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  • (bouncy music)

  • Katie Holmes: I'm really excited

  • to sit down with all these women.

  • It's always interesting to read about a person or have an idea of someone and then get to the bottom of how they became who they became.

  • Kim Hastreiter: I am sort of a cultural anthropologist.

  • I am an artist.

  • I do have a magazine also called "Paper."

  • Jane Rosenthal: I'm Jane Rosenthal

  • and I produce movies and television.

  • Katie: Just say your name and what you do.

  • Christine Barberich: My name is Christine

  • and I'm the editor and chief of Refinery29.

  • Jeanne Yang: My name is Jeanne Yang.

  • I am a stylist and a co-designer and co-partner of Holmes & Yang, a clothing line.

  • Cornelia: This is my mother Jill Abramson.

  • She is the executive editor of the "New York Times."

  • The first woman to hold that position, to be in that role.

  • Renee Robinson: My name is Renee Robinson.

  • and I am a dancer.

  • Katie: What shapes your identity first?

  • Being a woman, your career, or being a New Yorker?

  • Renee Robinson: It would probably be

  • being a woman.

  • Kim Hastreiter: I mean New York is really important to me,

  • I am a New Yorker, I love New York,

  • but also I think the thing that I live for

  • is inspiration.

  • Jill Abramson: I think probably being

  • a New Yorker has had the biggest influence on me.

  • Christine Barberich: Definitely my career.

  • I always wanted to be a writer and an editor,

  • you know, I never ever doubted that for a second.

  • I think it's just like who I am.

  • Jane Rosenthal: I think my daughters

  • shape me most.

  • Katie: Well they're lucky.

  • Renee Robinson: Female leaders.

  • Those were my examples.

  • In the dance business, you know,

  • there are a lot of male choreographers,

  • a lot of male artistic directors,

  • but I was surrounded by all these female leaders.

  • Katie: What would you say was one of the most difficult times for you

  • and how did you get over it and how did you

  • believe that led you to where you are now?

  • Kim Hastreiter: When I tried to do amazing things in these big magazines

  • they always fell flat because I would come

  • with an amazing idea and then it would

  • all go away and then it would come back unrecognizable to me so I was like

  • the only way to do it I have to do it myself,

  • so I said "we have to do a magazine."

  • Jill Abramson: When I was Washington bureau chief for "The Times"

  • the executive editor of "The Times"

  • at that point was kind of a

  • domineering strong personality editor

  • who I didn't get along with too well.

  • Jane O'Connor: He would offer Jill other jobs at

  • "The Times" and I was "yes, yes, take it, do that,

  • you'll be happy,"

  • and Jill "No, this is the job I want,

  • it's the job I deserve,

  • and I'm gonna just tough it out."

  • Katie: And how long did this go on?

  • Jill Abramson: For about 2 years,

  • it didn't go on and on.

  • Katie: That's long.

  • Jeanne Yang: I started working for a department store in their management training program

  • because I thought that was

  • the only thing you could really do in clothing.

  • I hated my job and I got laid off

  • and I was really upset about it

  • and my older brother pulled me aside and said

  • "have you ever thought of actually doing something

  • that you want to do, that you really like doing,

  • because things will come easier when

  • you really like doing what you're doing."

  • Jane Rosenthal: I will say that as

  • a working woman I was told that

  • I could do anything, be anything I wanted

  • and I actually believed that

  • and I believed that for so long

  • and it really wasn't until

  • the further along I got in my career

  • where I realized there would be times

  • I felt that I would be asked to be at

  • the table or part of a board or something more

  • because I was a woman

  • and not because I really had

  • the authority to be there.

  • Katie: What advice would you give

  • a young girl, you know, moving to

  • a big city right now who maybe

  • doesn't know what she's good at yet?

  • Kim Hastreiter: I know that everyone can't

  • do this, but I always say like

  • when kids want to go to graduate school,

  • they want to keep going to school,

  • I say instead of paying to go to school

  • just go and work somewhere for

  • a little or free and just work for

  • someone that you admire.

  • Jeanne Yang: When you are in the environment

  • of a workplace you can gain more knowledge

  • than sometimes in a classroom.

  • Jane Rosenthal: I certainly have learned more

  • by my failures than my successes

  • and I probably had more failures than successes.

  • Renee Robinson: If you continue to learn

  • about life outside of the dance studio,

  • outside of the dance world

  • the richer you are as a person

  • the more interesting you will be as a performer.

  • Katie: I feel that that is a wonderful

  • piece of advice for everyone of quite honestly

  • and one of the reasons that I wanted

  • to do this film was to inspire

  • that age group that might be searching

  • for what it is that they want to do

  • and I love what you're saying

  • because I was raised in the same way.

  • Christene Barberich: There's a lot of energy

  • a lot of, you know, sometimes nervous energy

  • and insecurity, you know, when you're young

  • and you're starting out and I think

  • that you have all these aspirations

  • and you have these high hopes about

  • what you want to do with your life

  • and sometimes it takes a little bit longer

  • than you think it's going to take.

  • Katie: How important are female relationships

  • to you in your life?

  • How do women support you?

  • How do you support them?

  • Jeanne Yang: I read a quote recently that said

  • "There's a special place in hell

  • for women who don't help each other out."

  • And I really truly believe that.

  • Renee Robinson: I love sharing information

  • with young people about how to investigate

  • what would be good for them

  • to get to their best

  • and each person will have to find

  • the specific details of what they will need

  • to make their journey its most sparkly

  • so that's why I say I enjoy sharing

  • what I have done in hopes that

  • it leads them to what will be best for them.

(bouncy music)

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Inspirational Women: Katie Holmes | In Short

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    Sofi posted on 2014/05/14
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