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  • And in this video I'm going to focus on the two consonant sounds ch /tʃ/ and /t/ in English.

  • I know they may sound similar but they are actually different.

  • And they are very important.

  • So I want you to be able to hear the difference and pronounce them correctly.

  • Let's take two example words.

  • The first word is the word 'chip'.

  • I suppose you can hear the 'ch' /tʃ/ sound.

  • 'chip'

  • The second word is 'tip'.

  • In this case, it's a 't' sound.

  • 'tip'

  • So 'chip'

  • and 'tip'.

  • I know it may be difficult for you to hear the difference,

  • but with practice, you will be able to pronounce them correctly.

  • So let's keep going.

  • Well first, guys, you need to know how to make the 'ch' /tʃ/ and 't' /t/ sounds in English.

  • And to help you you've got the IPA spelling - very important.

  • You can also watch how I move my mouth.

  • And of course always repeat after me in this video.

  • You can make those sounds, guys.

  • So let's do it.

  • First let's learn how to make this 't' /t/ sound.

  • The 't' /t/ sound in English.

  • It's unvoiced.

  • So you are not going to use your voice.

  • You are not going to feel vibration in your throat.

  • You're just going to push out some air.

  • And for this, your tongue is going to be forward against your top teeth.

  • And then you're going to push out some air. And your tongue is going to go down.

  • Okay.

  • /t/

  • Please try and do it. Repeat after me.

  • /t/

  • Let's practice with the word 'tip'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • tip

  • tip

  • tip

  • Good.

  • Let's now focus on the 'ch' /tʃ/ sound in English.

  • It's slightly different.

  • It's also unvoiced.

  • So no vibration in your throat, play.

  • But this time your tongue is going to be up there.

  • It's not going to move and you're going to release a lot of air.

  • So /tʃ/.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • /tʃ/

  • Let's practice with the word 'chip'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • chip

  • chip

  • chip

  • Good.

  • Let's now practice with minimal pairs.

  • Words that sound practically the same, but the sounds are actually different.

  • Very useful for you to hear the difference between the two sounds.

  • First, let's focus on the sounds themselves.

  • Please watch my mouth and repeat after me.

  • First, the 't' /t/ sound.

  • /t/

  • Then the 'ch' /tʃ/ sound. Repeat after me.

  • /tʃ/

  • Let's do both. Please repeat after me.

  • /t/

  • /tʃ/

  • /t/

  • /tʃ/

  • /t/

  • /tʃ/

  • And finally, let's practice with our words.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • tip

  • chip

  • tip

  • chip

  • tip

  • chip

  • Good job, guys. Moving on.

  • Okay, students.

  • Time to go through minimal pairs together.

  • Please watch how I move my mouth.

  • And repeat after me. Let's get started.

  • arch

  • art

  • batch

  • bat

  • beach

  • beat

  • belch

  • belt

  • bench

  • bent

  • bitch

  • bit

  • blotch

  • blot

  • botch

  • bot

  • catch

  • cat

  • chair

  • tear

  • chap

  • tap

  • char

  • tar

  • chart

  • tart

  • cheat

  • teat

  • cheek

  • teak

  • cheer

  • tear

  • cheese

  • tease

  • chest

  • test

  • chew

  • too

  • chick

  • tick

  • chide

  • tide

  • child

  • tiled

  • chill

  • till

  • chime

  • time

  • chin

  • tin

  • chip

  • tip

  • choke

  • toke

  • choose

  • twos

  • chop

  • top

  • chore

  • tore

  • chose

  • toes

  • chubby

  • tubby

  • chug

  • tug

  • churn

  • turn

  • coach

  • coat

  • each

  • eat

  • flinch

  • flint

  • hatch

  • hat

  • hitch

  • hit

  • hooch

  • hoot

  • hunch

  • hunt

  • hutch

  • hut

  • itch

  • it

  • lynch

  • lint

  • march

  • mart

  • match

  • mat

  • much

  • mutt

  • notch

  • not

  • ouch

  • out

  • patch

  • pat

  • parch

  • part

  • peach

  • peat

  • perch

  • pert

  • pitch

  • pit

  • porch

  • port

  • pouch

  • pout

  • punch

  • punt

  • rich

  • writ

  • roach

  • wrote

  • Scotch

  • Scot

  • starch

  • start

  • teach

  • teat

  • torch

  • taught

  • torch

  • tort

  • touch

  • tut

  • twitch

  • twit

  • watch

  • what

  • which

  • wit

  • wrench

  • rent

  • Good, guys.

  • Okay, guys time to practice with a few sentences containing the consonant sounds.

  • The first sentence is,

  • 'The chime tells the time.'

  • Repeat after me.

  • 'The chime tells the time.'

  • Second sentence.

  • 'The mutt had much time to catch the cat.'

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'The mutt had much time to catch the cat.'

  • And finally,

  • 'Each child eats and chews, too.'

  • Repeat after me.

  • 'Each child eats and chews, too.'

  • Very good. Moving on.

  • Let's now move on to listening practice.

  • I'm now going to show you two words.

  • I will say one of the two words and I want you to listen very carefully

  • and to tell me if this word is 'a' or 'b'. Let's get started.

  • Let's take a look at our first two words.

  • Now which one do I say 'a' or 'b'?

  • Listen to me very carefully.

  • 'beat'

  • One more time.

  • 'beat'

  • Now is it 'a' or is it 'b'?

  • What do you think?

  • It's 'b', 'beat'.

  • 'a' is pronounced 'beach'.

  • The next two words.

  • 'churn'

  • 'churn'

  • 'a' or 'b'?

  • It's 'a', guys, 'churn'.

  • 'b' would be 'turn'.

  • What about now?

  • 'pitch'

  • 'pitch'

  • It's 'a', 'pitch'.

  • 'b' would be pronounced 'pit'.

  • Listen to me.

  • 'wrote'

  • 'wrote'

  • It's 'b', 'wrote'.

  • 'a' is 'roach'.

  • Listen to me guys.

  • 'peat'

  • 'peat'

  • 'a' or 'b'?

  • It's 'b', 'peat'.

  • 'a' would be 'peach'.

  • 'cheese'

  • 'cheese'

  • It's 'a' of course, 'cheese'.

  • 'b' is 'tease'.