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  • - Is that mean?

  • I shouldn't say that (laughs) oh my god.

  • People are gonna be like I'm not going to her, she's judgy.

  • - [Woman] No!

  • (percussive music)

  • Hi guys, my name is Dr. Cindy Bae,

  • I'ma board-certified dermatologist

  • at the Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York.

  • I also teach residents at NYU Department of Dermatology.

  • There's so many podcasts, websites, blogs

  • about skincare, everyone's an expert nowadays,

  • so I'm here to give the official rule.

  • (percussive music)

  • So I do recommend a cleansing method to my patients,

  • especially at bedtime, because throughout the day,

  • you've been exposed to pollution, debris, oils,

  • your sunscreen, everything that's built up

  • so absolutely you need to remove all of that.

  • So if you need to use a makeup cloth, use it.

  • If you need to use an oil balm, use it,

  • and then follow it up with a cleanser and then

  • if you need an astringent or a toner to remove

  • any further residue, use that, and then moisturize.

  • And if you wanna get fancy and add extra steps,

  • you can add a serum, an ampule, a booster,

  • there's so many things you can add to your skincare regimen.

  • So Hannah Y comments, "my dermatologist said

  • "to never use scrubs," and someone commented,

  • "not harsh ones like sugar, salt, nut shells, et cetera,

  • "but gentle scrubs."

  • So there's truth to both points.

  • You wanna be very gentle with your skin,

  • because if you are harsh, you can cause micro-tears

  • and irritation in your skin, so you wanna be gentle

  • and if you want that exfoliation from a scrub,

  • you can also use chemical ones too.

  • There are many different products with acids in them

  • that help remove debris and sticky skin

  • so that you get a nice exfoliant experience.

  • All right, so Kat F asks "your face feels tight,

  • "the product is too harsh for you, what?

  • "Like every product I've ever used has done that

  • "for me and I thought it's normal

  • "and you just moisturize well after, dang."

  • So Kat F is actually correct.

  • If your face feels too tight, it is probably

  • a little too harsh for you and let's go back

  • to the science behind that.

  • That just means that your soap that you're using

  • is alkaline, so your pH is a little bit higher.

  • Our skin is a little bit acidic at a pH

  • of about 5.4, 5.5, so when you use an alkaline product,

  • your face can feel tight and dry and that actually

  • affects the skin barrier, so it is probably

  • too harsh for you.

  • So Kat F, great point.

  • Okay, so Brisel Cabrera comments "micellar water and toner

  • "are not in any shape, way, or form the same thing.

  • "Micellar water is stripping everything

  • "away from your skin and is taking away

  • "your natural oils and is actually

  • "throwing off your pH balance.

  • "Toner restores your pH balance.

  • "If you're going to use micellar water,

  • "make sure to use a toner after it."

  • So there's some good information, some incorrect information

  • and some confusing information in this comment.

  • So historically the reason why we use toners

  • is because a lot of people use soaps,

  • alkaline soaps that were harsh and they left residues

  • and that's why we followed up that cleansing with a toner.

  • So nowadays we're much more sophisticated

  • in our formulations, and so we don't really need

  • a toner for that purpose, and you can see

  • that toners come in a variety of formulations,

  • ones to hydrate and ones to actually remove

  • the extra debris, so micellar water is actually,

  • it's just soap dispensed in a water solution

  • that's gentle enough to remove stubborn makeup

  • and oil-based sunscreens, stuff like that on your face.

  • So yes, micellar water and toner are not the same thing

  • but toner also comes in a variety of forms

  • so you can't, it's like comparing apples and oranges.

  • They're not the same, but micellar water

  • won't really strip everything, it will just help

  • remove stubborn things like waterproof mascara

  • in a gentle manner.

  • Sophie Kilmer comments "never use a scrub

  • "next to your eyes, Christ."

  • So (laughs) you have to be gentle 'cause the skin

  • around your eyes is much thinner than the rest

  • of your skin and body.

  • I don't think you need to absolutely completely avoid it

  • as long as you're gentle with it.

  • (percussive music)

  • So serums actually help deliver nutrients

  • or active ingredients to the skin.

  • It's very concentrated so you don't need that much

  • and you'll see that they're sold in smaller bottles.

  • There are so many products out there on the market,

  • serums, boosters, ampules, and basically

  • their function is to deliver nutrients to your skin

  • or active ingredients like antioxidants

  • and phytonutrients and vitamins,

  • so that's what you can use to you know,

  • add oomph to your skincare routine.

  • Cubicle comments "he has sensitive skin prone to redness

  • "and he used a serum full of fragrance,

  • "phyto-corrective gel, L-ohh-L."

  • If you have sensitive skin, you shouldn't use

  • a bunch of products or you should really look

  • at the ingredients and see if there's

  • a common denominator of a certain ingredient

  • that makes you sensitive and avoid it.

  • Fragrance is added to some skincare products

  • just to mask some unpleasant smells from the formulation,

  • but it's also added to make it seem very fancy and nice,

  • so that you'll use it.

  • Sometimes you can actually react to fragrances,

  • especially if you have sensitive skin,

  • so if you are one of those people who have sensitive skin,

  • make sure you look at products and look for

  • hypoallergenic or fragrance-free.

  • Oh my gosh (laughs) Jackson Stacy,

  • wow, you're observant: "anyone notice she didn't

  • "put a moisturizer on after the HA serum?"

  • So what, what if she didn't need it?

  • What if she's in some humid environment

  • where it's full of moisture?

  • You don't know, you don't always have

  • to use a moisturizer, especially if you have

  • oily-prone skin or if you just use an HA serum

  • that helps moisturize.

  • You know hyaluronic acid is a moisturizer,

  • so don't judge.

  • (percussive music)

  • Common actives, so active ingredients like retinoids,

  • vitamin C, anything that we know has an effect on the skin.

  • There's cosmoceuticals and drugs and the difference

  • between that is that cosmoceuticals are like

  • adorning the skin, but drugs actually affect

  • the structure and function of skin.

  • So sometimes that line can be blurred too.

  • Gymnasmic says "so uh, why do no celebrities

  • "use Tretinoin, when it's literally the only substance

  • "on earth that the FDA has confirmed

  • "is effective for anti-aging?"

  • I think some celebrities are in the know with skincare

  • and probably do use Tretinoin, because a lot of them

  • do see a board-certified dermatologist,

  • but you do make a good point, a lot of,

  • many people should be on a retinoid unless you're pregnant

  • or breastfeeding, it's actually really good for the skin.

  • It treats acne, prevents acne, prevents fine lines,

  • helps with the appearance of your pores,

  • so it's wonderful, so if you're not using it, use it.

  • A retinol is just vitamin A, so there's all

  • these different derivatives and ultimately

  • the main ingredient that's active in our skin

  • is retinoic acid, and so Tretinoin is a type

  • of retinoic acid or retinoid which mimics

  • vitamin A activity, and there's actually one

  • that's over the counter that used to be prescription.

  • I do not get a kickback from this, but it's Differin Gel

  • and it's only $12.99, the biggest beauty bargain.

  • So Nina El comments, "there's a lot of people

  • "who are in their 50s and 60s now

  • "who have been using retin-A since their teens.

  • "Keeps 80% of wrinkles at bay

  • but sagging happens regardless."

  • So, you're sort of right, yep.

  • It does help with wrinkles, I don't know where you got

  • the 80% but that's very supportive

  • of using retinoids, which I applaud.

  • But sagging does happen because there's gravity,

  • time, things like that that make things naturally fall.

  • Retinoids have been around since probably the 1980s

  • because that's when isotretinoin, otherwise known

  • as Accutane, was FDA-approved for the use of acne.

  • So Shormee Sohani says "I thought we should not

  • "use retinol and vitamin C together."

  • So it depends, it all depends on formulation,

  • the stability of these active ingredients,

  • sometimes when you add ingredients together

  • that are active, it can cause irritation or dryness

  • to your skin, so you just have to try.

  • Basically the reason why we say not to mix

  • a lot of things together is because one,

  • we don't want them to cancel out or two,

  • we don't want your skin to be irritated.

  • Barking Spider comments, "if you're going to use a retinol,

  • "don't wash your face with SA, salicylic acid, prior.

  • "Very surprised that wasn't mentioned by her."

  • I wanna ask Barking Spider why he thinks that,

  • or she thinks that.

  • I don't think it really matters to that degree.

  • We know salicylic acid, it frosts when we use it

  • as a peel, it's very quick in its action,

  • so maybe you're commenting on that you don't want

  • your skin to be irritated because both are being used,

  • but if your skin's used to it, which it can get

  • a tolerance to some products, it should be okay.

  • (percussive music)

  • Moisturizing is important because we want

  • to prevent water loss in our skin,

  • so we call that transepidermal water loss

  • and so when we lose too much water, our skin gets dry,

  • irritated, we lose our barrier that protects us

  • from bacteria, microorganisms, things like that,

  • so we wanna maintain a good moisture barrier.

  • Itzel Lopez says "basically coconut oil

  • "is working as a moisturizer."

  • Great, if it works for you, keep using it.

  • There's different types of moisturizers.

  • There's oils like petroleum jelly,

  • there's vegetable oils, there's oils like coconut oil

  • in that category, there's waxes like beeswax,

  • dimethicone like silicones, so if coconut oil

  • is working for Itzel Lopez, rock on.

  • The comment is "does anyone know of an eye cream

  • "that actually brightens up the darkness under your eyes?"

  • Eye creams are great in that they moisturize your skin.

  • I don't think that there's a magic wand eye cream out there

  • otherwise there wouldn't be so many different types

  • of eye creams and different types of procedures

  • to treat problems like darkness under your eyes.

  • So the darkness under your eyes can be caused

  • by so many different things.

  • One, you could have a loss of volume of soft tissue,

  • of bone, or you can have blood vessels underneath

  • 'cause the skin is thin so it's not very good

  • at camouflaging the blood vessels,

  • so it's multifactorial, or it could be pigment.

  • You can maybe have some melasma there or some sun damage

  • so it really depends.

  • There's no eye cream that fixes everything,

  • so I think you need to figure out what it is you're seeing

  • and then address that problem.

  • If it's volume loss, you can use soft tissue filler.

  • If it's pigment, you can use vitamin C,

  • like an eye cream with vitamin C to lighten up

  • the skin there, so it really depends.

  • Okay, so "moisturizer then oil.

  • "Small molecules, typically found in serums first,

  • "biggest last," I agree.

  • So I would say if you're gonna use

  • a water-based moisturizer, use that and then