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  • Just after 1 A.M on March 8th, 2014, Malaysian Airlines Flight Number 370, en route to Beijing,

  • China from Kuala Lumpur, checked in with Malaysian air traffic control.

  • Good night, Malaysia Three Seven Zerowere the last words anyone heard from flight

  • MH370 before the Boeing 777 disappeared from the face of the earth with 239 souls on board.

  • Now, 6 years later, there are still more questions than answers about the Malaysian Air Mystery

  • - and what we now know about missing flight MH370 is truly shocking.

  • Almost immediately after the last check-in, just as the plane was crossing from Malaysian

  • airspace into Vietnamese airspace, flight MH370 disappeared from radar screens.

  • In the confusion of the zone crossing, it took more than 18 minutes for air traffic

  • controllers to even notice that the plane was missing.

  • Officials on the ground attempted to reach the aircraft numerous times over the next

  • several hours, but the calls went unanswered.

  • The official distress call alerting Kuala Lumpur's Aeronautical Rescue Coordination

  • Centre that an aircraft and its passengers might be in mortal danger wasn't made until

  • after 6 A.M., more than 4 hours after the plane disappeared.

  • Early search efforts focused on the South China sea, but 34 ships and 28 aircraft from

  • 7 different countries could find no trace of the plane.

  • It quickly became apparent that they were looking in the entirely wrong area.

  • Within a matter of days after the plane's disappearance, analysis of radar and satellite

  • data provided the shocking details of flight MH370's final hours.

  • Almost immediately after the good night message, the plane veered dramatically off course.

  • It first made an abrupt turn to the southwest and flew back over the Malay Peninsula, then

  • banked around the island of Penang before heading northwest up the Strait of Malacca

  • and out across the Andaman Sea.

  • This maneuver took more than an hour to accomplish, but the most shocking revelation from the

  • radar data was the fact that, after the deviation, the plane cruised on autopilot for hours before

  • it ran out of fuel and plunged into the Indian Ocean, thousands of miles away from the initial

  • search area.

  • There were 3 major investigations in the immediate aftermath of the crash.

  • Australia led the main investigations and search efforts, as they were the closest to

  • the assumed crash site 1200 miles southwest of Perth, and were well-equipped to handle

  • a major marine search.

  • They began searching by air, but found no trace of the plane.

  • The time wasted searching the South China Sea likely cost them any chance of recovering

  • the wreckage and the plane's black boxes.

  • After 2 months of fruitless air searches, the team turned their attention to mapping

  • and scouring the ocean floor in one of the deepest, most unexplored regions of the Indian

  • Ocean.

  • Unsurprisingly, their efforts failed to find any sign of the plane, and the investigation

  • was closed after 3 years.

  • The Malaysian police conducted their own internal investigation, which mainly consisted of background

  • checks on the passengers and crew.

  • The results were underwhelming to say the least - the report was released in 2017, and

  • it concluded that they wereunable to determine a causefor the disappearance of flight

  • MH370.

  • It also cleared all passengers and crew of any suspicion.

  • The third official investigation was an international accident inquiry, and it was a mess from the

  • start.

  • International cooperation in the immediate aftermath of a tragedy is difficult under

  • the best of circumstances, but dealing with the autocratic and corrupt Malaysian regime

  • made it nearly impossible to conduct a thorough investigation.

  • It was clear that the Malaysians just wanted the whole situation to go away.

  • It's unlikely that they were covering up anything sinister - they simply didn't know

  • what they would find if they looked too closely, and they couldn't risk uncovering anything

  • that would reflect poorly on the government or its airline.

  • It quickly became obvious that the Malaysians knew a lot more about the disappearance than

  • what they shared with the world.

  • A Malaysian military base picked up the plane on their radar after it deviated from its

  • flight path, but they neglected to investigate the unexpected aircraft because it looked

  • friendly”.

  • The Malaysians knew about the change in flight path early on, and withheld that information

  • even as rescuers wasted precious hours and days searching in the wrong area.

  • In time, more details that Malaysian officials tried to keep secret would find their way

  • to the public and help paint a picture of what happened to flight MH370, and why - but

  • at the time, due to a lack of cooperation and reliable data, the third investigation

  • was also unable to determine a cause for the disappearance, and was closed.

  • While official investigations proved inconclusive, the search continues to this day, and recent

  • finds have led to many new revelations about the fate of flight MH370.

  • A group of volunteer engineers and scientists who met online and called themselves the Independent

  • Group studied the available data and helped narrow down the search area.

  • Using radar and satellite data, investigators and volunteers were able to recreate the plane's

  • trajectory and pinpoint it's last known location.

  • As the plane cruised south over the vast expanse of ocean towards Antarctica, which was far

  • outside of its range, it crossed paths with a satellite, and their electronichandshake

  • provides us with a general idea of the plane's last known location somewhere southwest of

  • Australia.

  • Other investigators used a different tactic, working backwards from locations where debris

  • eventually drifted ashore, and analyzing weather systems, drift patterns and currents to recreate

  • the debris' journey and find the plane's final resting place.

  • This is a much bigger task that you might imagine, consider the millions of square miles

  • of water and tens of thousands of miles of coastline in the Indian Ocean.

  • Experts also had to worry about a phenomenon that they dubbedThe Gibson Effect” - searchers

  • focusing their attention on areas where debris had already been found, simply because people

  • were already looking there, can take focus off of other areas, particularly to the North,

  • where debris might yet be found, and skew the data.

  • The Gibson Effect was named for Blaine Gibson, an American lawyer-slash-adventurer whose

  • goal is to visit every country in the world.

  • Gibson also can't resist a mystery, and since learning of the fate of flight MH370,

  • he has arranged his travels to allow him to help in the search efforts.

  • After visiting Malaysia and meeting some of the families of those lost on flight MH370,

  • Gibson figured that the best way he could help was by being on the ground - he began

  • visiting coastal areas where debris might wash up and painstakingly combing the beaches

  • for clues.

  • Even though this amounted to searching for a needle in a haystack, Gibson's crazy idea

  • actually paid off.

  • On the advice of some Australian oceanographers about ocean currents and drift patterns, Gibson

  • first visited Mozambique, where he asked local fishermen to show him where they would often

  • find washed up nets and fishing equipment.

  • Against all odds, there he found a scrap of metal that looked suspiciously like a plane

  • part, and it was later confirmed to be a part of MH370's horizontal stabilizer panel.

  • More discoveries would follow, and Gibson built a network of locals all along the Indian

  • Ocean coastline who would bring - or sell - him their finds.

  • In the end, of the several dozens of pieces of debris found that were confirmed or suspected

  • to be from MH370, Gibson would be personally responsible for finding one third of those

  • pieces.

  • And in case he ever forgot why he was doing this, he often found empty purses and backpacks

  • washed up along with the debris, a haunting reminder of the lives lost.

  • So, what are the biggest things we've learned in the years since Malaysian Flight MH370

  • disappeared?

  • What do we know now that we didn't know back then?

  • Well, first of all, we know we can rule out most of the prevailing conspiracy theories

  • about Flight MH370 that are kicking around online.

  • There's a faction that claims that the unusual signals picked up by radar and satellite were

  • fraudulent, designed to disguise the plane's true flight - although proponents of this

  • theory don't seem to have any idea what the point of thattrueflight was.

  • There's also the British tarot card reader who was sailing near South Asia when she witnessed

  • what looked like a missile or plane on a suicide mission flying low overhead, headed for a

  • nearby Chinese fleet.

  • When she returned from her holiday and learned of the disappearance of flight MH370, she

  • concluded that what she had seen must have been the missing plane, and spread her theory

  • across the web, despite being nowhere near the plane's path.

  • There are even those who believe that the plane flew into some sort of a time warp or

  • black hole.

  • According to William Langewiesche, a writer for The Atlantic, none of these theories hold

  • any water, and even the less outlandish ones oftenignore the satellite data, and in

  • some cases, also the radar tracks, the aircraft systems, the air-traffic-control record, the

  • physics of flight, and the basic contours of planetary geography.”

  • And of course, there are also plenty of people who are looking to capitalize on the tragedy

  • and mystery.

  • One Australian man claimed to have found the plane's wreckage on Google Earth, sitting

  • intact in shallow waters.

  • Obviously, he refuses to give up the location of this monumental find until his Kickstarter

  • campaign for an expedition is fully funded...

  • If we ignore the straight-up conspiracies and frauds, what are we left with?

  • Based on everything we've learned in the last few years, experts can make some assumptions

  • about what happened in those final hours on board Malaysian Flight MH370.

  • We know that when the plane deviated from it's planned flight path, it was an intentional

  • move - in order to make the tight maneuvers used to turn around, the plane would have

  • to have been operated by hand.

  • We also know that the plane then cruised on autopilot for 6 full hours in the direction

  • of Antarctica before it ran out of fuel.

  • Based on the dramatic final descent - the plane reached speeds of 15,000 feet per second

  • before abruptly crashing into the water and exploding into a thousand pieces - experts

  • have assumed that the final maneuver was intentional, since it was 5 times faster than we'd expect

  • an unassisted descent to be.

  • In light of this, it might be a relief to know that most of the passengers and crew

  • on board had probably passed away long before the dramatic last moments of flight MH370.

  • Flight data shows that, shortly after the initial turn, the plane's electronic systems

  • were disabled - including the cabin air pressurization system - and that whoever was in control of

  • the plane executed a dramatic climb that likely accelerated the depressurization of the cabin,

  • incapacitating and killing everyone on board.

  • The onboard oxygen masks, which would have dropped from above in the dimly lit cabin,

  • would have been no help at such a high altitude.

  • Everyone outside the cockpit would have quickly passed out and died gently within minutes,

  • with no choking or gasping for air.

  • The cockpit, on the other hand, had an hours-long supply of oxygen.

  • The most likely scenario to explain why flight MH370 disappeared is a dramatic case of pilot

  • suicide.

  • Although the official Malaysian report indicated no problems with either of the pilots, word

  • eventually spread that the Pilot in Charge, Zaharie Ahmad Shah, was recently divorced

  • and had been facing some personal issues, and he was likely clinically depressed.

  • He also had his own flight simulator at home, on which he had practiced the exact route

  • that the fated flight took.

  • But these are still just assumptions - there's still plenty we don't know about the tragic

  • disappearance of flight MH370.

  • We still don't know for sure who was in the cockpit during the deviation, the long

  • flight, and the ultimate end, and we don't know for sure why that person, whoever they

  • were, decided to do what they did.

  • We don't know why Malaysian military didn't intervene when they could, and why initial

  • search and rescue efforts were so delayed.

  • We also don't know what else Malaysian officials know that they haven't told us, or why they

  • are so reluctant to share.

  • And, of course, although we know roughly where the plane was just before it ran out of fuel,

  • we still don't know for sure where exactly the plane crashed.

  • Sadly, we'll probably never have all of the answers to these questions, and the mystery

  • of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 may never be fully solved.

  • But the search continues for the plane's wreckage, and we may know more in the future

  • than we know right now.

  • Now go watchTop 10 Deadliest Airplane Accidents that Ever Happened”, or you might

  • like this other one instead.

Just after 1 A.M on March 8th, 2014, Malaysian Airlines Flight Number 370, en route to Beijing,

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Malaysian Air Mystery, What We Now Know About Missing Flight MH370

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