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  • Hey, guys.

  • So I was recently in a restaurant, staring uncomfortably at a questionable menu, a menu with such delicious items as raw guts on raw uterus.

  • Although truth be told, I was more uncomfortable by the overly enthusiastic dog asking me to put green onions and issues over the source, which isn't something I normally do when I eat out, mainly because I don't know what the hell it means.

  • But I realized I never really talk much about Japanese food.

  • When you think of Japanese food, usually think of the same old things sushi tempura, ramen, which is my favorite.

  • But obviously there's so much more food in Japan, and in today's video, I want to talk about four popular foods that might seem a bit strange or odd to most people living outside Japan.

  • I suspect one in particular might seem a bit of a surprise, considering in the UK it would be a health hazard in most countries.

  • When I told friends and family back home that I tried it, they didn't believe me, as I didn't believe it when it was served to May.

  • So keep an eye out for that.

  • No, it's not raw uterus.

  • God forbid.

  • I once went out for dinner with the Japanese friend.

  • They asked me if I wanted to try grilled eel, which in Japanese is you noggin or Kabul?

  • Hockey?

  • Naturally, I said no.

  • I went with the fried chicken instead.

  • The reason being that in the UK, the mere mention of eels sends a shudder down most people spine as it conjures up images of one of the U.

  • K's national dishes, which is jelly deals, a dish which looks and sounds bad except for the seven or eight people in the UK who still enjoy eating it.

  • So imagine my surprise when they brought out my friends meal on it not only looked edible but actually amazingly good.

  • The presentation of ill in Japan makes it look like a gourmet meal traditionally served on rice and in a sweetened soy sauce called for me.

  • It was a strong reminder that the Japanese are very good at making things look delicious and appealing where other countries fail miserably.

  • But far from being a gourmet meal, ill is the sort of thing people eat every day in Japan as it's very convenient, easy to prepare and taste bloody delicious.

  • This is what my dinner often looks like.

  • If you're wondering how eels go from this, what Thio this?

  • Oh, it looks wonderful.

  • There's a really awesome fishery called Yamada Swiss sand, and they've put up those videos showing you a how to prepare.

  • He'll be how they go about making a popular national cuisine.

  • They're actually really interesting.

  • Check out the videos in the description box below, but you can bet your horses you'll love the taste of hell.

  • Mhm.

  • Oh yeah.

  • On speaking of horses, I first tried raw horse on a trip to Nora in Kansai on I didn't enjoy it the first time, as it had quite a tough texture on a surprisingly mild, spicy aftertaste.

  • But I thought it was an exclusive thing you could only buy in certain places in Japan.

  • I told some Japanese friends that, yeah, I did some horse.

  • It was crazy.

  • It was wicked.

  • It was awesome.

  • And they were like, Yeah, you could just buy that everywhere in every Japanese pub.

  • Really brilliant.

  • I wish somebody had told me.

  • But raw horses, common lead and in Japanese is a Caires is a Kyra's, a Japanese style pub.

  • It's referred to either Izbasa, she or the more exotic name of suckered Onica.

  • Sokolow means cherry blossom blossom.

  • Sakura means cherry blossom.

  • Nicu means meat, and he got the name on account of its pink appearance.

  • Obviously, it's taboo to eat it in the U.

  • K and the U.

  • S.

  • But it's still worth trying, mainly because when you come back in, your friends and family ask, How was Japan?

  • You can reply.

  • It was amazing.

  • I ate horses and they'll be like, Oh, gosh, you really do live life on the edge, don't you?

  • Then again, the first time I ate horse in Japan was the same time that the horsemeat scandal was going on in Europe, where it turned out every piece of edible matter in Europe secretly contained horsemeat.

  • So, to be fair, if you're living in Europe, you'll probably already living life on the edge anyway.

  • Yeah, every Thursday I meet with my good Japanese Fred, not ski on.

  • We go to an is a key for dinner on a few drinks, usually more than a few drinks.

  • If not, ski, has his way on one of his favorite things.

  • The order is this stuff that looks like fried chicken, which, as you and I know one of the most delicious and nutritionally balanced foods in the world.

  • But it isn't fried chicken.

  • It's called non could soon.

  • The first time I tried it, I nearly broke my bloody teeth in half.

  • I thought someone had battered some fucking rocks and stuck them on a plate or something.

  • But it turns out none cards is chicken cartilage.

  • The best way to describe it is like a soft, chewy, bone like texture, which doesn't sound appealing.

  • But if you can get over the weird, crunchy like texture on the concept of eating chicken cartilage, the rewards of great as it's a very popular dish in his acquires, and you'll probably find it in front of you quite a lot While you're in Japan, I converted from actively avoiding it, to loving it within the period of about six months due to going out with Nazi every week.

  • So if you do struggle to come to enjoy it, as I did when I first arrived in Japan, you best get signed up to not ski six month cartilage enjoyment programas Well, what program it would be Wow, I have a money.

  • Like most people growing up, I had it hammered into me that raw chicken equals bad or, to be precise, raw chicken, equal salmonella.

  • So when I had Tory Sashi served to me, which is raw chicken.

  • I was a little bit a little bit worried, but despite my concerns, I went ahead.

  • Ate it.

  • Andi lived to tell the tale.

  • Admittedly, I didn't actually enjoy eating it due to the texture being a bit on the flavor.

  • Well, there was no flavor, but if they were cool to eat something that I felt like I should have.

  • The raw chicken in Japan comes from chickens that especially raised no battery farmed.

  • So apparently the risk of salmonella is really low.

  • So if you get the chance to try it, don't be put off by the health risks.

  • It's perfectly safe, and you can find it.

  • It is a kai's throughout Japan, although I won't be eating it in a hurry.

  • Let's face it, it's got nothing on fried chicken.

  • But what I will say about Japanese food is it's always excellently prepared on the Japanese, really, our culinary masters.

  • They treat every aspect of cooking and making food with such great craftsmanship and skill.

  • Even food that initially looks or sounds questionable is always delicious.

  • Well, everything, that is, except Roy Uterus, which I 100% refused to try.

  • You certainly won't catch me pouring in the issues over the source anytime soon.

  • But have you tried any interesting or bizarre foods whilst in Japan?

  • Let us know in the comments section below, please don't forget to hit the like button.

  • If you want more videos and I apologize for the overuse of the phrase raw uterus, it won't happen again probably.

Hey, guys.

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B1 raw japanese chicken uterus fried chicken cartilage

4 Unusual Must Try Japanese Foods

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/15
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