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  • - Dermatologists say you don't need special eye creams.

  • Use what you use on the rest of your face, it's just skin.

  • It's never just skin.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Hey guys, my name is Dr. Michelle Henry,

  • I am a board certified dermatologist

  • practicing in Manhattan, New York,

  • and I do the full range of dermatology,

  • so everything from skin checks to acne consults

  • to skin cancer surgery to Botox and fillers,

  • so I'm excited to be here with you guys today.

  • We're gonna take a deep dive

  • into the Go To Bed With Me comment section

  • and I am gonna answer some of your most burning questions.

  • (upbeat music)

  • So I don't have one specific cleansing method

  • that I recommend for all patients.

  • What's really important is that you know your skin type.

  • Let's say you have oily skin.

  • Now what's going to be critical is that you're removing

  • the oil, the dirt and debris from the day.

  • So you're gonna want a slightly stronger cleanser,

  • so maybe a gel or a foaming cleanser.

  • If you have dry skin,

  • I recommend something like mycellar water.

  • So mycellar water is a really gentle way

  • to cleanse the skin.

  • So really choosing your cleansing method

  • depends on your skin type.

  • So first ask yourself, what is my skin type?

  • And then choose your cleanser.

  • I like that you alternate your cleansers.

  • I'm going to try that.

  • I agree with her.

  • Our skin changes, the weather changes,

  • our micro environment changes from day to day,

  • and some days I have normal to combination skin.

  • Some days I'm dry, and some days I'm oily.

  • And I really do have to change my products

  • and my cleanser on a daily or weekly basis

  • based on my skin's needs.

  • So ask your skin, how am I feeling today?

  • And if you're feeling dry,

  • it might not be the day to use a really harsh exfoliant

  • or to use a really drying cleanser

  • with really strong, active ingredients.

  • Really listen to your skin.

  • Think about your microenvironment.

  • Think about the season of the year.

  • Think about how it's feeling,

  • and choose your products based on that.

  • Does anyone else cringe

  • at her rubbing and tugging so harshly?

  • Rubbing and tugging harshly is absolutely something

  • we do not want to do.

  • Our skin is a very delicate organ,

  • and in my opinion, one of our most important organs,

  • and so we really have to treat it delicately.

  • So when we're cleansing our skin,

  • even if you're wearing really heavy makeup,

  • make sure that you remove it gently

  • and make sure that you're using

  • the appropriate cleansers and makeup removers

  • so that the process is nice and smooth and seamless.

  • But tugging will not get your makeup off any faster.

  • It will not make your skin happier or healthier.

  • It will more likely cause little microtears,

  • causing your skin to become inflamed,

  • making your skin at risk for having infection,

  • and it really is not what we're looking for.

  • Next comment by Red Candy is,

  • she has on her jewelry while doing her skincare routine.

  • Rings and watches carry a large amount of bacteria.

  • No wonder her face gets easily inflamed.

  • Also, calls moisturizer crazy, but uses lemon on her face.

  • So, two things here.

  • Rings and watches, especially rings,

  • which are typically metal,

  • aren't really what we call fomite,

  • so they're not holding a lot of bacteria typically.

  • Of course, could they? Yes.

  • But typically one does not have to remove

  • a nice, smooth ring to tend to their skin.

  • Now if you're wearing a ring that's quite jagged,

  • I'm more concerned about it tearing the skin

  • than I am about it causing a bacterial infection.

  • The likelihood that she's getting bacteria from her ring

  • is teeny teeny tiny, so that's not a concern.

  • What I'm more concerned about is the lemon.

  • Using lemon on the face, lemon can be really drying.

  • It can actually be quite caustic to the skin.

  • Further, citrus fruits can cause something we call

  • phytophotodermatitis, and so they can sensitize the skin,

  • causing inflammation, and actually causing

  • a really, really dark hyperpigmentation.

  • So I really don't want her using that lemon

  • and then going out into the sun tomorrow.

  • That's more problematic to me than wearing her rings.

  • Exfoliators shouldn't be used as a second cleanse.

  • It should really be a cleansing oil to break up makeup,

  • followed by a gentle water-based cleanser

  • like a gel cleanser to remove remaining dirt and whatnot.

  • But whatever works for her, I guess.

  • She's gorgeous.

  • I don't agree with this.

  • It depends on the exfoliator.

  • So if you're wearing really heavy makeup,

  • an exfoliator is not going to be able to exfoliate the skin.

  • And why are we using exfoliators?

  • We want them to remove the dead skin.

  • Of course to remove dirt, oil, and debris,

  • but they're usually more effective at removing dead.

  • We want to first remove that barrier.

  • So if you're using a makeup that's heavy,

  • I'd prefer that you use an oil cleanser

  • or whatever cleanser you're using to remove your makeup,

  • and then use the appropriate exfoliant afterwards.

  • If you're starting out a new exfoliation regimen,

  • I always recommend no more than once or twice a week,

  • and gradually work your way up.

  • It also depends on if you're using physical

  • or chemical exfoliation.

  • So physical exfoliation or manual exfoliation,

  • which is using something like a spin brush

  • or using something that has beads in it

  • or even sugar granules,

  • something that's manually exfoliating,

  • is oftentimes a little bit harsher

  • than using a chemical exfoliant.

  • Whatever you do, it's based on your skin type,

  • start out one to two times a week,

  • and gradually work your way up based on your tolerance.

  • Foam cleanser can't remove makeup completely

  • and they all feel light on the skin.

  • It's foam.

  • I don't necessarily agree with this either.

  • So it depends on the type of makeup.

  • So if you're wearing your daily makeup,

  • a really robust foam cleanser,

  • especially foam cleanser that has ingredients like

  • glycolic acid or salicylic acid,

  • which are really great at exfoliating

  • and breaking down dirt, oil, and debris,

  • can remove makeup from the skin.

  • If it's for daily makeup, a foam cleanser,

  • the appropriate foam cleanser can work

  • and can give you an efficient cleanse.

  • (upbeat music)

  • A serum is typically in the treatment phase

  • of your skincare regimen.

  • It's a lightweight product that's pact

  • with active ingredients.

  • So you choose your serum based on your skin concern.

  • So whether that is brightening, fine lines,

  • or dark spots, a serum will help target

  • that specific concern.

  • A serum and essence, they may sound similar

  • but they are quite different.

  • A serum typically has a higher concentration

  • of active ingredients

  • and it's a little bit heavier,

  • whereas an essence has active ingredients

  • but it's a little bit lighter

  • and it's a little bit more hydrating.

  • So let's say you're someone who has more sensitive skin,

  • you might want to start with an essence first.

  • If you're someone who has a little bit more robust skin,

  • you're less sensitive,

  • then the serum might be the answer for you.

  • So the next comment is by Melissa MJ,

  • and she says, she's doing oils first, then serums, no.

  • Melissa, you're right.

  • So, an oil is typically occlusive.

  • And so that means that it doesn't allow things to penetrate,

  • it doesn't allow water to come out,

  • nor does it let water or other ingredients

  • to cross it to get in.

  • And so if you're using an oil first on your skin

  • and applying your serum next, you're wasting your serum,

  • it's not able to penetrate.

  • I'm genuinely interested to see how well

  • the next generation will age.

  • Given what we know about retinol

  • and other skincare ingredients,

  • will there be lots of 50-something-year-old people

  • walking around with baby soft, unlined skin?

  • I certainly hope so.

  • I have been using retinol for as long as I can remember.

  • I actually use it twice a day,

  • which is a little bit naughty,

  • but I absolutely love it.

  • And in seeing my patients and practicing for many years,

  • it is changing skincare.

  • We look at a lot of celebrities that we love

  • and we wonder why they look so fantastic,

  • and I think a big part of it is excellent skincare,

  • which using a retinol is absolutely the gold standard

  • and should be a part of that.

  • The next comment is by Maddy O'Toole.

  • You only need two to three drops of serum.

  • Well Maddy, this is not correct.

  • Everyone's different.

  • Some faces are more generous than other faces.

  • Some serums are a little bit thicker

  • or a little bit thinner,

  • and so you know, there is no strict rule

  • that you need two to three drops.

  • Frankly, I need more than two to three drops.

  • It just depends on the nature of the serum and your skin.

  • What we're looking for is that you're making

  • a thin, even layer.

  • When you're putting on serum, it's not drippy.

  • It's just a thin, even layer.

  • You should allow your skin to absorb it,

  • and that can be anywhere from two to six drops, who knows.

  • How do you know if you're using too much of a product?

  • Your skin will tell you.

  • If you're irritated,

  • if you feel that your other products aren't working

  • because you now have 14 products

  • and your moisturizer can't get in.

  • So listen to your skin.

  • If you're using too many active ingredients,

  • one of the top things I see in my office

  • is that when patients have a skin concern,

  • they turn into little mad scientists

  • and they're using everything

  • and they're trying to improve their skin,

  • and they often get irritation.

  • So I think irritation is one of the top key indicators

  • that you're using too many products.

  • So the next comment is, you can see

  • that the vitamin C serum has gone bad.

  • That's why she's got a yellow tint.

  • Well, this is incorrect.

  • Vitamin C serum typically has a yellow

  • kind of golden hue, so you really can't tell

  • that it's gone bad by looking at it.

  • If it smells bad, then maybe you could tell,

  • but by looking at it, it's really difficult to tell.

  • When you're buying a vitamin C serum,

  • what's key is that the bottle should really be opaque,

  • because vitamin C can be quite unstable.

  • And so we take lots of precautions

  • and lots of steps to stabilize,

  • and because it's sensitive to light,

  • we typically put it in an opaque bottle.

  • The average shelf life, you know, it's hard

  • because different products have different ingredients.

  • Some of them have more water.