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  • For days on end you've been walking, carrying a rucksack on your back that is pretty much

  • the weight of a small human being. You've hiked up hills, climbed up cliffs, traversed

  • rivers, and throughout this certain kind of hell, you've hardly slept at all. But you

  • know whatyou're ok with it. You'll surviveand that's because you've been

  • through one of the training regimes we'll talk about today.

  • Navy SEALS Ok, so you wanna be a Navy SEAL. You can see

  • yourself running for miles on end singing, “I don't know but I've been told. A frog

  • man's money is good as gold.” We won't spend too much time on the basic

  • stuff, because we think many of you could get through the beginning of the training.

  • That's what they call theNavy SEAL Physical Screening Test.”

  • Can you run a mile and a half in less than 9.30 minutes? Sure you can.

  • Can you do 75 sit ups and 75 push upsno sweat.

  • But that's just the beginning. You've proved nothing at all.

  • Next you have Boot Camp, and if you get through that, you will begin what's called, “Basic

  • Underwater Demolition.” Guys in the military just call this BUDS.

  • It's phase one of BUDS that seems to be the hardest, and that's where most people

  • drop out. In fact, from what we can see, on average only 33 percent of trainees get through

  • phase one. If you can make it through this phase it's very likely you'll become a

  • SEAL. Phase one is basically weeding out the weakest,

  • and we should also say that through this seven-week phase some people just get injured. Think

  • about itit makes senseif you're not physically and mentally tough, there's really

  • no point in taking you to the next level. That's why the first phase is all about

  • physical and mental conditioning, and it includes something called, “Hell Week”, which doesn't

  • sound like a very nice week at all. These are just some of things you'll have

  • to do in the first few weeks of phase one training.

  • A 1,000-yard swimwith your fins on, in less than twenty minutes.

  • Be able to do at least 70 pushups in less than two minutes.

  • Be able to do at least 10 pullups in less than two minutes, and you must be capable

  • of running four miles, fully clothed, in less than 31 minutes.

  • You'll be doing stuff like this all the time, and doing other activities that include

  • beach runs and swimming in the ocean. Then there's also the BUD/S obstacle course you'll

  • have to complete time and again, which might remind you of the countless movies made about

  • military training schools. Hell Week itself is five days and five nights

  • of almost constant training and recruits will only be allowed to sleep a few hours during

  • this entire period. It's hell for sure, and a lot of guys drop

  • out during Hell Week. Recruits will be running, swimming in the ocean, building and carrying

  • boats, crawling through mud, being screamed at the entire time, and they will be constantly

  • cold and wet. It's hard to train for, because when we

  • looked at websites where SEALS talked about Hell Week it seems there are different kinds

  • of hell. One exercise might simply be carrying a 300-pound (136-kg) log with another guy

  • to help you. This is how one guy put it, “Too cold, too

  • much stress, too many pushups, too much running, too much water skills - pretty much BUD/S

  • will give you TOO MUCH of everything.” He said half of the recruits he was with dropped

  • out by the end of Hell Week. He said each day was continuous running, crawling, swimming,

  • carrying around heavy things. They got to eat, but then it was back to the exercises.

  • He said the nights and days merged. He could barely think. He just did what he was told

  • to do and the whistle became his master. The food was hot, which was good, because he said

  • most men spent the entire time shivering because they were so cold and so wet.

  • After three days of this, he said the remaining men go intozombie mode”, running down

  • beaches with a boat above their heads. His exact words were, Hell Week will turn you

  • into a caveman, but once it's over, you've definitely earned your right to become Navy

  • SEAL. SAS

  • Is SAS training hardWell, if you do a bit of research you'll find it's so hard that

  • men have recently died doing it. It was in fact, too hard. Some guys in the SAS actually

  • ended up in court after three trainees died during one of the challenges.

  • What challenge was that, you might ask. Well, it was a fairly simple exercise. Recruits

  • were just given very heavy backpacks and told to march up and down hills in the blistering

  • heat without resting too much. How hard could that be, you're thinking.

  • Well, one guy died from heatstroke and two other guys died from multiple organ failure.

  • It was very hard...as hard as you can get. That's hardly debatable seeing as three

  • men died. We found a guy that had actually passedthe

  • hillsstage of training and he said that essentially men spend four weeks in rural

  • Wales running up hills carrying their weapons and a backpack weighing 70 pounds (31kg).

  • His exact words were, “My course started with 350 guys and finished with 13.”

  • That's a bigger dropout rate than the Navy SEALS, and the man that said this said all

  • of the guys doing the training were already pretty fit since they'd already passed the

  • first phase of selection. This is called the Special Forces Brieng Course.

  • This first phase is not only about fitness, but it's also about map reading, IQ testing,

  • military knowledge and first aid. But you will have to show that you can swim 100 meters

  • fully clothed in under 3 minutes, and you'll also have to do a 2-mile run in under 18 minutes.

  • 350 guys could do that, and we expect some of you could do it, too. But could you run

  • up hills for a week? The answer is likely no, since 13 soldiers only made it past that

  • week in one of the programs. Ok, down to 13 menIs it now over?... No

  • is the answer, not even close. The guy we just talked about said his small

  • team of recruits were then flown to the jungles of Brunei and they spent six weeks living

  • among ants, mosquitoes, flies, centipedes, snakes, spiders, you name it. He said everything

  • was trying to eat him in that jungle. The trainers are watching all the time, seeing

  • how good the men's survival skills are. Those trainers lay traps for the men, and

  • some men almost lose their minds in the dense jungle.

  • When that's done, they want to break you mentally. This will be your hostage scenario

  • training and it's basically torture. It's full name isSurvive, Evade, Resist, Extract

  • training.” You'll be grabbed hold of, roughed up, held in very painful positions,

  • and you'll be interrogated. If you can hold on for 36 hours without getting

  • too distressed or giving any information away, you've passed.

  • Spetsnaz Spetsnaz is basically a term that is used

  • for all Russian special military units, and the training is special, too.

  • It's hard to find the specifics, but every soldier will of course have to go through

  • a basic orientation course. The training after that, the physical side

  • anyway, is all about endurance and strength Spetsnazovtsi are expected to be stronger

  • and fitter than other Russian soldiers, and if they can't prove that, they're out.

  • They are expected to rappel from buildings and cliffs, jump out of aircraft, and like

  • the SAS, they'll do special mountain training, but they'll do it during the freezing winter

  • months. They'll be dropped off in some mountainous terrain, given a survival pack, and then expected

  • to get out within two weeks. Another big aspect of this training is basically

  • having a fight. Spetsnazovtsi are well known to be good at

  • one-on-one combat, and a big part of the training will involve learning how to strike, how to

  • wrestle, and how to snap a man's bones when he's down on the floor. Training for a Spetsnaz

  • unit is a bit like training for an MMA fight. The actual martial art they will use is called

  • Sambo, which was developed during the period of the Soviet Union. It's kind of a mix

  • of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, judo, boxing, but it also allows head butts, groin strikes,

  • and elbow strikes. Is it a good martial art? Well, why not ask

  • Khabib Nurmagomedov that question. If you don't know that name, he's one of the

  • best MMA fighters that ever walked the Earth. He started out in his fighting career doing

  • Sambo. Sometimes the fight won't be fair, though,

  • because another part of the training is learning how to fight someone who is holding a knife

  • or a metal bar. The recruits are asked to disable that guy and take away his weapon

  • while not getting hit. Could it get any worse? Well, if you believe

  • the British tabloid mediasomething which you should do at your own risksome recruits

  • were asked to fight huge, mean, maddened dogs during their training.

  • They won't even get to that point if they can't run 100 meters in less than 13 seconds,

  • which is actually very hard for most people. They'll also have to show that they can

  • run 1.9 miles (3km) in less than 12 minutes, which is also pretty damn hard.

  • Then there are the stories of recruits being held at the shoulders and legs by two other

  • men. A cinder block is placed on the man's chest, and that block is covered with gasoline

  • and set on fire. Another man subsequently breaks the block in two with a huge sledgehammer.

  • If you don't believe that, search for the photos. Don't ask us why they do this, though.

  • Does the harshness of the training make them better soldiers? Well, that's not for us

  • to say. The British tabloids say the SAS doesn't think much of the spetsnaz units, but the

  • British tabloids would say that. One guy writing about spetsnaz soldiers wrote

  • on a forum, “If American soldiers had to pass that training,they would most likely

  • quit before finishing. The Spetsnaz is the closest you can get to a superior humanoid

  • battle droid.” You can discuss that topic later in the comments,

  • but first let's have a look at Sayeret Matkal. Sayeret Matkal

  • This is part of Israel's special forces units, one of the Reconnaissance units along

  • with Shayetet 13 and Unit 5101. The former is much like the British SAS, and

  • is actually based on the SAS when it comes not just to how it operates but also how its

  • recruits train. Obviously Sayeret Matkal guys are not dying

  • on hills in Wales, so what do they have to endure during their training?

  • Well, when this unit started it was actually quite a secret operation and sounded like

  • something from a Hollywood movie. That's because only the best soldiers would be picked

  • to join and they had to keep it secret. They'd get a tap on the shoulder one day and be told

  • they'd be taking part in a serious covert operation.

  • These days it's not the same, and now any soldier can volunteer to take part in the

  • training programs that happen twice a year. Like the other units we have talked about

  • today, many people don't make it through that training.

  • The selection camp is calledGibbushand soldiers are put through hell for days

  • on end and like the SEALS Hell Week, they won't get much sleep. It's so bad that

  • doctors and psychologists need to monitor the trainees all the time.

  • Ok, so once they get through that they will have 20 months of training. This will include

  • lots of reconnaissance training, so that means these guys will be dropping into dense jungles

  • and swimming through murky swamps. It's all about learning how to handle yourself

  • behind enemy lines. It's about the art of not being seen.

  • Of course they will have arms training and parachuting courses, but they will also learn

  • martial arts and go on very, very long hikes. One of those is 75 miles (120km), with a heavy

  • backpack on and with weapons. One of the particularly dangerous things they

  • have to do is part of their orienteering exercises. Soldiers are taken to some jungle or desert

  • or mountainous region in a foreign country and are expected to survive, get out of there,

  • and arrive at a specific location. This is the kind of exercise that a lot of

  • special forces do around the world. The one big difference with Sayeret Matkal is that

  • soldiers get dropped off by themselves. They are of course monitored from a distance, but

  • they have no one to help them if they need a helping hand. They have no one to talk during

  • those dark nights in the jungle. That must be utterly terrifying.

  • Sometimes the land won't be jungle, but the guys will be left in swamps or rivers

  • for hours, even days, in locations all over the world. Sometimes just one recruit will

  • be sent out alone and told to evade capture for as long as possible. The guys coming after

  • him are the people that have already been through the training.

  • Now we think you should watch this video, “What Are The MOST ELITE Special Forces

  • in the World?” or this videoWhat Makes Black Ops The World's Most Dangerous Soldiers?”

For days on end you've been walking, carrying a rucksack on your back that is pretty much

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B1 INT training sas phase hell men week

These Insane Military Training Programs Will Destroy You

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    Summer   posted on 2020/09/04
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