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  • (humming)

  • (upbeat instrumental music)

  • - Hello everybody, it's me Dr. Sandra Lee,

  • aka Dr. Pimple Popper.

  • I am a board certified dermatologist

  • at private practice in Southern California.

  • And you may know me more for my pimple popping these days.

  • So I did a video called "Go to Bed With Me"

  • and today we're going to react to the comments

  • from the video.

  • And a little bit later I'm going to answer

  • some of your questions that you guys have about acne.

  • (upbeat instrumental music)

  • Here we go.

  • Okay Margarita says,

  • "Her, so cleansing wipes,

  • "me, screams in pain." In parenthesis, okay.

  • Cleansing wipes, I know there's a lot of debate

  • and there's a lot of controversy on the internet

  • about cleaning wipes.

  • There are a lot of people that are strongly against them.

  • I use cleansing wipes and I do know a lot of dermatologists

  • a lot of professionals use cleansing wipes

  • and I think that they're fine to use.

  • I don't use them on a daily basis.

  • I think that they can be rough on your skin.

  • I definitely pat my skin with them

  • and I don't use them solely to clean my face.

  • They're sort of used if I have heavy make-up on,

  • if I'm on the run, if I'm traveling

  • and I really want to get some make-up off

  • and clean my face, but I don't have a sink in front me

  • and I can't completely wash my face.

  • People complain too that it...

  • Or they say that it could be really bad for our environment

  • and I know that we're all doing the best we can

  • to save the environment and so I understand that.

  • So if you're against cleansing wipes, don't use them.

  • I mean if you feel better about not wasting something

  • I completely understand that.

  • But I do think that there is a place for them in a routine

  • because they do make life a little easier for us.

  • Okay so here's the next question, Lisa Rose says,

  • "I thought micro-tears were a myth."

  • Well anything can cause tears in your skin

  • I mean even if you rub your rough finger on your skin,

  • it can cause micro-tears.

  • And I mean that's what our skin is designed for.

  • Our skin is there to help protect what's underneath.

  • And it's there to handle any tears

  • or any disruptions in your skin.

  • I mean even the sun when it hits your face

  • it's gonna cause damage.

  • Everything does, pollutants in the atmosphere,

  • all of this, so.

  • I think as we get older we are certainly more careful

  • about things that really rub hard on our face.

  • And not even so much that our skin gets

  • less resilient to things,

  • but more so that we're so conscious of it

  • because we are more conscious of maybe like

  • fine lines and wrinkles on our skin.

  • And we're trying to keep our skin young

  • for as long as we can.

  • I'm certainly less rough on my skin, as I get older.

  • And I think that is probably the truth for many people.

  • But you know micro-tears it's a daily occurrence for us,

  • for many reasons.

  • "People should listen to these professionals only,

  • "don't listen to YouTuber's

  • "who just promote products/brands."

  • You just really have to be careful on the internet,

  • I find this more and more lately actually.

  • I think it's going to become a problem,

  • that people say things and it sort of like

  • it kind of snow-balls and then it becomes so

  • spoken about so often that it becomes like this truth

  • that everybody believes in.

  • Recently I talked about,

  • I think even in this "Go to Bed" series

  • I talked about using, CeraVe or Cetaphil Cleansers

  • and some people get a little angry about that.

  • And they say that there are carcinogens

  • or there are cancer causing agents in there.

  • I will tell you I don't know a single

  • board certified dermatologist that would say

  • don't use these products because they can cause cancer.

  • I mean, and that should tell you something, I think.

  • We went to medical school,

  • we did our residency for three years,

  • some of us did a Fellowship.

  • I got out of school when I was 32 years old.

  • I mean we had specific training

  • in all conditions of the skin, the hair, and the nails.

  • So I think the bottom line is

  • that you should do your own research.

  • And trust your own research really.

  • And really consult with experts in your area.

  • A great board certified dermatologist

  • would be a great start.

  • Lemon Sorbet says, "Since she applies deodorant at night

  • "did she insinuate she doesn't apply it in the morning?

  • "This is the simplest, most affordable routine as of yet,

  • "apart from the syringe."

  • I do apply deodorant in the morning too.

  • I apply deodorant in the night

  • and I think I explained it in the video,

  • because our sweat glands are not as active at night,

  • they're more dormant, they're sleeping, like along with us.

  • It's kind of better to apply deodorant at night

  • and it kind of helps to make it more effective.

  • But I definitely apply it in the morning.

  • I definitely apply it more when I'm sweating more

  • you know during certain times of the year.

  • But I also do Botox in the summer to my arm pits.

  • Not everybody may be able to do that,

  • I'm not telling people that they should do that.

  • But that actually does work amazingly well,

  • to help with sweat control in the area.

  • All right next, David Fletcher,

  • "It's amazing watching all of these celebrities

  • "YouTube stars, with their uber complicated

  • "expensive skin care routines,

  • "then most dermatologists have basic routines

  • "with basic products from the drugstores."

  • Yes, this is true.

  • And I do see this, and I notice this in the comments

  • and I notice this in a lot of videos.

  • You don't have to spend a lot of money

  • to take care of your skin.

  • I understand what it's like to use a really expensive cream,

  • it smells good, it feels good,

  • it makes you feel more luxurious.

  • But if you don't have the money to afford it,

  • it is not going to give you better skin than using a more

  • inexpensive drugstore variety cleanser or moisturizer.

  • I mean I love Aquaphor, I love just plain Vaseline,

  • to put in places that are really dry.

  • I love CeraVe, I love Cetaphil, I love Neutrogena,

  • all the products that are sort of, they're like

  • dermatology recommended.

  • So you know, don't discount

  • the inexpensive brands out there.

  • S-K says, "I love her"

  • I love you to S-K.

  • "And great tip before your wedding or special event,

  • "go to a derm and get the deep-zit injection for Cortisone."

  • That's true.

  • Cat in Wonderland says, "Love, love, love,

  • "when my dermatologist injects my pimples."

  • Yes that's a special kind of trick, sort of,

  • that we have as dermatologists,

  • in fact I carry that in my travel kit anywhere I go.

  • I have a little injection ready to inject a pimple

  • that I might have,

  • or even maybe a friend might have with me.

  • It's great because Cortisone,

  • a low-potency Cortisone injected directly into a pimple

  • will actually stop it's progression.

  • And potentially resolve it within 24 hours.

  • What I'm injecting is a low-potency Corticosteroid.

  • So a steroid like this, like Prednisone, or Kenalog

  • actually can be injected for multiple reasons.

  • What we do is we dilute this steroid to a really

  • really low-potency to inject directly into a pimple

  • so it does not spread systemically,

  • it doesn't affect the rest of your body,

  • it just locally calms that pimple down.

  • What they essentially do,

  • is they blunt your immune system.

  • Your immune system is so revved up,

  • it's attacking this pimple, this bacteria there

  • and making it really red and painful and swollen.

  • We are injecting something directly into it

  • to sort of settle it down, saying chill out,

  • just calm down and that's what it does.

  • Okay, Ryan Sims says, "Watching this I like

  • "getting a free consultation advice

  • "from a dermatologist without actually,

  • "you know having to pay for the session."

  • I think that's what it was meant to be.

  • I mean that's what I was trying to do

  • and that's what we try to do,

  • that's what I try to do in all of my videos, really.

  • And on my T.V. show is really just try to

  • give you advice honestly, from my perspective

  • as a board certified dermatologist

  • and I think that's what we all try to do.

  • Really the point of it is really making sure that people

  • feel good in their own skin.

  • Sometimes when you get down this rabbit hole

  • of watching all these skin care advice videos,

  • from various people, it can make you feel bad about yourself

  • in your own skin, you compare yourself.

  • Just know that there are really simple things

  • that you can do.

  • And to really feel proud in whatever skin that you have,

  • and feel good in the skin that you're in.

  • It's Echo says, "One thing I regret too,

  • "is rubbing my eyes, it would feel so good

  • "now I feel like I have dark circles from doing that."

  • Yes I think I talked about that a little bit,

  • how maybe I have a little bit of darkness around my eyes,

  • and rubbing your eyes, like if you have a little allergy,

  • and you rub your eyes every now and then,

  • that actually contributes to darkening around your eyes,

  • and dark circles.

  • Especially those of us who have a little darker complexion.

  • We're more prone to that.

  • So if you find that you have dark circles under your eyes,

  • or around your eyes, and you tend to rub your eyes

  • a little bit, you might want to really

  • focus on taking an anti-allergy medication,

  • to try to nip your allergy issues in the bud

  • so that you won't have this tendency to rub your eyes

  • or really try to focus on keeping your hand off of it.

  • Because the more you rub the more the skin

  • gets a little rough or thickened

  • and looks older and the more the area can darken.

  • Okay next.

  • Karen Fulton, "Any ideas on how to prevent milia

  • on the eyelids and eye area?

  • "I have heard that eye shadow with fragrance

  • "can aggravate this condition."

  • I don't know about eyeshadow with fragrance specifically

  • but I think that just products that occlude your skin

  • there more so, can promote milia formation.

  • But the skin there is very thin,

  • it's the thinnest skin on our body.

  • So it is probably more prone to being a occluded or blocked

  • than other areas of our body.

  • So that's why, that is an area

  • that is more prone to milia development.

  • So milia are those white pearly bumps that you get

  • predominantly around your eyes.

  • You'll kind of feel them and they'll feel,

  • your fingernail will run over them,

  • they're under the skin so it's not like a pimple

  • that you can really squeeze them out,

  • but they're usually like,

  • they look kind of like a pimple,

  • just like a white bump.

  • We as dermatologists we can remove them in the office

  • if we nick the skin and kind of use a Comedone Extractor

  • and push them out, it's like a little pearl we call them

  • because they look like a little perfect circle.

  • They're actually just really superficial, tiny cysts.

  • Sot they have a tiny little thin sack around them.

  • And that's what makes them sometimes difficult to push out.

  • I just had a milia right on my upper eyelid here