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  • Batman slowly turned over, and he saw his arch-villain or arch-nemesis, the Joker.

  • Hey.

  • Sorry.

  • James from engVid.

  • Just reading about the Batman.

  • And Batman is famous for having his utility belt and tools to solve crimes.

  • I'm going to use this shoe to teach you some vocabulary and some idioms.

  • You guys ready?

  • Or and some phrases.

  • You ready?

  • Let's go.

  • Use this shoe.

  • "Wa-cha."

  • All right, so Mr. E says: "I'm a shoo-in for this job."

  • What the heck does he mean?

  • He's actually wearing a nice pair of shoes, so it must be something serious.

  • Let's go to the board and find out.

  • Hmm.

  • Here is a shoe, and you may notice in brown I have put one, two, three, four things about

  • a shoe you may not know.

  • I know you know what a shoe is-right?-basically, but did you know that these things here, we

  • call them "laces"?

  • Yeah, that's what you tie up.

  • Someone will say: "Do up your laces."

  • But there's also an idiom that comes from this.

  • Now, what do you call the back of the shoe?

  • We call that "the heel".

  • Right?

  • The heel of the shoe.

  • Now, this part you can't really see, but it's the part that bends like this, we call that

  • "the arch".

  • That's where your foot kind of goes like this.

  • And then finally, this is "the sole".

  • Now, I'm not talking about the soul that goes to Heaven.

  • Right?

  • I'm not talking about the soul that goes to Heaven, I'm talking about the sole of your foot.

  • So, it's heel, arch which is the middle part, and then the sole, and we've got our laces,

  • and now we're ready to do our lesson.

  • Let's go.

  • So, let's start with the shoe itself, the whole shoe and nothing but the shoe.

  • The first one I want to talk to you about is about a "goody two-shoes".

  • Now, if you're a goody two-shoes, it means you're a good, good person.

  • You know, the person who does all their homework, comes on time, is very nice to everybody.

  • You might be religious even, I don't know, but you're a really, really, really good person.

  • You don't smoke, you don't drink.

  • I know, if you're an engVid watcher, that's not you.

  • Okay?

  • Because you're on the internet, so I don't know what you're up to.

  • But a goody two-shoes only does good things, never does bad things; no bad words, no alcohol,

  • no anything that's bad.

  • Goody two-shoes are usually children.

  • Okay?

  • The next one I want to talk to you about with the shoe is "a shoo-in".

  • And notice I said: "shoo-in".

  • It looks like the word "shoe" here, but it's spelt differently, which might be a bit confusing.

  • Well, that's because when we as English people say it, we don't really think of this particular

  • verb, but we use the word, and when we use it we mean...

  • If someone's a shoo-in, and usually for a job or a situation...

  • He's a shoo-in for...

  • To be her girl...

  • Boyfriend.

  • She is a shoo-in for the job.

  • When we say it what we mean is they are the person candidate or the perfect person to

  • get it.

  • Okay?

  • So, if you're going for a job, and let's say you're a lady and you're going for a job,

  • and go: "She's a shoo-in for the job.

  • She's got the right education, she has the right connections, she has the right experience."

  • We mean you're the perfect one for the job.

  • Now, remember I said it looks like this, but it's not like that?

  • I've got to give you the real meaning behind it.

  • See, this "shoo-in" comes from horseracing.

  • You know horses?

  • Well, way back what would happen is horses would be racing and then one horse was...

  • That was winning would kind of go back and fall back, and the second horse would win,

  • and it would become the winner, and it was called the shoo-in.

  • "Well, why?" you're thinking: "That's like perfect candidate, right?"

  • Not exactly.

  • This is in what we call the fixed race.

  • It means that the first person in the race...

  • So let me get you some markers so you can see the difference.

  • This horse was winning, but it was cheating.

  • Then it would stop and slow down to let the other horse win, that way people would make

  • money on this horse.

  • Boo.

  • Bah.

  • Yes, but this would still get the job and win.

  • So, over time we took the idea from horseracing: "shoo-in", the person who would win and then

  • we'd say: "Whoever gets the job, or the girl, or whatever is a shoo-in" because they were

  • guaranteed to win, just like this one would let it win, that's where "shoo-in" comes from.

  • Yeah.

  • Sometimes it's better not to know the history of things.

  • But now you can impress your friends because when they say: "You're a shoo-in", you can

  • say: "Do you know what 'shoo-in', where it comes from and what it really means?

  • Are you trying to say I'm cheating for this job?"

  • All right, see?

  • There.

  • It's nice to know.

  • Okay, so that's "shoo-in", but it will be pronounced like this.

  • And in modern times if someone says: "You're a shoo-in for this job", what they're trying

  • to tell you is: "Hey, it's yours.

  • You've got everything that is necessary to get it."

  • Cool?

  • All right.

  • Next, let's move to the laces.

  • Remember the laces?

  • These funny things, laces?

  • Sometimes they look like string.

  • All right?

  • So sometimes we say: "string".

  • Different laces look different.

  • These ones are laces.

  • If they're really, really tiny and look like string, you might call them "shoe string".

  • Similar, but now you know.

  • So let's go and look at these.

  • Now, I've got a couple.

  • When it looks like a string, we say: "shoestring budget".

  • What's a shoestring budget?

  • Well, a string is really, really, really small and fine.

  • Ah, you know what?

  • This is like a string.

  • See how small this is?

  • This could be like a shoe string.

  • Hopefully you can see that.

  • If you can see that, it's so small it means there's nothing to it, there's not very much.

  • There's nothing much to it.

  • So when we say: "You're on a shoestring budget" it means you don't have a lot of money.

  • All right?

  • You want to go shopping, but you only have, if you're in America, 10...

  • America or Canada, you have $5.

  • You can't buy very much with it, so you go: "I'm on a shoestring budget."

  • Or if you wanted to go to a movie or you wanted to go on vacation, you say: "I have $300."

  • Well, that's a shoestring budget, not very much, so I have to be careful with my money.

  • How about laces?

  • Well, when I showed you the lace, which is different, if somebody "laces into you", it

  • means: "Boom", like attacked you.

  • What?

  • Yeah, man, I was walking on the street and I saw this one guy lace into another guy.

  • "Boom, boomday, boomday."

  • It means hit him.

  • Hit him, hit him hard.

  • "Lace into" means to attack.

  • So, if somebody laced into me, for instance: "The boss laced into me about my project",

  • it means attacked in a negative way.

  • He might have said: "That wasn't good.

  • This wasn't good.

  • I don't know why you did this.

  • Bah-bah-bah-bah- -bah-bah-bah-bah".

  • "Lace into somebody", okay?

  • So: "The boss laced into him".

  • "Lace up", that's a funny one.

  • See my shoes?

  • "Lace them up" means put the laces in the shoes.

  • And if you lace them up, then...

  • Lace them up and tie them.

  • Usually you hear this one more in boxing, when they say: "Lace up the gloves", it means

  • put these things in the gloves and then tie it so you can fight.

  • Sometimes your trainer has to lace up your gloves.

  • Okay?

  • So now we've done "shoe" and "lace".

  • Let's go to the bottom of the foot, the sole of the foot.

  • That's the bottom, the sole of the foot.

  • In this case, "sole" is one big thing.

  • In the church they talk about the soul, and the soul is the part...

  • You, it's essentially you, one thing.

  • And when we talk about the sole of a shoe, we mean it's one thing.

  • So, "sole" in this case means one thing.

  • "Sole purpose" means it only has one...

  • One job it can do.

  • "Your sole purpose here is to make me happy", that means your only job here is to make me

  • happy.

  • "Mr. E is the sole authority on cameras."

  • It means Mr. E is the only one who knows about cameras.

  • Not only one, knows the most and can tell everybody about it.

  • So, if you're the sole authority, you're numero uno, you're the one person that everybody

  • goes to because everybody knows you know, you're the authority.

  • "Sole survivor", oo, this is not a good one.

  • But if an airplane crashes somewhere, what that means if you're the sole survivor - everybody

  • died but you.

  • You're the only one alive.

  • If you work in a company, and they fire...

  • They get rid of...

  • "You're fired!"

  • Okay.

  • "You're fired, you're fired!"

  • Does that remind you of anybody?

  • "You're fired, and she's fired!"

  • Right?

  • Like on The Apprentice, and you're the sole survivor, you're the only one left after everyone's

  • fired.

  • Okay?

  • Now, do you remember the arch?

  • We talked about the arch.

  • Now, I want to talk to you about the arch because the "arch" or "ark" some people will

  • say, the arch is in a structure.

  • They found this in Rome, that if you put a little kind of half circle, it can support

  • a lot of weight.

  • So they have an arch support in your shoe so you can stand and be strong.

  • Okay?

  • It's usually inside the shoe.

  • You'll notice this word: "arch" is in "architecture", which is in buildings because they take the

  • idea of arch support, which is design, and they put in architecture.

  • All right?

  • Cool, right?

  • So it's design.

  • Design.

  • Now, I put "arch-villain" here, and when I did that I put two of these things to explain

  • to you.

  • "Arch" also means mischievous or cunning, which could be very bad.

  • A cunning person is a clever or smart person, but in not a nice way.

  • And "mischievous" means someone who acts in a little bit of a bad way.

  • Right?

  • So, if you put "mischievous" and "bad" with "arch", it has another meaning which means

  • chief or first, when you get something like the word "arch-villain"... Batman's arch-villain

  • is the Joker.

  • He's his first villain, number one villain, and he is smart and he is bad.

  • Arch-villain.

  • You'll see "arch" before a lot of things for that very reason, because they're either trying

  • to tell you it's first or it's bad.

  • Now, you can also talk about "arch" as being old.

  • Right?

  • But that's another thing we'll go into another time.

  • But here I want to show you this one: "arch" is first and chief, and that's why we have

  • "monarch".

  • A monarch is a king or a queen.

  • "Mono" meaning one and "arch" meaning first.

  • So, one leader, "monarch".

  • Cool, huh?

  • Now you're learning about history as well as vocabulary.

  • And finally I want to touch on the back part of the shoe, the heel.

  • That's the back part of your foot as well.

  • Right?

  • So, the arch is part of your foot as well as a shoe, and the heel is the back part of

  • your foot.

  • "Achilles' heel", that's right around here.

  • An Achilles' heel is a weakness.

  • If you have an Achilles' wheel...

  • Heel, it's something that makes you weak.

  • Example: My Achilles' heel is chocolate.

  • Anybody who knows me knows I love chocolate.

  • I told you, anybody who knows me.

  • See?

  • That came from nowhere, like magic.

  • I love chocolate, I'm sorry.

  • That's my Achilles' heel.

  • "Bring someone to heel".