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  • In this American English lesson,

  • we're going to sit down with my dad and talk about where he works now that he's mostly retired.

  • You'll learn the phrasal verb 'boot out',

  • how to use space and room, a shortcut to make the word 'months' easier to pronounce, and much more.

  • We're going to listen to the first 15 seconds or so of this conversation.

  • Then we'll study some of the wordshow they're being used and how they're pronounced.

  • Pay attention to booted out, space, and often from home.

  • Are you still going into work at all these days?

  • No. Actually, I finally got booted out in my second office.

  • Really?

  • Yeah.

  • I didn't know that.

  • Well they, they're...they have all kinds of issues with space.

  • Yeah.

  • And since I'm only working one month a year...

  • Yeah.

  • And that often from home.

  • Right.

  • Did you hear my dad use the phrasal verb booted out?

  • Finally got booted out in my second office.

  • Really?

  • Booted out.

  • This is just like kicked out.

  • It means to be asked or forced to leave a place, job or situation.

  • My dad, though he was mostly retired, still had an office at the University where he worked.

  • But after many years, they needed the office for someone else and booted him out of it.

  • Finally got booted out in my second office.

  • Really?

  • Notice my dad isn't pronouncing the T in 'booted' as a true T.

  • That would sound like: booted, booted.

  • But instead, it's: booted.

  • That's a flap T.

  • The tongue bounces once against the roof of the mouth

  • and the teeth don't need to come together the way they do for a true T.

  • Booted. Booted.

  • This is how we pronounce the T when it comes between two vowels

  • but doesn't start a stressed syllable in American English.

  • Finally got booted out in my second office.

  • Really?

  • Yeah.

  • I didn't know that.

  • Well they, they're...they have all kinds of issues with space.

  • The way my dad is using 'space' is interchangeable with the word room.

  • These are nouns that mean an area that's available or unoccupied.

  • The university doesn't have enough space.

  • It doesn't have enough room for my dad to have an office anymore.

  • Of course these words have other meanings as a noun.

  • What you might think of as outer space, or a room with four walls like a living room, dining room, etc.

  • But let's come up with a few more sample sentences where we're using the words to mean 'available'.

  • The garage is used for storage, there's no room to park.

  • Or the garage is used for storage there's space to park.

  • Sometimes, when I'm reading at night to my son Stoney, he sits really close to me.

  • So close that he's sitting on my arm, and I can't turn the page.

  • I might say: Can you scoot over, Stoney?

  • I need a little more room.

  • Or I could say: I need a little more space.

  • They have all kinds of issues with space.

  • Yeah.

  • And since I'm only working one month a year...

  • Yeah.

  • And that often from home.

  • Right.

  • You may also use these nouns as adjectives.

  • Then they become spacious and roomy.

  • Our minivan is much more spacious than our Volkswagen.

  • Or our minivan is much more roomy than our Volkswagen.

  • They have all kinds of issues with space.

  • Yeah.

  • And since I'm only working one month a year...

  • Yeah.

  • And that often from home.

  • Right.

  • 'Work from home' is the phrase be used for working remotely at your computer in your home office.

  • From is the preposition we usually use, though you may use at as well.

  • I work at home one day a week.

  • Not 'in' but 'from' or 'at'.

  • And since I'm only working one month a year...

  • Yeah.

  • And that often from home.

  • Right.

  • And that often from home.

  • Listen to how my dad pronounces 'from'.

  • Its reduced.

  • It's not from, longer with the full UH as in butter vowel, but it's reduced to the schwa and said really quickly.

  • Often from home.

  • Often from, from, from.

  • Practice that with my dad.

  • And since I'm only working one month a year...

  • Yeah.

  • And that often from home.

  • Right.

  • Do you notice how he's pronouncing often?

  • Without the T sound.

  • This word can be pronounced either way.

  • Often or often.

  • But it's a bit more common to drop the T and that's what I encourage you to do.

  • That often from home.

  • Often.

  • Often.

  • And since I'm only working one month a year...

  • Yeah.

  • And that often from home.

  • Right.

  • Now we'll listen to another thirty Seconds.

  • Pay attention to stuff, how I say okay, the pronunciation of months, and the word 'bummed'.

  • I now have my stuff stored in one bookshelf and two file cabinets.

  • Why have it there at all?

  • Well, these, I have a lot of things at home but these are things that I just wouldn't use very often.

  • >> So if I need them, I'll go down. >> Okay.

  • So how long ago did that happen?

  • Oh, two months ago.

  • Are you bummed?

  • I was a little bummed about that.

  • Stuff.

  • This is a generic term we often use to mean possessions.

  • I have too much stuff.

  • I need a second suitcase.

  • Or as my dad said, I now have my stuff stored in one bookshelf and two file cabinets.

  • I now have my stuff stored in one bookshelf and two file cabinets.

  • However, it can also refer to things that are not tangible, not objects.

  • For example, I have a lot of stuff to deal with at work.

  • This could be an employee who's not cooperating, a client who's unhappy.

  • What I'm dealing with is the difficulty, not an actual thing, not an object.

  • You could also say: I have a lot of stuff to do.

  • That means I'm busy.

  • You may also hear the phrase: He really knows his stuff.

  • That means he's very smart and informed, relating to a specific topic.

  • We also use this as a verb.

  • Meaning to try to make something fit with force.

  • There's no room in my bag for shoes.

  • Can't you stuff them in?

  • Did you notice how I use the word 'room' there?

  • I could have also used 'space'.

  • There's no space in my bag for shoes.

  • Can't you stuff them in?

  • I now have my stuff stored in one bookshelf and two file cabinets.

  • Why have it there at all?

  • Well, these, I have a lot of things at home, but these are things that I just wouldn't use very often.

  • >> So if I need them, I'll go down. >> Okay.

  • There, I said: kay, then: mmkay.

  • These are both variants of 'okay'.

  • I say this to show that I understand what he's talking about.

  • I understand his reasoning.

  • You'll hear both of these variants a lot.

  • They're both really common.

  • Kay. Mmmkay.

  • >> I just wouldn't use very often. >> Kay.

  • >> So if I need them, I'll go down. >> Mmkay.

  • So how long ago did that happen?

  • Oh, two months ago.

  • Two months ago.

  • The word 'months' can be really tricky because we have a TH sound followed by S

  • and I know my students just hate this combination.

  • But there's good news here.

  • There's actually a shortcut that most native speakers do.

  • Did you hear my dad's pronunciation?

  • Let's listen again.

  • Oh, two months ago.

  • He said: months, with a TS ending rather than THS.

  • I do this too.

  • It's really common and I definitely recommend my students use this pronunciation.

  • Tss. Tss

  • Months.

  • Months.

  • Try that now.

  • Months.

  • Two months ago.

  • Two months ago.

  • Two months ago.

  • Oh, two months ago.

  • Are you bummed?

  • I was a little bummed about that.

  • 'Bummed' this is informal, slang, but it means to be disappointed.

  • We might also use the phrasal verb: bummed out.

  • It has the same meaning.

  • Are you bummed?

  • I was a little bummed about that.

  • Now we're going to listen to the last fifty seconds of this conversation.

  • At the end, I'm going to ask you a question to test your listening comprehension.

  • Since he doesn't have an office, my dad will use the library, use a conference room,

  • use someone else's office, or none of the above?

  • Listen one more time to choose your answer.

  • What is the answer?

  • We did hear mention of the library, or a conference room.

  • Would you like go in and work at the library? Or is there like a conference room?

  • >> No. >> No.

  • >> Not really.

  • But he said no, he would not use those.

  • Notice how my dad says the phrase 'not really'.

  • This is a common phrase and sometimes, with common phrases, we reduce certain words

  • even more than we normally would.

  • He dropped the T so the AW vowel connects right into the R.

  • Not really.

  • Not really.

  • Not is stressed even without the T.

  • This would be a common way to pronounce this two-word phrase.

  • Try it with me.

  • Not really.

  • Not really.

  • >> No. >> No.

  • Not really.

  • >> No. >> No.

  • Not really.

  • >> No. >> No.

  • Not really.

  • So the first two options are out.

  • What about the third option?

  • We did talk about someone else's office.

  • This guy offered for dad to use his office sometimes.

  • I can use another guy's office.

  • Okay, is he also not there that much?

  • No, he is there but he said he would leave during that time.

  • Why would he do that? Who is it?

  • Well, he's a new guy and his wife also works there and she's not there that much.

  • So he would go over to her office.

  • Okay.

  • I would go into his office where I have my stuff stored.

  • But when I asked if he would do that, dad said: no.

  • >> Do you think you'll ever do that? >> No.

  • Yeah 'cause that feels awkward.

  • So the correct answer is D.

  • None of the above.

  • My dad will just work from home.

  • >> Do you think you'll ever do that? >> No.

  • Yeah 'cause that feels awkward.

  • I will just work from home.

  • Notice he used that phrase again.

  • Work from home.

  • With the reduction of the word 'from'.

  • Work from, from, work from home.

  • >> I will just work from home. >> Yeah.

  • Let's listen to the whole conversation one more time and listen again to the words and phrases we studied.

  • Are you still going into work at all these days?

  • No. Actually, I finally got booted out in my second office.

  • Really?

  • Yeah.

  • I didn't know that.

  • Well they, they're...they have all kinds of issues with space.

  • Yeah.

  • And since I'm only working one month a year...

  • Yeah.

  • And that often from home.

  • Right.

  • I now have my stuff stored in one bookshelf and two file cabinets.

  • Why have it there at all?

  • Well, these, I have a lot of things at home but these are things that I just wouldn't use very often.

  • Okay.

  • >> So if I need them, I'll go down. >> Okay.

  • So how long ago did that happen?