Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hey there.

  • I'm Ronnie, and I am here to give you some advice.

  • I don't know about what, but I'm sure something - Oh, English.

  • Yeah, I'm an English teacher.

  • I'm here to give you some advice about giving advice in English.

  • So much advice happening right now.

  • Maybe you like to give people advice, or maybe you have a problem and you ask your friends

  • for advice.

  • Oh, I don't know what to do, you know.

  • I'm really bored at home.

  • I want to do something.

  • Friend, what should I do?

  • Okay?

  • So, your friend's going to tell you, "Ah, I've got a good idea for you.

  • You should go to the bark."

  • Brilliant, I'm out of here.

  • I'm going to the park, guys.

  • Nah, just joking.

  • Giving advice is something that we all do.

  • Some of us like to do more than others.

  • Mostly mothers, mmhmm.

  • And when we do that, we have specific grammar that we use.

  • We're going to use these modals - should, could, and would.

  • Now, these are modal verbs in English.

  • And an important thing to remember is that when we use these modal verbs, we're always

  • going to use a base verb.

  • So, we can't put -ing, we can't put the past tense.

  • Leave the verb alone, please.

  • Just use the base verb.

  • So, giving advice example.

  • I would say, "Oh, do you know what?

  • You should go for a bike ride."

  • You could go to the park.

  • I would.

  • You can say in a long sentence, "If I were you, I would go to the mall."

  • But I'm not you, and I would never go to the mall.

  • Bad advice, Ronnie.

  • So, you should or you could are exactly the same.

  • And I would, they all mean the same things, but the problem is when we have the subject

  • "I", you can't say "should" or "could".

  • With the subject "I", you can only use "would".

  • So, "I should" would be giving advice to yourself.

  • When you can do.

  • Wow, I should really do this.

  • Or, I could, you'd be talking to yourself.

  • But, if you're giving advice to another person, you would use "you".

  • You could use "he"; you could use "she" or "they", but be very, very careful.

  • "Would", we only use with the subject "I".

  • We could also ask the person a question.

  • We say, "Hey, do you know what?

  • Why don't you go to the park?"

  • If you wanted to use another person, we have to be careful and we have to make sure that

  • our verb and our subject agree.

  • I can say, "Oh, you know what?

  • Why doesn't he", or "Why doesn't she?"

  • So, be careful with this.

  • Basic grammar points that, a lot of the time, we make mistakes with.

  • But that's okay.

  • So, if you want to give some person advice, be my guest.

  • Have fun doing it.

  • You can also use "should" and "would" in the negative form.

  • So, if your friend says, "Oh, do you know what?

  • I really want to go on vacation, but I don't have enough money."

  • Say, "You know what?

  • You shouldn't go on vacation."

  • Most of the time, we're going to shorten "not" to "n't".

  • If I wanted to speak very formally, or emphasize something, I would say "You should not go

  • on vacation."

  • We cannot use it here, but we can use "would".

  • If I were you, I wouldn't go to the mall.

  • If I were you, I would not go to the mall.

  • It makes it much stronger.

  • This sentence, we would not change, because that's the only way we've got it.

  • But I have a problem, and my problem is especially, nowadays, that people think they know things

  • about everything.

  • They think they have all the information, because they googled something.

  • Or it's on the internet.

  • Guess what?

  • You don't know jack.

  • Who's Jack?

  • Ronnie, who's Jack?

  • "You don't know jack" is a slang expression to say, "Hm, you don't know what you're talking

  • about."

  • So, this lesson is actually, oh my god, please stop giving people advice if you don't know

  • what you're taking about!

  • Okay?

  • People, humans.

  • You can say to people, do you know what?

  • You have no idea what you're talking about.

  • So, your advice is absolutely useless.

  • You've got no clue!

  • These two are very similar.

  • They mean the same.

  • It means, you know what?

  • You don't have the knowledge to talk about this subject, so please stop giving me advice,

  • Mom.

  • No, Mom, no, I'm not saying that!

  • Very, very formally, and maybe if you're a little bit angry with someone, you could say,

  • "Do you know what?

  • You just can't comprehend what I'm going through.

  • You just don't understand my situation, so your advice doesn't help me."

  • Then we get into some slang.

  • You're talking bullsh*t.

  • Ronnie said a bad word again!

  • So, you can say "You're talking bull", which actually is a long from of bullsh*t.

  • So, "You're taking bull" means you're telling lies.

  • You're telling things that are not true.

  • You can say to someone, "Stop running your mouth."

  • Running, mouth, what, my mouth isn't running.

  • Running your mouth means you're talking about things that you have no idea or no clue about.

  • You don't know.

  • You're making it up as you go along.

  • And you're not helping the people.

  • As I said to you at the beginning, "You don't know jack!"

  • Now, if you're going to be super slang, you can say, "You don't know jacksh*t".

  • I don't know who Jack is, but apparently, he doesn't know you and he's really good with

  • advice.

  • So, if you have a friend that is always running their mouth, but they really have no clue

  • or no idea what they're talking about, stop getting advice from them.

  • Figure it out on your own, and please, people, educate yourselves to be intelligent humans.

  • If you think you know the answer, you better be damn sure.

  • Alright.

  • I'm done.

Hey there.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

A2 advice giving ronnie subject mall mouth

STOP giving advice in English!

  • 6 0
    Summer posted on 2020/08/18
Video vocabulary