Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Welcome to Wednesday`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • You are half way through the week. I`m Carl Azuz, it`s good to see you.

  • First up today, there are about 32,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan, plus those of some U.S. allies.

  • President Obama announced yesterday that almost 10,000 American troops would stay in Afghanistan through next year.

  • Their role is changing, though.

  • The president says the U.S. combat mission ends this year, remaining troops will be focused on training Afghan forces and fighting al Qaeda terrorists.

  • Afghanistan`s got to agree to U.S. troops staying, though.

  • It`s current president Hamid Karzai won`t, but the two political candidates competing to succeed him say they will.

  • Some Republican lawmakers say they are glad the U.S. will keep some troops in Afghanistan, but that putting dates on their withdrawal could lead to violence afterward.

  • The U.S. official says U.S. forces in Afghanistan will be reduced to about 1,000 after the year 2016.

  • Republican lawmakers are considering significant changes to a child nutrition law passed in 2010.

  • The law`s goal was to encourage students to eat healthier school lunches.

  • The government required schools to use less sodium in meals and it required students who qualify for free or reduced price meals, about 30 million students nationwide,

  • to pick up a fruit or vegetable with their lunch.

  • First lady Michelle Obama is a strong supporter of the law.

  • Parents have a right to expect that their kids will get decent food in our schools, and we all have a right to expect that our hard-earned taxpayer dollars won`t be spent on junk food for our kids.

  • But an official from the School Nutrition Association says they are not pushing for junk food in lunches,

  • they just want the fruit or vegetable requirement dropped.

  • The group says there is a lot of waste from students picking what they have to get the fee meal,

  • but then immediately throwing it away.

  • Next story involves planes and law enforcement.

  • Technology that has been around may be a little after the Wright brothers is combining with camera surveillance technology,

  • and it`s getting policy in apprehend and tracking some crime suspects.

  • Not everyone`s on board with the idea of pursuing people using an eye in the sky, but it is having an impact.

  • From their specially equipped Cessnas Ross McNutt and his firm Persistent Surveillance Systems can monitor large sections of cities.

  • Because they are in the air for hours at a time, they can track back to the moment of a crime and before it. (INAUDIBLE).

  • They meet up three to four times prior to the murder, including one time right outside the murder scene.

  • In the moments afterward ...

  • We actually can follow all of the cars, so we are actually going to jump over and follow the car that the shooter got into and see where it goes to.

  • They tie in a Google Earth street view image to show police the house where the suspect went to hide.

  • McNutt`s team helped police make arrest in that shooting.

  • We`ve actually (INAUDIBLE) 34 murders so far, and we actually have confessions that account for 75.

  • McNutt`s team has monitored other high crime cities.

  • Campton, California, Philadelphia, Baltimore. Then can replicate their operation center in Dayton, Ohio - anywhere.

  • In a typical operation, law enforcement officers will sit in this area monitoring the police scanner.

  • When a call comes in that a crime has been committed, these analysts immediately start to track back when and where it occurred.

  • And sometimes, they can catch up to a suspect in real time.

  • Dayton, 2012. They get word of a burglary.

  • Track the suspect in the white truck as he`s getting away, and direct police right to him. Dayton`s police chief says the technology`s helped his depleted force.

  • Allows us to gain data on, criminal offenses, for which there are often or not witnesses and clearly, police officers are not there to prevent.

  • But privacy advocates say this smacks of Big Brother.

  • Then we`ve actually crossed the line.

  • This creates the opportunity after the fact to look at anybody for any reason.

  • We are responding in support of law enforcement to reported crimes only.

  • And McNutt says, they closely monitor their own analysts to make sure they are only tracking suspects.

  • Time for the Shoutout. Who made the first solo flight around the world? If you think you know it, shout it out!

  • Was it Wiley Post, Charles Lindbergh, Eddie Rickenbacker or Chuck Yeager?

  • You might not be familiar with Wiley Post, but he made history in July of 1933 with the first solo flight around the world.

  • That`s you answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • That was back in the Golden Age of aviation.

  • A time period between World Wars One and Two when tremendous achievements were made in flight.

  • Charles Lindbergh`s trans-Atlantic solo in 1927, Emilia Earhart`s trans- Atlantic solo in 1932.

  • Records were made, then broken, then broken again.

  • And now, a 19-year old is hoping to fly in the history, kind of like Wiley Post did.

  • On Wednesday, Guthmiller will hop aboard its 1981 beach craft A-36 Bonanza in hopes of becoming the youngest person to fly solo around the world.

  • He says he was inspired after 21-year old Jack Wiegand of Fresno completed the trip last spring.

  • Wiegand currently holds the Guinness world record.

  • st spring. Wiegand currently holds the Guinness world record.

  • You know, I always played flight simulator games growing up, always wanted to go eat of the airport cafe and watch planes take off and land.

  • Guthmiller told us that trip should take him about 40 days or 160 hours of flying time.

  • He plans to make about 20 stops on five continents and update his status on social media along the way.

  • The young pilot says, when he shared his interest in flying with his parents, they didn`t think he`d take it this far.

  • You know, I think at the time, they thought I was just going to do this a little 20 minutes like get it out of my system.

  • And now, three years later, I`m going to go fly solo around the world.

  • Although Guthmiller has his eyes on earning a spot in the history books,

  • he says he hopes the trip will inspire other young people to follow their dreams.

  • Roll call. Time to stamp some passports. It`s Worldwide Wednesday.

  • Hello at everyone at the AAS Moscow High School.

  • They are watching CNN STUDENT NEWS from the Russian capital.

  • Spinning the globe now to Vietnam.

  • At the Singapore international school, we`ve got some viewers in Da Nang, and at the Hong Kong Academy,

  • thanks for taking ten minutes for us, it`s good to have you watching in Hong Kong.

  • There`s a modified form of baseball called beep baseball.

  • It`s for blind or visually impaired people.

  • Some rules are different, and the balls on bases beep, so players no where they are.

  • A woman named Judy Byrd was watching a game one day when she asked,

  • if the same idea could help kids play kickball?

  • Her nonprofit association says beep kickball is now played in more than 50 camps and schools for the blind.

  • Let`s play ball!

  • Each one of these kids is visually impaired,

  • but it doesn`t stop them from kicking, running and sliding into base.

  • They are playing beep kickball.

  • Beep kickball is an adapted sport to kids who are visually impaired one,

  • and it`s played with three pieces of equipment.

  • A kickball, which is two bases for each - and de Blanco.

  • All the kids were blindfold to equalize the differences in Vision.

  • Beep kickball founder Judy Byrd says the rules are simple.

  • Catch the ball and be run to the (INAUDIBLE) that it`s buzzing.

  • His job is to catch before one of the - now that the field - look at the ball and kick it up.

  • 11-year old Christopher Abel was born blind, and says he loves everything about beep kickball.

  • It`s not even when you go (INAUDIBLE) with the ball, then you know it is going flying and like running - to get one of the times than I just get to run as fast as I can as hard as I can.

  • Like tackling the bases, because it`s just so fun to hit it.

  • I`m not going to - I`m like feel thing.

  • Because it`s always just amazing when you pick up the ball and say I got it before the runner could get the base.

  • Coach Melissa Allen says the benefits go beyond the physical.

  • The sport itself, it gives the kids a lot of confidence, a lot of times vision-impaired students are not able to play a lot of athletic team sports.

  • For him it`s just a running. It`s getting used to with him being blind.

  • Run it at an area where he`s not going to run into something,

  • he`s not going to collide with anybody, you know, so he can just run as fast as he wants without worrying about if he`s going to hit a wall or tip over something.

  • It`s just so exciting: running to the bases, hitting it, knocking it over - there`s nothing bad about it.

  • And for this young team, having fun is exactly what it`s all about.

  • For Taylor Crofton senior prom came and went without her dad.

  • He`s in the U.S. Air Force and was deployed to Cuba for months. Graduation also started without him, but it didn`t stay that way.

  • Sergeant Chris Crofton was there in more than spirit.

  • He rushed onstage as Taylor was about to receive her diploma.

  • The surprise made the event even more memorable for her whole family.

  • Sergeant Crofton has been away on nine deployments since Taylor was a baby.

  • He says he`s missed birthdays, Christmas celebrations, he wasn`t going to miss this.

  • I`m just so happy he`s here. Better than a - than anything.

  • So, yes, that`s all I wanted for graduation.

  • So, her graduation wasn`t too soon for a reunion.

  • Who knew a hug will be part of our walk? It was a great way to commence spending time with the family and it helps us wrap today`s show with a little class.

  • CNN STUDENT NEWS returns tomorrow.

Welcome to Wednesday`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

May 28 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

  • 1768 40
    VoiceTube posted on 2014/05/25
Video vocabulary