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  • You can understand Americans effortlessly and speak very natural English

  • when you study the way we're going to today.

  • We're going to study English with the movie Venom, and look at all the things that make spoken English difficult.

  • Linking, reductions, changing the sounds of a word.

  • When you study these things and you know them,

  • you're going to be so much more comfortable and confident speaking English.

  • Study like this and you're going to be able to understand American movies and TV without subtitles.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • We're doing this all summer, we started in June, and we're going through August.

  • Stick with me, every Tuesday.

  • They're all great scenes, and there's going to be so much to learn

  • that can transform the way you understand and speak English.

  • And as always, if you like this video, or you learned something new,

  • please like and subscribe with notifications.

  • You're going to watch the clip then we're going to do a full pronunciation analysis together.

  • This is going to help so much with your listening comprehension

  • when it comes to watching English movies in TV.

  • But there's going to be a training section. You're going to take what you've just learned,

  • and practice repeating it, doing a reduction, flapping a T, just like you learned in the analysis.

  • Okay, here's the scene.

  • You're in luck, I've decided to work pro bono.

  • I'm joining the public defender's office.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • What about you? What are you going to do?

  • Uh, the network asked me to bring the show back. Uh, they want to start with a piece on Drake.

  • Oh, when? Really? So-what did you say?

  • Uh, I'm not, I'm not into it.

  • I want to concentrate on the written word.

  • And now, the analysis.

  • You're in luck, I've decided to work pro bono.

  • You're in luck-- You're in luck-- So if the melody starts lower, you're in luck--

  • it goes up for in, and comes back down as she finishes the word luck.

  • You're in luck-- you're in luck-- And everything links together, doesn't it?

  • There are no breaks, so we have this smooth change in pitch, this up down shape.

  • See if you can imitate that. We want a lot of smoothness in American English.

  • You're in luck--

  • You're in luck--

  • You're in luck--

  • This word 'you are' is not pronounced you're, but it's: yer yer, she reduces it.

  • That's the common pronunciation.

  • You can try to make it with no vowel: you're, you're, just a Y sound and an R sound:

  • you're, you're, you're, you're in luck, you're in luck.

  • You're in luck, you're in luck.

  • You're in luck, I've decided to work pro bono.

  • Luck, I've-- luck, I've-- ki've-- ki've-- ki've--

  • The K sound links right into the next word: I've with the AI diphthong, luck I've-- luck I've-

  • Luck, I've--

  • decided to work pro bono.

  • That word is unstressed. I've decided-- we have some of that up down shape there.

  • I've decided to work pro-- pro bono.

  • So some stress on pro, and also on bo, on pro, pro, it's going up, pro bono.

  • So we have three letters o there: pro bono, and they're all pronounced with the OH diphthong, oh, oh.

  • One mistake my students make sometimes is they'll say: oh, and they don't change the lip position,

  • oh, oh, we do need the change in the position, we go from more relaxed in the first sound,

  • to more rounded in the second sound, and that change is important. Pro bono. Pro bono.

  • I've decided to work pro bono.

  • I've decided to work pro bono.

  • I've decided to work pro bono.

  • I've decided to work- decided-- decided-- decided--

  • So the first syllable, said very quickly, de, de, and the last syllable said very quickly, ed, ed.

  • Decided. Decided. Decided. Uhhhh. The stress is really on that middle syllable. I've decided. I've decided.

  • I've decided--

  • Decide. So right from the D into a true T sound.

  • She wouldn't have to do that. It's common to drop it when the first sound is a D, the sound before is a D,

  • decided to--, decided to-- and just make it a schwa. But she does make a true T and then a schwa.

  • Decided to, decided to, decided to.

  • The important thing is that the vowel here is the schwa, and it's said very quickly.

  • It is unstressed. Decided to. I've decided to.

  • I've decided to--

  • to work pro bono.

  • Decided to work pro bono. Work also said pretty quickly. To work, to work, to work, to work.

  • This is a tricky word because it has the R vowel in it. Work.

  • One thing that can mess up my students is when they try to put a vowel in work, something like that.

  • It's just W consonant, think of there being no vowel, R sound, work, work,

  • you don't need much jaw drop for that. Work. Work.

  • See what happens for you if you take the vowel out. Work. Work.

  • Work--

  • pro bono.

  • I'm joining the public defender's office.

  • What are her most stressed syllables in this next sentence?

  • I'm joining the public defender's office.

  • I'm joining the public defender's office.

  • I'm joining the public defender's office.

  • I'm joining-- I'm joining the public defender's office.

  • So: join, pu--, fen, and ah--, all have the most stress.

  • The word I'm, I'm, AI diphthong, M. It's not fully pronounced here, I don't think. What do you think?

  • I'm joining--

  • I don't really hear the diphthong. I just hear the M consonant before the J.

  • I'm joining, mmmm, I'm joining, I'm joining.

  • It's a fairly common reduction. I'm joining. I'm joining.

  • I'm joining--

  • public defender's office.

  • So we have our stressed syllable join, then two unstressed syllables.

  • Ing the, ing the, ing the, ing the. I'm joining the public

  • I'm joining the public

  • I'm joining the public

  • I'm joining the public

  • Does it feel unnatural for you to make the pitch go up and down like this?

  • It might feel very strange to do that depending on your native language.

  • But that really helps with the native speakers understanding you because we're so used to that.

  • It might feel silly to you, but it's how we use the language. So don't be afraid to really change your pitch.

  • Joining the public. And joining the public. And joining the public.

  • That's what makes English clear to us. So challenge yourself to do that even if it feels silly.

  • I'm joining the public

  • I'm joining the public

  • I'm joining the public defender's office.

  • Public de-- So this ends in a K sound.

  • I don't hear it released. I don't hear: public, public, public defenders.

  • I hear public de-- So the sound stops. She puts her tongue up into position for the K.

  • Public de-- but then rather than just releasing a puff of air, she goes right into the D sound.

  • Public defender's office.

  • Public defender's office.

  • Public defender's office.

  • Public defender's office.

  • This here, apostrophe S showing possession, the office of the defender, of the public defender, is a Z sound.

  • Defender's office. And it links right into the vowel.

  • Defender's office.

  • Defender's office.

  • Defender's office.

  • Vowel can either be the AW as in law vowel or the AH as in father vowel. Defender's office.

  • Defender's office.

  • Defender's office.

  • Defender's office.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • How does he stress this? What words seem the most clear to you?

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • Good, per--, ann-- that's what I hear. You're a good person, Annie.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • Good person, Annie.

  • You're and a, both said very quickly.

  • You're a-- you're a-- you're a-- you're a—not: you're a-- you're a-- you're a-- you're a—

  • Very relaxed face. Very little jaw drop. You're a-- you're a-- you're a-- you're a--

  • I can do that without moving my jaw or my lips or my cheeks at all. It's just the tongue.

  • You're a-- you're a-- you're a-- you're a-- you're a—

  • See if you can do that. That kind of simplification of mouth movement is really important

  • to help you make these unstressed syllables very fast, to give them an unstressed feeling.

  • You're a-- you're a-- you're a good person.

  • You're a good person.

  • You're a good person.

  • You're a good person.

  • Good, good, good, good person. You know, even though I wrote this as stressed,

  • and I do think it has a bit of a stressed feel, it's actually pretty short, isn't it? Good, good, good, good, good.

  • There's not much of a vowel there.

  • This is the push vowel, uh, sugar, good,

  • but it's not good, it's good, good, good, good, good person, good person.

  • Good person--

  • Annie.

  • Good person, Annie. Nannie. The ending N links right onto the vowel AH.

  • This is what we want, we want this kind of linking. Good per--

  • these two sounds with no break in between.

  • You're a-- linked together: you're a good person, Annie.

  • Everything links together so smoothly.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • You're a good person, Annie.

  • With this word, person, person, make sure you don't put a OH sound in there. That's the schwa.

  • Schwa N. When those two go together, you don't really try to make a vowel at all.

  • Person, son, son. Right from S into N. Person. Person, Annie.

  • Person, Annie.

  • Person, Annie.

  • Person, Annie.

  • What about you? What are you going to do?

  • So these are two different questions but she doesn't put any break in between. They link together.

  • What are our stressed words here?

  • What about you? What are you going to do?

  • What about you? What are you going to do?

  • What about you? What are you going to do?

  • What about-- A little stress on the question word. What about you?

  • What are you going to do?

  • So those are our peaks of stress, I would say. What about you?

  • What about you?

  • What about you?

  • What about you?

  • What about you? What about-- What about-- What about--

  • She says this really quickly, doesn't she? She links the two words together with a flap, wha-dadadadadada.

  • What about-- What about--

  • We can do that sound more quickly than a true T. What about-- What about-- What about--

  • And that's why it gets changed. Weyou would never hear a native speaker do that.

  • What about-- What about-- What about-- What aboutRarara

  • Just the tongue bouncing on the roof of the mouth. What about--

  • The first sound there is the schwa.

  • What a-- What a-- What a—What aboutWhat about you? About--

  • Stop T, so again, not about, about, about you, but a stop T, about, about, about you, about you.

  • What about you?

  • By changing those T pronunciations, we can say them more quickly,

  • and we can make the whole line more smooth

  • without stopping the air with a stop and release. That's what we want.

  • What about you?

  • What about you?

  • What about you?

  • What about you?

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • Said really quickly, isn't it? There's a little bit of up down shape, a little bit more length on what and you,

  • but then really, most of the stress on do.

  • What are you going to do? What are-- What are

  • Just like here, what about, with the flap T, here we also have a flap T. What areWhat are

  • The word are reduces to schwa R.

  • What areWhat areWhat areWhat arewhat are you-- what are you-- what are you--

  • Everything links together so smoothly, doesn't it?

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • Going to, she pronounces that as gonna, very common reduction.

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • What are you going to do?

  • Uh, the network asked me to bring the show back.

  • Uhuh-- this is the sound we make when we're thinking.

  • What is the sound in your language that you make?

  • Uh-- it's very relaxed, open sounds, the uh as in butter vowel, uhuh

  • Uhuh

  • Uh, the network asked me to bring the show back.

  • The network asked me to bring the show back.

  • The network asked me to bring the show back.

  • I feel that those have that up down shape, the higher pitch,

  • and therefore feel more stressed. Let's look at the other syllables, the other words.

  • The network asked me to bring the show back.

  • The network asked me to bring the show back.

  • The network asked me to bring the show back.

  • Thealmost always unstressed, said quickly. The network, the network, network.

  • Do you notice that's a stop T? That's because the next word is a consonant.

  • The network

  • The network

  • The network asked me to bring the show back.

  • The network asked-- I don't really hear a released K here. If anything, I feel like it sounds almost like a light G.

  • The network asked-- the network askedkasked-- kasked-- kasked-- super light though, do not say: gassed.

  • The network asked-- The network asked--

  • Actually, I think it's going to work for you to think of it as a K or G. Either one, as long as it's extremely light,

  • and it links right into the vowel.

  • Kasked-- kasked-- kasked

  • The network asked--