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  • We're doing it again.

  • Building your skill to think in English so you can join the conversation with confidence,

  • stop translating in your head

  • and be more effective in communication.

  • If you feel like it takes too long to express yourself in English, or you feel nervous speaking English,

  • this video is for you.

  • Thinking in English and getting your mind to go to English quickly is a skill you can build on.

  • In today's video, we're working with flash cards to focus on words. We're going to do nouns, verbs, and adjectives.

  • And we're going to build the English image association,

  • skipping your native language. There might be some words you don't know.

  • Great! Then you get to learn new vocabulary too.

  • As always, if you like this video or you learned something new,

  • please like and subscribe with notifications, it really helps.

  • In doing this, we want to use words you already know.

  • Learning vocabulary is different.

  • This is a skill where we're building the skill to think in English first,

  • building those pathways in your brain, so hopefully many of these words will be words that you already know.

  • Before you start the exercise, say to your brain: we're going to think only in English.

  • You'll see a prompt, and you'll think the word.

  • If you want to say it out loud, go ahead. If you don't know the word, don't worry,

  • we're going to go over everything at the end of the video.

  • First, you'll see a picture with different sections highlighted like this.

  • And when you see it, you'll think in your head: wing.

  • Then something else will be highlighted and each time you see a different highlight, think the English word.

  • If you don't know it, don't worry just wait for the next one.

  • Let's keep going with that image.

  • Then you'll see this.

  • And you'll have three seconds to come up with a verb to describe anything that's happening in the picture.

  • Any verb, any action that's happening.

  • And then you'll see this.

  • And you'll have three seconds to name an adjective.

  • An adverb would be fine too.

  • Then at the end, we'll go over everything like this.

  • Wing, beak, claw.

  • Or maybe you just said foot.

  • Flying or landing.

  • White, or maybe you said graceful.

  • I'll suggest verbs and adjectives that you could have said,

  • but of course you may have come up with something totally different from what I say, and that's okay.

  • There are no wrong answers here if what you're saying describes anything that's happening in the picture.

  • Now if you saw that image, and you said something like drinking Coke.

  • Then that doesn't actually describe what's happening, but hey,

  • if your mind said that in English, that's something!

  • We're going to move pretty quickly. So just relax,

  • open up your mind, and let the English come in.

  • Remember, you want to direct your mind to go to the English word first.

  • You should know most of these words already, we're building the skill of recall.

  • We're going to do a bunch of pictures and then we'll go over all the words.

  • Okay we're halfway through, and I'm checking in on you.

  • How are you doing? Is it fun? Stressful?

  • Let's take a minute to reset our minds,

  • clear it out, think English only, keep going.

  • Great!

  • Were the verbs and adjectives harder?

  • It was less about naming something you see, and more about making a decision about what to say.

  • That's definitely a little bit more challenging.

  • Let's go over some possible answers now.

  • Knees.

  • Hair.

  • Grill.

  • Did you know this part of the car is called a grill?

  • I didn't know that until I was older.

  • Probably high school.

  • I have a whole video that goes over vocabulary for the car. I'll link to it at the end of the video.

  • Windshield.

  • Notice here the D comes after an N before another consonant sound.

  • It's very common to drop that D sound and I did.

  • Windshield.

  • Windshield.

  • Laying. Chatting. Maybe you said laughing.

  • Friendly.

  • Wait, what happened there?

  • Again the D comes after an N, before a consonant,

  • very common to drop that D.

  • I didn't say friendly, but there's no D, friendly.

  • Or maybe you said dirty, talking about the truck, old,

  • or maybe happy talking about the girls.

  • Swimsuit.

  • Maybe you said swim trunks, or just trunks, or maybe you said shorts.

  • Rock.

  • Bowl.

  • Or maybe you said container.

  • Splashing.

  • Covering.

  • Playing.

  • Fun.

  • Playful.

  • Or maybe you hate being splashed, so the word you thought was: mean.

  • Bench, hat, book, ear, finger.

  • We call this smallest finger, the pinky.

  • Laughing, reading.

  • Sunny, happy.

  • Masks, scrubs.

  • We call this kind of clothing, which you'll see a lot on doctors, nurses, dentists, and veterinarians.

  • Scrubs.

  • There is a TV show in the US called Scrubs that ran in the 2000s.

  • Light switch.

  • Mirror.

  • Tray.

  • Cleaning. Fixing. Working.

  • Focused.

  • r maybe you said: blue or yellow, describing a color in the photo,

  • or scared because maybe you hate going to the dentist.

  • Laptop. Or maybe you said computer.

  • Braid. Or maybe you just said hair.

  • Hair tie. We're getting detailed here.

  • These are also called elastics.

  • Stripes. This pattern is called stripes.

  • Or maybe you said shoulder since that's the part of the shirt that I circled.

  • Playing. Pointing. Winning.

  • Maybe you said cheering.

  • Excited. Elated.

  • Vest.

  • This article of clothing is called a vest.

  • I have a whole video that goes over vocabulary words for clothing.

  • I'll link to it at the end of this video.

  • Bubble. Sleeve.

  • This part of the shirt is called the sleeve,

  • or maybe you said arm since that's the body part that goes in the sleeve.

  • Zipper. Polka dots.

  • This pattern is called polka dots with a silent L.

  • Blowing. Playing. Trying.

  • Concentrating. Young. Engaged.

  • We use the word engaged to describe committing to marry someone,

  • but we also use it to mean engrossed in something, really concentrated in it.

  • Paying full attention.

  • Quartet. When I drew this, I was thinking quartet, but maybe you said men or players or musicians.

  • Violin.

  • Viola.

  • This instrument that's a little bigger than a violin is called a viola.

  • Cello.

  • Bow.

  • There's another word spelled the same way but pronounced: bow with the OW diphthong.

  • That's something that a performer might do at the end of a concert.

  • Performers will bow during the audience applause.

  • Stand or music stand.

  • Column. This word has a silent N at the end.

  • Smiling. Formal.

  • Musical. Coordinated.

  • Watch. Belt. Collar. Lapel. Tie.

  • This can be called a jacket or blazer.

  • Handshake.

  • Again the D after an N before a consonant.

  • That D will usually be dropped. Handshake. No D sound.

  • Shaking hands. Making a deal. Agreeing. Committing.

  • Professional. Pleased.

  • Teddy bear. Tablecloth.

  • Or maybe you said lace, since that's what it's made of, or table since that's what it's covering.

  • Balloon.

  • Cake.

  • Celebrating.

  • Playing.

  • Pink.

  • Silly.

  • Gloves.

  • Or maybe you said hands.

  • Again D after an N before a consonant in the word hands. We usually won't say that D sound. Hands.

  • Apron.

  • Scissors.

  • Spatula.

  • Notice the letter T here makes a CH sound.

  • I think a lot of people would probably misspell this word putting in a CH.

  • Spatula.

  • Cooking.

  • Working.

  • Making.

  • Preparing.

  • Grilling.

  • Korean.

  • Tasty.

  • Luggage. Or maybe you said suitcase.

  • Umbrella.

  • Sign. Or menu.

  • Waiter, or server.

  • Eating. Dining. Talking. Working.

  • Busy.

  • Full. Crowded.

  • Hungry.

  • Or if you're describing the two umbrellas maybe you thought open and closed.

  • The more you do this kind of thing where you walk into a room or look at a picture

  • and try to describe everything in English in your head,

  • the quicker you'll be able to think in English when you're in a conversation.

  • You're just simply training your brain to use English for thoughts.

  • You can do this by doing some every day. I challenge you every day this week, pick a photo.

  • When you see in the newspaper or on social media, try to name as many objects as you can,

  • then choose a verb or an adjective to further describe what you see.

  • Go on describing what you see in full sentences.

  • We have a video where we practice doing just that together.

  • It's in our Think In English Playlist. Be sure to check it out.

  • And here are those vocabulary videos I told you about.

  • I make new videos on the English language every Tuesday.

  • Be sure to subscribe.

  • I also run an academy online to help you train and take your English communication skill to the next level,

  • Rachel's English Academy, be sure to check it out.

  • That's it and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

We're doing it again.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 skill vocabulary consonant windshield describe sleeve

Think in English | Here’s exactly how to stop translating in your head!

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    Summer posted on 2020/09/01
Video vocabulary