actually look really cool,

  • and I can kind of see why because it looks - like the color is really vibrant.

  • (C O U G H)

  • Stop it.

  • Get some help.

  • Oh, my god, this is so good.

  • Okay, so when I first heard about this, I was kind of like that sounds gross,

  • like, why would you use pieces of insects

  • to decorate your dress and, like, what form can it even have? Like, are you gonna just put a huge beetle

  • on their chest?

  • Or like are you gonna use the legs and like put them in some sort of ornaments?

  • That's so

  • D I S T G U S T A N G

  • But then I saw the actual dresses and, boy, was I hooked. Like, they look amazing.

  • Basically, you can't really tell that those used to be

  • Insects or, like, bugs and just the color is so vibrant and so pretty and it's also shiny.

  • It's kind of like 19th-century glitter.

  • So I - I can't really blame them for wanting to use those kind of the creations.

  • The other thing though is that a lot of people did it so I can only imagine

  • that it must have affected the population of those types of beetles in 19th century.

  • But then that's not the only animal that was affected by 19th-century fashion, which I'm gonna discuss

  • in a bit!

  • (While laughing) What was that?

  • That's the kind of, like, a gross

  • Victorian trends that I can approve of, because it looks

  • gorgeous

  • And they used it very often on those, like, white cotton dresses, where you could really

  • clearly see the ... all the decoration and stuff.

  • It was kind of, like, a really nice contrast. And, funny thing is, you can still buy those yourself

  • nowadays because they're still used as the creation sometime. Basically the way they did this is they

  • had the wings and they had to, you know, drill a hole inside the wing.

  • And then they would just, kind of ..

  • koind of?

  • what was that?

  • "koind of"

  • Ugh, that's...

  • It's not even funny

  • And they would just use them as sort of beads and they would just, you know, sew them onto the dress.

  • So another thing ... it's kind of... it's not really that disgusting.

  • It's just so weird. So basically in Victorian era you

  • witness a lot of people die during your lifetime.

  • Like it was a norm to lose, like, four of your own children

  • and then lose your husband when you're, like, thirty-one or something.

  • And it was pretty common to basically

  • d i e

  • (wheeze)

  • No, but really, like, when you look at the statistics

  • the children just died like flies.

  • It was really uncommon for you to reach

  • what we nowadays call an old age.

  • And basically if you read Victorian books, it's very common to call someone who's, like, 40 an old lady.

  • So it was really different back then and because death surrounded you

  • it was just such a common thing that you

  • Tended to be in mourning a lot

  • And that's why Victorian mourning fashion was so complex and it was, you know

  • you had every detail sorted out because it was a huge part of your life. Sooner or later

  • You're gonna have to wear mourning. back then it was like a whole

  • ritual that took months and years and we had different phases of it;

  • you have different symbols also affected the fashions.

  • So for example the very first stages of mourning, you know

  • you had to wear completely black and then additional colors were added in later. One of those things that were

  • included in those kind of like early stages of mourning were like all mourning accessories, which is kind of weird.

  • But, I think it was for the people that actually missed their loving ones it, you know,

  • they felt like it's all properly done and they're respecting them in some way.

  • Whereas for people I know it sounds terrible, but I think there were plenty of people that were forced to mourn after

  • someone that they didn't necessarily miss.

  • So, for let's say you were married to a 70 years old guy and he suddenly died of a heart attack and then you were

  • forced to wear black for a couple of months and like not participate in any kind of fun events.

  • So, I think that's what made it a little bit sweeter

  • was the fact that you are allowed to have all those fancy mourning accessories. So, you'd have special brooches,

  • you would have jewelry, you would have a memorial die-cast --

  • which was something like a sort of like a very pretty card.

  • You know, remembering your beloved one.

  • That leads me to hair jewelry! Like, who wouldn't want to wear a bracelet made of your

  • loved ones hair? But they did. They use hair and

  • they made jewelry of it.

  • It was considered this kind of like somber type of jewelry. Like usually it had

  • something to do with mourning. In Poland, they used hair jewelry

  • after the January uprising failed. And it was kind of like there was this whole mourning

  • fashion trend among Polish women which was kind of like a political statement and it was supposed to be like grieving after

  • Poland basically a failed attempt to gain independence again. So that's when the hair jewelry was used extensively.

  • But in other countries, it was mostly, supposed to - it was like a mourning thing, but not

  • always because I've seen some examples where it clearly has nothing to do with mourning

  • It was just kind of like a trend. My friends showed me a bag made of hair recently and, as gross as it sounds

  • it didn't actually look that bad because when I first heard like hair jewelry

  • I was kind of like I imagine just like bracelet with like, you know, like oh, I'm gonna try and make it

  • That's what I imagined

  • right

  • Then I googled it and I was like that's actually really pretty. You actually really can't tell it's made from hair because it's

  • really

  • Intricately done. Sometimes looking at like 19th century handiwork

  • I'm like

  • there is no way anyone could ever do that nowadays because it's just so

  • tiny. That's what I feel looking at those hair jewelry pieces.

  • They usually used like small strands of hair and they would just intertwine them to make like nice

  • Ummmmmmm

  • Yeah.

  • But they also used pieces of hair like not

  • tangled at all as a form of remembering someone and that was a really long long

  • custom that nowadays, if you go to a museum, it is very common to just look at someone's

  • piece of hair, basically. Like, a lock of hair.

  • That was a thing. But, most of the time you can't really tell that it's hair because it's just so nicely done.

  • It was used in rings and bracelets. You would have a necklace made of hair

  • that wasn't anything that unusual you would have earrings with pieces of someone's hair in it.

  • As disgusting as it sounds that's actually a very like slow fashion

  • content right there. The very last thing is we're going back to killing animals for fashion!

  • Like, when it- when it comes to furs

  • I kind of understand because they didn't have any artificial sort of fabrics back then.

  • It was impossible to make something

  • warm without using natural ingredients be it either wool or, in the colder tempatures,

  • fur was the only thing that made you live.

  • So if you're, for example, from Poland to Russia, and the temperatures were like, way below zero most winters.

  • The thing was different when it came to like, decoration.

  • A lot of animals died during the 19th century for fashion, but I think the most spectacular

  • example was the way they use birds for their hats and it wasn't really a thing

  • until -- like it was a thing in the early 19th century when

  • it was popular to like, decorate your bonnets with feathers and stuff

  • but it was like, you know, you had two feathers and that was it. It wasn't until like

  • 1870s and 1880s when it was becoming more and more popular to kind of involve some sort of

  • a piece of animal on your head

  • So basically, you would have either a whole wing or in some cases

  • especially in the later 19th century like 1890s

  • you would have a whole freaking bird on your head and like I'm not saying that's weird, but that's freaking weird.

  • The thing is though. It looks pretty awesome. Like, I'm not gonna lie. I love the effect,

  • it just looks so dope. It's like, I don't know. There's just something about the whole shape and like the whole

  • proportions, but it just looks really cool with the whole silhouette.

  • But, the problem was a lot of women started doing it -

  • like, not themselves obviously, like they didn't kill birds and put them on their heads

  • No.

  • But like, you know, the more women wanted it

  • the more manufacturers had to kill the birds and it became an

  • increasing problem. In the late 19th century

  • there was actually this whole movement like women against wearing dead birds on their heads, basically.

  • Okay, that wasn't the actual name of that society, but there was a society

  • that was what I would say like grandmas of modern vegans. And they were like, "we're killing all the birds.

  • Can we stop?" And it's cool because it's kind of like, you know

  • we tend to think they didn't care or like they didn't know anything about it, and then there's this society, and

  • I even read some articles in Polish magazines from the era, like, from early 20th century.

  • I think that was where they complained about using too many feathers. They were kind of like: can we just use flowers instead?

  • Because this is getting ridiculous. I think it's really cool because it shows that in the late 19th century

  • The mindset started to change and that's all that -- what happened in 20th century.

  • But, since we're still talking Victorian, then yes; Victorian women did in fact wear birds on their hats. It's funny because

  • sometimes they make them look alive, like, the way they pose the bird on the hat would suggest it's about to, like,

  • take off and just fly away. So these are all the disgusting Victorian trends that I wanted to share with you.

  • :)))))

  • And I'm pretty sure there's more there's probably a lot more that I know myself and I forgot about

  • That's just the way I am

  • So yeah, um

  • enjoy the rest of your day,

  • and I'm gonna go and get some more of these cookies before they're all gone because

  • that sh*t was delicious

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