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  • Hi, I'm Carl Azuz, reporting from a remote location this week because our normal bookshelf spot was all booked up.

  • And to start things off on CNN 10, we're heading out west, where large wildfires have been reported in 12 states.

  • From Alaska to California to New Mexico to Montana and every state in between more than 4.5 million acres have burned, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

  • It says that more than 30,000 firefighters and supporting workers have been deployed to the West to fight.

  • The blaze is at least 33 people have died in the region, and officials say dozens more are missing.

  • California seems to be the hardest hit state at this point.

  • It's the site of 24 wildfires, but 12 or more have been reported in each state of Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

  • These satellite images show you how the cities of Talent and Phoenix, Oregon have been devastated.

  • Longtime viewer Michael Torgersen tells us that thousands have been evacuated in southern Oregon.

  • Half a million people statewide have been told they may have to evacuate.

  • Like California, Oregon is no stranger to wildfires.

  • The state's governor says they typically destroy half a million acres per year.

  • But she adds that more than a million acres were lost in this past week alone, and neighboring Washington is struggling with its second worst wildfires in state history, according to its governor.

  • Miles away from the fires themselves, there are problems in the air.

  • Major League Baseball and the National Football League were monitoring air quality yesterday in advance of games played out west.

  • Clean air centers have been opened in parts of California to give relief to people who have nowhere else to go.

  • The problem could be seen as well as felt.

  • [Massive plumes of smoke blanketed the San Francisco Bay Area, turning the sky orange.]

  • It's like the apocalypse right now, haha, it's like nighttime in the daytime.

  • [Wildfires, raging across the West Coast generated the smoke and caused ash to rain down.]

  • They're saying it's coming all the way from Oregon, which is hundreds of miles away.

  • [Residents turned on lights, looking into a rust-colored sky that made it look like nighttime.]

  • 11:15 in the morning, and it's like the middle of the night almost, so ...

  • [Other places, such as Salem, Oregon experienced similar apocalyptic glows.]

  • [Dozens of wildfires have been ravaging the West Coast, scorching millions of acres.]

  • [They've led to the longest stretch of unhealthy air quality alerts on record in the Bay Area.]

  • 10-second trivia!

  • Which of these insects has the shortest lifespan?

  • Firefly, honeybee, termite or cicada?

  • Of these options, the worker honeybee has the shortest lifespan at around 40 days.

  • But what an important 40 days that is.

  • The US Department of Agriculture has credited pollinators, including bees, for playing a role in about a third of our food supply.

  • For decades, bee colonies have been decreasing in America, though they've been growing elsewhere.

  • From the middle of the last century until now, US bee colonies have declined from about six million to less than three million.

  • But worldwide colonies have increased from less than 50 million to more than 90 million.

  • And those include the one in Ireland were about to visit, which is using modern technology to help an ancient practice.

  • It's a centuries old tradition, and not for the faint-hearted.

  • They're getting a little excited now, they don't want anyone to touch their honey.

  • Regular hive inspections are necessary to see if it's healthy, that the queen is alive, allowing the colony to grow.

  • With up to 50,000 bees in each box, examinations can take several hours and can be labor intensive.

  • There's such a magnificent creature.

  • Collectively, these little creatures are so important to the survival of our planet, to economies.

  • I just think that we ... we should be protecting them.

  • See, the honeybee is not a mere honey producer.

  • One third of all the world's food crop production, like almonds and avocados, depend on pollinators.

  • Pollination from insects, mainly bees, contribute up to US$181 billion worth to the agri-food industry annually.

  • But whole colonies are being ravaged by diseases, and the use of pesticides and fungicides in farming.

  • Last year in the United States, beekeepers lost 43 percent of their colonies.

  • The good news, though, is that smart bee technology could be coming to the rescue.

  • High up in the Wicklow Mountains, about an hour south of Dublin in Ireland, Simon Lynch has been part of a testing ground for a new, emerging smart bee technology over the last two years.

  • And there is our queen.

  • A small Internet-connected sensor has been placed under the roof of the hive, where it measures temperature, humidity, sound and movement.

  • We've got beehives here in Ireland, in the U.K., in South Africa, over in the USA.

  • And what we've been doing for the last two years, is collecting data from these beehives--building a giant beehive database.

  • Irish startup ApisProtect claims that sensors can help produce losses on improve the health of honeybees worldwide by alerting beekeepers immediately if there's a problem in the hive.

  • The technology allows beekeepers like Simon to remotely monitor their hives, so that they can more quickly on more easily check whether there is a problem.

  • It's hoped that this technology will allow commercial beekeepers to upscale their business.

  • Ensuring more pollination and more food for a growing global population.

  • See, pollination is one of the most important biological processes on our planet.

  • When bees go out to forage, they collect nectar and pollen to bring back to their colony.

  • As it lands on a flower, a bee gets covered in pollen, a dust-like substance produced by the flower that contains the male reproductive materials.

  • As the bee moves from flower to flower, the pollen falls off, hopefully dusting the female reproductive structure.

  • That fertilizes the plants reproductive organs, kick starting the production of seeds and new plants.

  • Beekeeping, maybe an historic tradition, but smart technology hopes to ensure it has a fruitful future.

  • From bees to dogs, we're moving up the food chain today.

  • There are records of canines having been used in warfare for thousands of years, and these four-legged helpers recently participated in a military exercise in Nevada.

  • Technically, they're known as autonomous unmanned ground vehicles--UGVs.

  • But we like to call them robot dogs.

  • They're equipped with a number of sensors and radios, and their mission in this exercise was to scout for threats outside a cargo plane before the human troops came out and were exposed to danger.

  • So they're not attack vehicles, their information-gathering ones.

  • We don't know the cost.

  • But the electronics network Engadget reported that the company that makes these robot dogs was trying to develop a similar quadruped at a price point of US$1,500.

  • If you've ever wondered how fast do emperor penguins walk?

  • The answer is not very, but they can keep up with people.

  • At least this one did while following a group of expeditioners in Antarctica.

  • Try to catch up, buddy.

  • Hey ... yeah ...

  • The researcher who recorded this video told Storyful that every time he talked to the penguin the animal responded.

  • Try to keep up, buddy.

  • Okay, so that's how they went.

  • Having a nice conversation as the penguins slid along on its belly.

  • The Australian Antarctic program says sometimes emperor penguins just wanna tag along.

  • Well, why not?

  • He's king.

  • He's having a royally good time.

  • And if the ice sheet is like a red carpet, he should totally peng-win the title for best supporting Arct-or.

  • Okay, we know penguins aren't technically ox, but we could still talk like it for the sake of a really good pun-guin.

  • I'm Carl Azuz, Tok, Alaska is where we wrap up today's show.

  • Shout out to the students of Tok School.

  • That's all for today's edition of CNN (10).

Hi, I'm Carl Azuz, reporting from a remote location this week because our normal bookshelf spot was all booked up.

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B2 H-INT bee oregon technology honeybee pollination flower

Mars On Earth, Robot Dogs, and Bees | September 14, 2020

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    林宜悉   posted on 2020/10/12
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