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  • Dodo do do dodo do.

  • Hey, what's that smell?

  • E, have you been cooking again?

  • Oh, no, he says it's fishy as well.

  • Hi, James from www.engvid.com . We're going to work on some animal idioms in a different

  • fashion.

  • What I mean by that is you've probably heard many idioms using animals.

  • The ones I want to use now is how we use them as adjectives to describe something, and why

  • are we doing this?

  • I've said before, when it comes to idioms, they are shorthand.

  • So, instead of saying five sentences, we can use two words, five words, or one sentence

  • to get across a meaning to someone.

  • Or, when someone says it, you go oh, I have it.

  • I've got it right away.

  • So, I want to teach you these ones because they're commonly used to describe people's

  • characteristics.

  • Okay?

  • So, I've got six of them on the board.

  • I will go over and explain what they mean.

  • Before I start, I'll do vocabulary, because how I will help you is by teaching you some

  • maybe foreign vocabulary, then we'll do a quiz to help you make sure we further your

  • understanding.

  • And I'm going to have - may have - I do have a bonus section for you.

  • Are you ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • So, Mr. E says "Something seems fishy", and that looks like a dead fish.

  • If you have a dead fish, you put it in a car at say, 30 degrees centigrade, leave it for

  • a day or two, it'll be fishy.

  • But before we get to "fishy", let's look at the other ones we have on the board.

  • But we'll start with our vocabulary.

  • Backstabber.

  • A backstabber is someone that, when your back is facing them, they take a knife and they

  • go "weeheh, weeheh, weeheh!"

  • Usually, a backstabber is somebody that looks innocent and you think you can trust, but

  • you cannot trust them.

  • They may even seem to be your friend, but they are not nice to their friends.

  • They're actually worse to their friends than they are to their enemies.

  • So, a backstabber is someone, when you turn your back, they stab you with a knife.

  • Untrustworthy.

  • The next word is "grudge".

  • When you have a grudge is to hold bad feelings against somebody for something they've done

  • in the past for a long time.

  • So, if someone did something to you three years ago and you hold a grudge, you don't

  • forget that.

  • You remember it and you still feel angry about it.

  • Okay?

  • So, those are two key words we're going to use for the vocabulary to work on our adjectives

  • here.

  • Sheepish.

  • Baah!

  • Baah!

  • Sheep are lovely animals.

  • They're fluffy, they feel nice when you touch them.

  • They're a little bit shy and nervous.

  • If somebody is sheepish, it means shy, nervous, or no confidence.

  • So, if someone had a sheepish smile, it'd be like - not really a smile.

  • Barely a smile, because they have no confidence to really smile or they're a little bit shy,

  • okay?

  • The next one, chicken.

  • The world's most favorite meat.

  • I'm sorry.

  • Anyway.

  • I'm a little hungry.

  • When someone is chicken, we have two ways of saying it.

  • "You are a chicken", or "You are chicken".

  • You might say, "That's the same".

  • No.

  • If you are a chicken, it means you are afraid of many things.

  • Everything makes you afraid, because that's what "chicken" means, afraid.

  • When someone says, "You're chicken", it means in this situation, you are afraid.

  • So, if I said, "Do you want to jump off a tall building?"

  • "No, that's crazy!"

  • You might go, "Chicken!".

  • I go, "Yep, I'm a chicken, because this is not smart, it's dangerous, I'm afraid of it."

  • But if you're a chicken, everything scares you.

  • I heard a noise, that scared me, you're a chicken.

  • People push you, you're a chicken.

  • Traffic scares you, everything scares you, you're a chicken.

  • So, it's a little different how we use it.

  • If someone says, "You're a chicken", it means you're afraid of many things.

  • If they say, "You're chicken", you're afraid of that particular situation.

  • It's a small difference, but it's a difference.

  • Number three: pig.

  • A pig is an animal, "Oink, oink, oink", that likes to be in the mud.

  • Mud is earth and water mixed together, and it's dirty.

  • It likes to roll around.

  • It's a happy animal, but it's also a dirty animal.

  • In fact, in some cultures, they don't eat pig or pork because they think pigs are dirty.

  • When we use the word "pig" in English, we can use it for some slang as well as a basic

  • meaning.

  • One meaning means unpleasant.

  • Remember I said earth and water mixed together and the pigs play in it?

  • Well, it's kind of dirty.

  • It's unpleasant.

  • We don't like to get dirty, so we don't like to be like pigs.

  • If someone doesn't wash themselves regularly, or here's something else that seems strange

  • but it's true.

  • If they use bad language, if they're always saying the f-word or the s-word or saying

  • bad things about people, they are unpleasant to be around and we call them a pig.

  • Sometimes, especially, women will call a man a pig if he talks about a woman's body and

  • other things.

  • Greedy.

  • Another thing for "pig" means you like to eat a lot, or you take more than your share.

  • If Daniel and I have a pizza and, on the pizza, there are ten slices, big pizza.

  • And I eat eight and Daniel eats two, I'm a pig.

  • Because he should have five, but I took most of it.

  • I'm a pig.

  • I'm probably unpleasant to be around as well.

  • Anyway.

  • And in North America, "Bad boys, whatcha gonna do, whatcha gonna do when the police come

  • for you?"

  • Don't call a police officer a pig.

  • Just letting you know that.

  • It's slang, but sometimes you'll hear people in North America, when they're upset with

  • the police because maybe they stopped them in their car and gave them a ticket, they'll

  • go "Pig!"

  • But they will never say it to the police officer's face.

  • I don't suggest you do, but if you're watching "Bad Boys" with Will Smith, or you're watching

  • other movies and you hear people say, "The pigs are coming!"

  • They're usually not talking about "oink, oink", they're talking about the actual police.

  • Okay?

  • Good to know.

  • Snake.

  • "Hssss."

  • I had his liver with some fava beans... sorry, bad joke.

  • But a snake - the Native Americans, Indigenous people from North America, used to say that

  • people speak with forked tongue.

  • Forked tongue means you could not trust it, because the tongue went this way and this

  • way.

  • It said two things at the same time.

  • A snake is untrustworthy.

  • Snakes, as you know, are in the grass.

  • You never know where they are and when they're going to bite you or strike you.

  • So, we say "Snake in the grass" to say you can't trust them.

  • If a person is a snake, they are untrustworthy.

  • They are also - do you remember backstabbers?

  • They're the ones who seem friendly to you - remember forked tongue - "I'm your friend"

  • and then behind your back, "I'm going to kill you!"

  • If someone is a snake, they are a backstabber or they are untrustworthy.

  • By the way, this is not Mr. E, before you get confused.

  • That's Mr. E, this is a snake, very different.

  • Number five: fishy.

  • Remember Mr. E says, "That seems fishy to me"?

  • When a fish is dead and been out of water for a long time, it tends to smell.

  • And if there were a fish in this room that would have been here for five days, I may

  • not know where it is but it would make me suspicious that there's a dead animal or fish

  • in here.

  • It would make me want to know - something's wrong and I need to find it, because it smells

  • very bad.

  • When people say somebody is fishy or something is fishy or a situation, it means something

  • is wrong.

  • I have a doubt or a suspicion, and I want to know what is wrong, because I can feel

  • there's something wrong, because something smells.

  • Something smells wrong.

  • Now, let's look at "beef".

  • Beef, mmm.

  • Barbeque.

  • Anyway.

  • So, when we look at beef, it's quite interesting, because a lot of people have - well, beef

  • used to be a very popular word to describe a situation with someone else.

  • And then it fell out of fashion, but we brought it back again, or people brought it back with

  • modern rap music or urban music.

  • If you look at movies in the 1930s, if you had a beef with somebody, it meant to have

  • a problem.

  • So, if you said I had a problem with you, I have a beef with you, it means I have a

  • problem that I - yeah, problem.

  • Yet, when we look at modern - the modern use of beef, they talk about beefing with somebody.

  • That's a lot of rap music or urban music.

  • They talk about beefing, but people still do use it on a casual sense, like "Do you

  • have a beef with me?"

  • Do you have a problem?

  • Now, now that we've got all six of these done, I would like to take a quick quiz to test

  • your knowledge.

  • Are you ready?

  • And we are now ready to do the quiz.

  • Let's see how well you learned those phrases - sorry, those words we used with animals.

  • The first one we're going to do is: I have had a beef with that guy from the first day

  • I met him.

  • Your two options are: problem or good relationship.

  • I'll give you a second or two to think about which is the correct answer.

  • Did you say the correct answer is "problem"?

  • You are correct.

  • You can actually put the word in there: I have had a problem with that guy from the

  • first day I met him.

  • We talked about beef being an old word used in the 50s and 60s or 30s and 50s.

  • And now, people are using it in urban music and rap, saying "beefing" with someone.

  • Number two: A lot of people think that Moe is a snake.

  • Which one would that be?

  • Very trustworthy or untrustworthy?

  • Correct.

  • You could actually put: A lot of people think that Moe is untrustworthy, and replace "snake"

  • with that one, "a snake".

  • So "untrustworthy" is it.

  • Let's look at number three now.

  • What do you think the answer for this sentence would be?

  • "You are such a pig looking at women that way!"

  • Would it be police officer, caring, or rude?

  • Okay.

  • Well, the answer is "rude", which I'm sure you know, because rude is another word for

  • unpleasant.

  • In this case, we cannot substitute "rude" for "pig", it's more the meaning of what someone

  • is saying than an actual substitution.

  • And now, we'll do number four, the final one: There is something fishy about the way Frank

  • was acting the other day.

  • Well, it's true, fish live in water which is usually cold.

  • It's not "cool", but remember we talked about being fishy is suspicious, because something

  • smells funny.

  • So, "suspicious" is the correct answer, as "rude" is in number three.

  • Now, for the bonus, because you stuck around with me this long, I think you deserve it.

  • Here are three other words, but before I continue, I'd like you to pay attention to something.

  • The words "fishy", "snake", "beef", and the other one, "sheepish", they tend to be negative

  • in characterizing people or situations.

  • So, where you would use this is when you want to describe a person or a thing in a negative

  • way for most of these ones.

  • Okay?

  • Now, I'll do the next three and you'll notice it takes - we go further on the negative zone.

  • It wasn't my idea, but it seems when we humans look at animals, we tend to look at negative

  • things about them and put them or project them onto other people.

  • So, the word "sluggish".

  • Sluggish means slow, because there is this animal that moves very slowly.

  • And for some of you, this the first time I have spoken slowly in any videos.

  • So, a slug moves slowly.

  • And, for many people, they feel sluggish unless they have a coffee in the morning, right?

  • Or they wake up tired and go "Oh, I'm sluggish today.

  • I'm very tired."

  • Asinine.

  • Asinine comes from ass, and that's that - my Spanish friends would say "culo", I think.

  • Yes.

  • But, that's not it.

  • It comes from "donkey", burro, the donkey.

  • Because people think donkeys aren't very smart.

  • So, when somebody says you made an asinine comment, they mean a stupid comment, because

  • it's like a donkey would say.

  • It's not intelligent.

  • Sorry, donkeys.

  • I think you're cute.

  • And finally, squirrely.

  • This is going to be really hard to explain to you, because a squirrel is basically a

  • rat that looks really cute.

  • In Canada, in the parks, we have them and people think they're absolutely beautiful