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  • How you interview for a job will determine whether or not you get hired.

  • Well, I like to think that I haven't already decided but I've already, at least,

  • started to form an opinion that's negative.

  • What caused this businessman to form a negative opinion?

  • Clothing.

  • What you will you wear to your next job interview?

  • This may seem like a shallow question, but as I interviewed experts,

  • I realized it's definitely a very important thing to consider.

  • Before you even open your mouth for the first time,

  • you will have begun your first impression with the way you visually present yourself.

  • In today's video, we'll sit down with three experts to discuss how to prepare yourself for an interview.

  • From planning what you wear to maintaining your rituals on the day of the interview.

  • Let's make sure you have the best interview possible.

  • For my non-native English students, there will also be a brief lesson at the end about how to ask

  • for the bathroom.

  • The first thing I want to talk about is your outfit.

  • I asked two people who've done a lot of hiring

  • and they both said, the way you present yourself, which includes your outfit, matters a lot.

  • In fact, the wrong outfit might prevent you from getting the job.

  • Even before you start the interview.

  • First impressions matter.

  • I asked a local businessman, Steve, who does a lot of hiring for his business,

  • how far into an interview he knows if he'll consider hiring someone.

  • Listen to what he said.

  • How long into an interview of somebody do you feel like you start to have a sense of: yes,

  • I will go forward with this person.

  • Oh boy, I would say, it's probably as quick as maybe five minutes.

  • And sometimes, it's even that opinion has formed even before.

  • It can be as early as before you even got it into the room.

  • I could be in the foyer and in the hallway where you're meeting that person.

  • I hate to admit that but yeah, it can be really quick, and really early.

  • So you have literally called someone for an interview met them as they walked in the door and

  • already decided there's something about this person that's not going to work out.

  • Well, I like to think that I haven't already decided but I've already, at least,

  • started to form an opinion that's negative.

  • And what led to that?

  • It's terrible to say, but I'd say appearance.

  • It is a huge first impression.

  • If I have somebody that's coming into an interview and they're wearing a hoodie and sneakers,

  • I'm forming a negative opinion of them that they haven't prepared, and that they

  • don't care about what impression they're going to be giving in my office, in my environment.

  • What you wear gives an impression of how much you care about and have prepared for this interview.

  • If you've been offered an interview, that means they already like you,

  • but you can be sure you're not the only one being interviewed for that position.

  • The minute someone sees you, what you're wearing and your body language is communicating for you.

  • Make sure those things are saying what you want them to say.

  • We'll get into body language later in the course, but first let's go a little deeper on outfit.

  • So how do know how dressy to go in an interview?

  • Let's hear Steve's advice.

  • We don't walk around in jeans and a t-shirt or have that extremely laid-back feel to our organization.

  • And our...I think it's possthat could be fine in some organizations, but in ours

  • our community would not see that as being a professional appearance.

  • And so maybe that, part of that is knowing where you're interviewing and what that culture is like,

  • and that could be as simple as asking someone when you're, when you're setting up that interview.

  • When that person is setting up the interview, ask them that question.

  • What's your, what's your dress code like?

  • So you can get a good idea what that is.

  • Just ask.

  • When someone contacts you to set up the interview, ask them, “What's the dress code for your organization?”

  • The person you're communicating with at this point will likely be impressed that you're researching,

  • trying to know the organization and what's expected.

  • And if you're ever not sure, it's better to err on the side of being slightly more dressy than underdressed.

  • You might feel like you want to wear something really memorable.

  • They're interviewing lots of people, right?

  • You want them to remember you.

  • But not for what you wore.

  • If they're remembering what you wore, they might not be remembering what

  • stands out about you as an employee,

  • and that's what we want them to be thinking about as they're making their decisions.

  • I spoke with a career advisor, Laura, who works at a prestigious college here in the US.

  • Listen to what she had to say:

  • What advice do you give students who are going to an interview about clothing choice,

  • and appearance, and that kind of thing?

  • The first thing I say is to not wear anything that draws too much attention to you.

  • You want the employer to be focused on what you're saying, and the connection that you're making,

  • and not on what you're wearing.

  • Also not on a scent that's too strong, or a hair that's out of place.

  • So you just want to look at yourself in the mirror before you go and say: Do I look, you know, slightly boring,

  • honestly, because you're wanting them to focus on what you're saying, and um,

  • and so that's one thing is to be thinking, you don't want anything to be distracting.

  • I also spoke with a woman, Cindy, who has worked as an Executive director for a non-profit in New York City.

  • She has literally interviewed hundreds of people, and she agrees:  keep your clothing simple.

  • Simple.

  • I wouldn't wear fancy anything. I would keep the distractions minimal.

  • If you normally wear earrings, I think

  • it's fine to wear earrings, if you don't, I wouldn't add anything you don't normally wear.

  • So there's nothing that you don't feel, sort of,

  • different from how you normally feel, and that helps people feel comfortable in their skin.

  • She also makes a good point:  you don't know what the seating situation will be in an interview,

  • so you'll want to think about that as you're choosing your outfit.

  • I would wear something that you feel comfortable in, like,

  • ahead of time, sitting, if you're wearing a very short skirt, that can be super awkward.

  • If you, depending on where you're interviewing. So for example,

  • I used to do a lot of interviews in my office, and on a couch in my office.

  • So if somebody sat down into the couch,

  • it made it a very hard position for--

  • Now, I usually wouldn't sit on a couch because it was sort of awkward, but

  • like it could make it a really awkward place to sit if you didn't have on clothes that coverage or your legs enough.

  • And then that would be something that was distracting to you, and possibly to the interviewer, for the interview.

  • Same thing with anything that's low-cut, if you're sitting slightly below somebody, like

  • you just don't know what the situation is going to be, so you're going to be as

  • comfortable in the clothes that you're wearing as you can, and know that

  • like, however you might be sitting, you're going to be covered and feel comfortable.

  • So if you don't have an outfit that's very clean, simple, dressy, that you feel comfortable in,

  • it's worth investing in one as you start your job interview process.

  • Plan it ahead, wear it a few times.

  • Don't let your job interview be the very first time you wear something new.

  • Make sure you know that you're comfortable in it.

  • You know what?

  • You look amazing in that outfit.

  • Now let's talk about your ritual.

  • Let me tell you a little personal story.

  • My husband and I were set up by a mutual friend.

  • The first date went pretty well, and so I was kind of nervous for the second date.

  • I was meeting him for brunch in the morning, and before that, I met with a friend for coffee.

  • I don't drink coffee.

  • But for some reason, that morning, I ordered it.

  • And I was so jittery and had such a stomach ache, that I couldn't eat brunch at all on our date.

  • It was awkward because I had significantly changed my ritual.

  • When we're nervous, we can make weird decisions without thinking them through.

  • This can definitely happen when you're preparing something as major as a job interview.

  • Let's listen to Laura's advice.

  • Do you have any advice for people about what to do the night before an interview?

  • And then maybe like 15 minutes before the interview, as far as preparing and feeling relaxed?

  • The night before the interview, you should not do anything different than you would normally do.

  • So if you are normally going to bed at 10:00 p.m., go to bed at 10:00 p.m..

  • Try not to cram your studying,

  • or your research into that very last night, you should be done with your preparations by the night before,

  • so that you can just relax, you can eat a nice dinner, you can go to bed on time, and then the next morning,

  • drink the same amount of coffee.

  • If you normally eat breakfast, eat breakfast. If you don't, don't.

  • Just to kind of try to keep the routine and so that nothing's out of order, and you feel a little off.

  • And then 15 minutes before the interview, you should already be there.

  • So give yourself plenty of time.

  • You don't want to be late, that's the first point against you if you show up in an interview late.

  • And then once you're there, I always, personally, I go to the bathroom and just take a moment to relax in there,

  • and just, you know, make sure that nothing is weird about my hair, that no collars are turned under.

  • Just giving myself a once-over, and taking some time to breathe without anyone watching me.

  • And then going out into the waiting room, or wherever you're waiting for the employer,

  • taking some deep breaths, and trying as much as possible from your belly instead of your chest,

  • cause we can have really shallow breathing through our chest. But you're taking it in through your belly,

  • and breathing out, it's amazing what a few deep breaths can do for you.

  • So take a calming deep breath and prepare your body for that interview.

  • We've just talked about preparing yourself, but it's also really important to prepare for connection

  • with your organization and the person you're interviewing with.

  • In the next two videos, we'll talk about how to do this by proper research,

  • mock interviews, and thinking about your body language.

  • The person interviewing you will know if you've prepared the right way or notso make sure you have.

  • For my non-native students, we're going to get your English lesson in just a minute.

  • If you haven't already, be sure to click the subscribe button and the bell for notifications.

  • I make new videos on the English language

  • and American culture every Tuesday

  • and have over 600 videos on my channel to date

  • focusing on listening comprehension and accent reduction.

  • While you're waiting for next week's video, a great next step would be to check out thisget started playlist.”

  • And now, the English lesson.

  • Let's talk about the bathroom.

  • I've noticed this can be confusing for some because there is no bath in bathrooms in public spaces.

  • A term that might be more familiar to you is 'the toilet'.

  • Laura talks about going to the bathroom before an interview to give yourself one final check in the mirror,

  • and to have just a moment to focus before the interview starts:

  • I always, personally, I go to the bathroom and just take a moment to relax in there,

  • and just, you know, make sure that nothing is weird about my hair, that no collars are turned under.

  • Just giving myself a once-over, and taking some time to breathe without anyone watching me.

  • She goes to the bathroom, the room with the bath.

  • No.

  • There's no bath, it's just a toilet and a sink.

  • But even though 'toilet' is a common term elsewhere, native speakers in the US don't use it.

  • We much prefer to say 'bathroom' or 'restroom',

  • either one of those is great, common, natural.

  • If you say 'toilet', it's a little odd here in the US.

  • So, if you walk in for an interview early, and you have a little time to collect yourself, you can ask,

  • Excuse me, could you tell me where the bathroom is?”

  • Orcould you tell me where the restroom is?”

  • That's a wonderful and polite way to ask.

  • That's it, and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

How you interview for a job will determine whether or not you get hired.

Subtitles and keywords

A2 BEG interview wear bathroom outfit interviewing job interview

What to Wear to a Job Interview – How to Prepare for a Job Interview – Job Interview Tips

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    Summer   posted on 2020/10/13
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