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  • Hi, welcome to www.engvid.com , I'm Adam.

  • In today's video, we're going to look at some phrasal verbs with the verb "check".

  • Now, as you know, a phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition that, together,

  • can have very different meanings - more than one meaning, or very different from the actual

  • words themselves.

  • Now, this was actually a request on www.engvid.com , so let's look at these.

  • We're going to look at check out, check in, for, into, off, on or upon - can be the same

  • thing, over, through, with and back.

  • Now, checkup and checkout are not verbs.

  • They're actually nouns, okay, but I'll explain those separately.

  • So, we're going to start with "check out".

  • Now, most phrasal verbs have like, one, two, three meanings, maybe four.

  • Check out actually has quite a few, we have six of them.

  • And we're going to look at them - I'm going to write them down so you can remember them.

  • Now, most people, I think, understand "check out", for example, out of a hotel.

  • When you're done with your stay at the hotel, you go down to the reception.

  • You pay your bill, you finish everything there, and you leave, okay?

  • So, that's check out.

  • Pay and leave.

  • Now, "checkout" is very closely related.

  • When you go to a supermarket or a store and you get your items and you're ready to pay,

  • you go to the checkout.

  • This is the cashier or the place where you pay and you get your receipt and you move

  • on, okay?

  • Again, remember, when you have the verb and the preposition squeezed together into one

  • word, it becomes a noun.

  • Now, check out.

  • You can also use it to mean look at.

  • When you want to tell somebody to look at something or to pay attention to something,

  • you can say, "Check that out".

  • So, for example, I'm looking at a big truck and I'm thinking "Oh, those are huge, nice

  • tires.

  • Check out the tires on the truck", right?

  • Look at, make sure you pay attention to it.

  • Excuse me.

  • You can also use it to mean "investigate".

  • So, we have some problems at our downtown office.

  • I'm going to go there this afternoon and check it out.

  • I'm going to go find out, another way to say it is "find out".

  • Find out what the problem is.

  • So, check out the situation, investigate, figure out what the problem is.

  • Now, to confirm.

  • When something checks out, it means that it - the story is confirmed or something is true,

  • okay?

  • So, for example, I have a student and he - my student didn't come to class today.

  • And then the next day, he said "Oh, my mother was sick.

  • I had to stay home, so I couldn't come to class."

  • But I don't trust this student.

  • He often makes up excuses.

  • So, I call his house and I speak to his mother and she said, "Yes, I was sick, so my son

  • had to stay home and help me."

  • So, his story checks out.

  • It's confirmed.

  • It's true.

  • I know it's true, I can trust him.

  • Okay?

  • Another meaning, it's more of a slang meaning, is die.

  • If somebody checks out, or if somebody checked out, it means they died.

  • It's a bit - again, slang, so it's very informal.

  • You don't necessarily want to use it when you're talking about family or friends or

  • whatever.

  • "Oh, they checked out."

  • You'll see it more in movies and TV shows, etc.

  • And then finally, there's in the library.

  • You go to the library, you find the book you want or you need, you go to the librarian,

  • you give your card.

  • She takes your name, puts a date, a due date on the book, and you check it out.

  • You take it home with you, you bring it back later.

  • So, you check it out of the library.

  • You register it out.

  • Check in.

  • So, check in has a couple of meanings.

  • Again, the opposite in the hotel.

  • When you arrive at the hotel, you go to the concierge or you go to the reception, you

  • give your name, you sign, you go to your room.

  • In an airport, in the airport, you have your baggage that you're not taking with you on

  • the plane.

  • It's going to basically go in the cargo hold to your destination.

  • So, you check in your baggage.

  • You give it to them to take care of.

  • And check in can also mean, basically, to let somebody know your situation that you're

  • - what's going on with you.

  • So, for example, I work for a company and I'm out of the office all day.

  • So, around noon or 1:00, I call in just to check in, just to let them know yes, I'm still

  • here.

  • Yes, I'm working.

  • This is the situation.

  • I'll call you back later this afternoon.

  • So, check in, just let them, let somebody know where you are, what you're doing, etc.

  • Check for is the same as - check out in terms of look for something, but when you check

  • for, you're looking for something specific, okay?

  • So, somebody gives me their document and they ask me to check it for grammar errors.

  • So, I'm reading through and I look specifically for grammar mistakes, okay?

  • Check into, now check into can be similar to check in.

  • You can check into your hotel, but more common - more often, we use check into to talk about

  • something more serious, usually medical.

  • You can check into hospital.

  • It means you go in there and you stay there for as long as you need to be remedied.

  • For example, alcoholics, when they feel they've gone to the point that they just need somebody

  • to help them get off the alcohol, they will check into a rehab or a rehabilitation center.

  • They will stay there.

  • Somebody will help them get off the alcohol and when they're ready, they will go back

  • out into the world.

  • Okay?

  • Next, when you have a list.

  • For example, a to-do list.

  • These are the things I need to get done today.

  • As you complete each task, you check it off.

  • So, this is a check mark.

  • Check!

  • So, when you check something off, you take it off your list.

  • It's done, move on to the next item, okay?

  • Check up on, basically it means check, like go see how somebody is doing.

  • So, my friend is sick.

  • I haven't seen him all day.

  • He didn't come to the office.

  • So, after work, I go by his house just to check up on him, or just to check on him.

  • Make sure he's okay, if he doesn't need any food or medicine or anything like that.

  • Check over and check through are very similar.

  • It means you're looking for something within something.

  • Now, check over, you're going to talk about documents or papers or materials.

  • So, you check over the documents to make sure there are no errors, to make sure there's

  • nothing missing.

  • When you check through, it's usually something physical, like a pile of clothes.

  • So, I left my wallet in my jeans, and I put my jeans in the laundry basket.

  • So, I'm checking through all the clothes until I find my wallet and take it out.

  • So, check over documents, check through clothes, for example.

  • So, check with.

  • With you check with somebody about something, means you want to ask them for permission

  • or availability or anything like that.

  • You want to make sure that that person knows or allows you to do something.

  • So, for example, next week I want to go on vacation.

  • So, I go - before I book my plane ticket, I need to check with my boss to make sure

  • it's okay.

  • Make sure we're not too busy and I can take the time off.

  • So, I check with my boss.

  • My boss says okay, I book my ticket.

  • Check back means just come back and ask me again, right?

  • So, somebody asks me - I go to my boss, I'll use the same example.

  • I go to my boss, I say, "Can I take a week off for vacation?"

  • He says, "You know what?

  • I don't know the schedule yet.

  • Check back with me later today."

  • Check back with me, ask me again later today.

  • Now, I already mentioned checkout is a noun, the cashier.

  • Checkup, now you can go to the doctor and he will check you up, but we don't necessarily

  • - we don't use that expression very commonly.

  • We use the noun.

  • I go to the doctor for a checkup, or he performs a checkup on me.

  • It means he does blood tests or urine sample or whatever.

  • He looks everywhere, makes sure I'm okay, and then sends me home or gives me some medicine,

  • depending on the case.

  • So, there you have it.

  • Phrasals with "check".

  • If you have any questions about these, please go to www.engvid.com and ask me in the forums

  • section.

  • There's also a quiz where you can test your understanding of these phrasal verbs and see

  • - make sure that you know how to use them.

  • And that's it.

  • I hope you liked this video.

  • Please give me a like if you did.

  • Please subscribe to my channel on YouTube and come back for more lessons on vocab, grammar,

  • all the good stuff.

  • See you then.

Hi, welcome to www.engvid.com , I'm Adam.

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A2 check phrasal checkup checkout boss hotel

Phrasal Verbs: CHECK – check up, check out, check off...

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    Summer posted on 2020/08/24
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