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  • The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”

  • It's a common phrase, probably one you've heard many times before, and for a good reason.

  • We've all started a course of action that we thought would be beneficial for ourselves

  • or the people around us, but ended up blowing up in our faces.

  • Thankfully, for many of us, these actions probably didn't cause millions of deaths.

  • The same cannot be said for the five men we're discussing todayeach of which wanted

  • to do some kind of good for the world, but ended up making it a worse place for everyone

  • in it.

  • These men have a collective body count well into the tens of millions, but you might be

  • surprised to find out how they got there.

  • First up, we've got

  • 5.

  • Alfred NobelThe Father of Dynamite If you feel like that name rings a bell, don't

  • worry, we'll get to that.

  • Alfred Nobel was a Swedish Chemist whose scientific discovery helped define the nineteenth century

  • at least in terms of how they blew stuff up.

  • Before Nobel came along, gunpowder was the world's explosive compound of choice, and

  • had been for several hundred years.

  • But here's the problem: Gunpowder was old hat, and while it was a stable chemical compound,

  • for everything from warfare to industrial applications, the world needed something that

  • could pack way more of a punch.

  • That's where the miracle of nitroglycerin came along – a significantly more powerful

  • explosive concoction.

  • Here's the big problem, though: Unlike gunpowder, nitroglycerin wasn't stable in the slightest,

  • and was the frequent cause of deadly, explosive accidents.

  • Few people knew this better than Alfred Nobel, whose brother Emil was killed in a nitroglycerin

  • explosion at one of his father's factories.

  • This motivated Alfred to direct his intelligence and energies towards a noble goal: Creating

  • a new compound that could pack the explosive punch of nitroglycerin, but had the stability

  • of gunpowder, preventing accidents like the one that killed his brother from ever happening

  • again.

  • But, from the title of this video, you know this story doesn't have a happy ending.

  • In 1867, Alfred happened upon diatomaceous earth, a porous sedimentary rock that had

  • an extremely interesting property: It could absorb nitroglycerin.

  • While the resulting compound was still terrifyingly explosive, it was stable, making it the wonder-bomb

  • that the warmongers and industrialists of the world needed.

  • Nobel, ecstatic with his new creation, decided to give it the namedynamite” – derived

  • from the Greek word dynamis, literally meaningpower.”

  • But Alfred, being a perfectionist, didn't stop there.

  • As the years progressed and dynamite became a household name, he created an even more

  • powerful and deadly version in 1875 – by mixing nitroglycerin and nitrocellulose.

  • Dynamite would later become synonymous with cowboys and prospectors, but perhaps its most

  • iconic usage was in war, where it was used to blow countless people into kingdom come.

  • Alfred had wanted to create an invention that would prevent unnecessary deaths, like his

  • brother's, and had instead created a tool of mass murder.

  • The man became so synonymous with facilitating violence in his time that, when he was mistakenly

  • declared dead, the headline of his obituary readThe Merchant of Death Is Dead.”

  • Okay, we weren't actually being totally honest with you earlier: This story does kind

  • of have a happy ending.

  • Alfred Nobel was deeply affected by his premature obituary, realising that his legacy was violence

  • and warfare.

  • This inspired him to use his blood-money to found the Nobel Prize, which intended to reward

  • the best of humanity rather than commemorating the worst.

  • Sadly for a lot of people, the next entry on this list wasn't quite as philanthropic

  • with his wealth

  • 4.

  • Henry FordHitler's Role Model If ever you've been on the open road in

  • your life, you've seen a Ford.

  • From the Model T to the Mustang, Ford is one of the most iconic automotive brands in American

  • history.

  • Statistically, a lot of the car owners watching this video probably own or have owned a Ford

  • car at some point in their adult life.

  • They're just that common.

  • The Ford Motor Company had a major role in building up the automotive industry in the

  • United States, massively bolstering the American economy and providing millions of jobs to

  • hard-working Americans for over a hundred years.

  • Born to humble beginnings on a farm in 1863, Henry Ford pursued a career in business and

  • engineering, allowing him to found the Ford Motor Company in 1903.

  • After five years of research and development, they produced and released the iconic Model

  • T, which rocked the automotive world and helped bring vehicles like this to the masseswith

  • standardised parts and assembly line innovations allowing them to be built far cheaper than

  • other cars on the market, without sacrificing quality.

  • He was also a magnanimous boss, paying employees $5 a daywhich was seen as insanely generous

  • back in 1914.

  • So, you're probably wondering: This is the good side of this iconic American industrialist,

  • but where does the evil come in?

  • Well, a famous slogan for the Model T was that you could have it in any colour you like,

  • as long as it's black.

  • Henry Ford didn't extend this same attitude towards people, though, as he was an avowed

  • racist and Anti-Semite.

  • That's righteven for the early 20th century's standards, Henry Ford was considered

  • a massive bigot.

  • There wasn't an antisemitic conspiracy theory he didn't buy into, and he was a vocal proponent

  • of the American Eugenics Movement that was picking up steam at the time.

  • Holding these views would be problematic in its own right, but it strays into deadly territory

  • when you meet Ford's biggest fan: Adolf Hitler.

  • Hitler found Ford's insane levels of bigotry inspirational, to the point where he quoted

  • them in his infamous book, Mein Kampf.

  • Having this powerful, beloved American icon on his side helped offer the budding genocidal

  • dictator a sense of international legitimacy, and some sources report that Hitler was interested

  • in helping Ford to become, in his own words, “the leader of the growing Fascist movement

  • in America.”

  • Ford's wilful spreading of antisemitic propaganda helped lay the groundwork for the Nazi atrocities

  • that were to follow.

  • 3.

  • Winston ChurchillScourge of India From Nazis, to one of the world's most famous

  • and cherished Nazi-fighters: The bulldog-faced, cigar-chomping, iron-willed Winston Churchill

  • England's legendary prime minister during World War II, and one of the most well-known

  • faces of the allied forces.

  • When people think of Churchill, they think of his inspirational radio addresseslike

  • his famousWe will fight them on the beachesspeechand his razor-sharp wit.

  • Churchill was infinitely quotable, with nuggets of wisdom like "To improve is to change, so

  • to be perfect is to change oftenandCourage is rightly esteemed the first of human qualities

  • because it has been said, it is the quality which guarantees all others.”

  • Churchill saved England from the terrifying Nazis forces in its darkest hour, while the

  • country was being bombed and the Third Reich began to claim more and more of Europe on

  • its rampage to rule the Western World.

  • His part in orchestrating the legendary invasion of Normandy by Allied Forces, and liberating

  • France from their brutal Nazi occupiers, has earned him a permanent legacy as a hero to

  • many.

  • While he fell out of favour after the end of World War II, it's hard to find somebody

  • who'll tell you that Winston Churchill didn't help pull Great Britainand perhaps even

  • Western Europefrom one of their most dire struggles in modern history.

  • Unless, of course, you're in India.

  • While Churchill's goal of defeating the Nazis was undeniably a noble one, some of

  • his methods for securing that win helped facilitate the horrible ends of millions of innocent

  • lives.

  • To be more specific, the Bengal Famine of 1943 was a national tragedy that left over

  • three million Indians dead from starvation.

  • There were a number of factors believed to be involved in causing this famine: Drought,

  • crop infection, and Burmawhich was a major source of rice imports for the Indian

  • peoplefalling into the hands of the Japanese.

  • However, more recent evidence shows that Winston Churchill likely had a hand in causing this

  • tragedy.

  • Indian journalist Madhushree Mukerjee found compelling evidence that there would have

  • still been enough supplies to feed the Bengal region, were it not for the decisions of Winston

  • Churchill's wartime cabinet.

  • Because India was still under British colonial rule during the 1940s, they were still controlled

  • by the British governmentand, as a result, the British government had full control over

  • all their resources.

  • Churchill diverted so many of these resources to the allied war effort that he left over

  • three million Indians to starve.

  • And to add insult to injury, he blamed this mass starvation on the Indian people, attributing

  • the lack of resources in India to the fact that the Indian peoplein his own words

  • bred like rabbits.

  • Yikes.

  • 2.

  • Albert EinsteinUncle of the Atomic Bomb This is a man who is practically synonymous

  • with the very concept of science, and is up there with Isaac Newton, Nikola Tesla, and

  • Bill Nye on the list ofscientists who became household names.”

  • He made gravity waves with his general theory of relativity, his answer to the mystery of

  • the photoelectric effect, and his evidence for atomic theory.

  • His contributions to science were so great that he won the Nobel Prize for Physics in

  • 1921, and has inspired multiple generations of children to pursue knowledge for the betterment

  • of mankind.

  • Not too shabby for a bored former patent officer.

  • He did, however, make one terrible mistake that went on to cause hundreds of thousands

  • of deaths, and cause an ongoing threat to the continuation of modern civilisation even

  • today.

  • As World War II was reaching a fever pitch in 1939, Albert Einstein was signing his name

  • to one of the most dangerous letters in human history.

  • Despite being a pacifist, Einstein was one of the many experts who feared that Nazi Germany

  • was on course to develop the first atomic bomb.

  • As an exiled German Jew himself, Einstein knew that, if they obtained such a weapon,

  • there would be no mercy for anyone who dared to defy them.

  • In order to make sure that the allies weren't at a loss, the letter Einstein signed was

  • begging the US Government to hasten their own development of an atomic bomb, laying

  • the groundwork for the Manhattan Project that would later birth the bombs dropped on Hiroshima

  • and Nagasaki, killing hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians.

  • A quote often attributed to Einstein is, “I do not know with what weapons World War III

  • will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

  • And sadly, we have Albert Einstein partly to thank for that.

  • 1.

  • Gavrilo PrincipThe World's Deadliest Assassin

  • Perhaps the least well-known person on this list, Gavrilo Princip was a teenage assassin

  • with the best intentions who happened to kill over 37,000,000 people with one magazine of

  • handgun ammo.

  • This Bosnian-Serb nationalist fired the bullets that killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the

  • heir to the Austria-Hungarian throne.

  • Once again, to many modern Serbians, Princip's intentions were as pure and heroic as could

  • befreeing the Serbian people from the iron-fisted rule of the Austria-Hungarian

  • Empire and making a powerful statement about Serbian independence.

  • He and a gang of like-minded individuals orchestrated a seemingly doomed assassination plan against

  • the Archduke, that ended up putting Princip right in the path of his oncoming vehicle.

  • The skinny, 19-year-old Princip took his chance, and blasted Ferdinand with his pistol until

  • the Archduke was no more, standing his ground against his beloved country's tyrannical

  • rulers.

  • However, many credit the assassination of the Archduke as the match that ignited a powder

  • keg of European political tensions.

  • The result of this?

  • World War I, killing almost 40 million and committing a generation of young people the

  • world over to face horrific conditions in dehumanising trench warfare.

  • Literally millions of people dead from just a handful of bullets and the most idealistic

  • intentions, making Gavrilo Princip the deadliest assassin who ever lived.

  • If the people today have proven anything, it's that the purest intentions can still

  • lead to the most nightmarish resultssometimes due to malice, and other times, due to a simple

  • lack of foresight.

  • So, next time you have to make a major decision, try to think a few steps ahead.

  • Or, at the very least, try to keep in mind who you might be stepping on.

  • Check outShocking Study Reveals How Anyone Can Be EvilandThe Origin of Evil:

  • The Devilfor more fascinating meditations into the nature of all that is bad.

  • And in the meantime, be nice, it's really the least you can do.

The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”

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Most Evil Good Guys – Men Who Tried to Do Good But Killed Millions

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    Summer posted on 2020/08/15
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