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  • - Hey guys, welcome to Travel Feels.

  • My name is Matti.

  • Today we're gonna talk about teal and orange.

  • Is it good?

  • Is it bad?

  • Is it just a trend?

  • Should you be doing it?

  • Let's find out.

  • Let's get into it.

  • (electronic music)

  • So, in filmmaking, there's ton of trends that come and go.

  • For example, the trendy zoom transitions,

  • and those different transitions

  • that we talked about in previous videos.

  • Some people would say that

  • the teal and orange look or color grade

  • is just a trendy thing that's going on right now,

  • but I'm gonna tell you why

  • the teal and orange look is here to stay.

  • When I first started color grading and making films,

  • I'd try all sorts of wacky things.

  • I'd be like, "Oh, this looks really cool"

  • and I'd put purple in the shadows,

  • or I'd be like, "Oh, this is really good,

  • "I'm gonna put red in the shadows",

  • and then I realized there's a really good reason

  • why the teal and orange look

  • is so popular and so widespread,

  • and it actually has to do with the science of color.

  • And before we get into it, I just wanna remind you guys

  • that the Cine LUTs Pack, these are presets for your videos,

  • are on sale right now for only $10

  • and also all of my courses are on sale for $20,

  • even the color grading course.

  • $20 right now for the next couple weeks,

  • so go and check those out.

  • So, in every film there's one constant with colors,

  • and that's skin tones.

  • No matter what your complexion is,

  • all the skin tones lie in a really small

  • section of the color wheel.

  • We're all in the same color space

  • when it comes to skin complexion.

  • And some skins are darker and some skins are lighter,

  • but we're all in the orange section of the color wheel.

  • You can see here, I took a whole bunch

  • of different skins complexions and

  • put them into Adobe Color,

  • and if you haven't used Adobe Color before,

  • this is a really handy tool.

  • You can take a screengrab from any video or any movie

  • and you'll be able to find out exactly

  • what colors are being used in that movie.

  • What colors are in the shadows, in the highlights,

  • what's going on with respect to the color grade.

  • It's really handy.

  • So, we upload this picture of different skin complexions

  • and look how similar they all are.

  • They all fit in this one little sliver of the color wheel.

  • It's really interesting to me.

  • So, all the skin tones are in the same area,

  • no matter what the complexion of your talent is.

  • Now, in filmmaking or color grading,

  • you can use light and shadow to create contrast

  • or using luminence to create contrast,

  • but you can also use color,

  • and the way we create color contrast

  • is by using complementary colors,

  • which is basically just opposite colors.

  • Not only do they fit well together,

  • but they also make each other pop.

  • So, for example, if you have this green background

  • and you have a red dot in the middle,

  • it's gonna really pop out of the middle,

  • whereas if you make that same circle yellow,

  • it doesn't pop as much as it does when it's red.

  • Okay, so where are we going with this?

  • Well, if you go into Adobe Color

  • and you choose 'Complementary'

  • for those skin complexions that we put in,

  • Look where the complementary color is.

  • It's teal,

  • and this is where teal and orange comes from.

  • It's not actually just a trendy thing,

  • it's actually the science of color

  • and our skin complexion.

  • The teal and orange look actually really

  • enhances the storytelling,

  • because it really focuses the viewer's attention

  • to the characters because of that color contrast.

  • Usually you end up putting teal

  • in the shadows and maybe the highlights,

  • and in the midtones where the skin tones lie,

  • you push a little bit of orange.

  • So your background ends up being more blue,

  • and your subject ends up being orange,

  • and this means color contrast.

  • Your subjects are gonna pop out of the image

  • more than anything else.

  • You're always gonna be drawn to those faces

  • because of that color contrast,

  • and that's why it enhances the story,

  • and that's why the teal and orange look is so popular.

  • It's actually not a trend, it's science.

  • And we humans are super-critical of skin tones.

  • If the skin tones are a little bit too green,

  • right away, we think, "Oh, this guy's sick"

  • or "Something's wrong with this person",

  • or if we go to magenta, then we're thinking

  • "This person's an alien or something.

  • "This does not look natural at all."

  • There is a little bit of wiggle room.

  • You can move around the skin tones a little bit,

  • but you can't go too far,

  • or else it's gonna look really unnatural.

  • So, that's why you're really limited

  • to this teal and orange look.

  • You could go a little bit more yellow-blue,

  • or you could go a little bit more green-red,

  • but it's always gonna be in this

  • same section of the color wheel,

  • and that's because of our skin complexion.

  • It always stays the same.

  • The only trendy part of this is

  • how you use this information.

  • For example, you could go to the extreme Transformer look,

  • that really saturated teal and orange,

  • or you could do a much more subtle version

  • like in The Revenant.

  • It's still there, but it's much more subtle

  • and you won't right away notice that

  • "Oh, this is teal and orange",

  • but the science behind the teal and orange look

  • will always be the same.

  • So, quickly, without any LUTs or anything like that,

  • just using some color wheels,

  • this is how you would pull off the teal and orange look.

  • First off, you would want to get your contrast levels right,

  • and then you would add teal to the shadows.

  • Then, next, you would go to the midtones

  • and drag it to the opposite orange area,

  • and then you would take the highlights

  • towards the teal area,

  • or if you want a more warm look,

  • you could also take it towards the orange area.

  • I would usually bring it more towards the teal,

  • just to cancel out some of that

  • correction in the midtones.

  • And then notice once you change the highlights,

  • the midtones change a little bit

  • so you have to kind of

  • go back and forth and finesse the look,

  • so that it looks pleasing to the eye

  • and you're happy with it.

  • And the further away from the middle

  • you drag the color wheels,

  • the more intense the look is gonna be.

  • For me, I usually like a much more subtle look.

  • Just a little bit of teal and orange.

  • That works best for me.

  • Everyone has a different style

  • and look that they're going for,

  • so you can go more extreme or go more muted.

  • There's no right or wrong answer there,

  • but one thing remains the same

  • and that's the color of our skin.

  • We're all on the same sliver of the color wheel,

  • so that's never gonna change

  • and that's why the teal and orange works and is so popular.

  • There's a reason why every single Hollywood film

  • pretty much uses this kind of color palette

  • in some way, shape or form.

  • So, next time you're color grading your film,

  • stick to the science, stick to what works,

  • and use that color grading to enhance your storytelling

  • instead of distracting the audience

  • with weird colors that just don't work.

  • If you enjoyed this video,

  • hit that 'Like' button, subscribe to the channel,

  • and go check out the Cine LUTs Pack

  • and some of the teaching courses

  • like the color grading course that I have.

  • They're all on sale.

  • Guys, enjoy the filmmaking process,

  • and go get some of those Travel Feels.

  • (electronic music)

- Hey guys, welcome to Travel Feels.

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B1 US teal orange skin grading contrast wheel

WHY Color Grade TEAL And ORANGE?!?!

  • 7 1
    吴晓洪 posted on 2020/09/09
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