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  • Today you're transforming your spoken English

  • by setting the scene for the movie

  • Mission Impossible Fallout with me.

  • We can't get enough of Tom Cruise, can we?

  • He was in our first video in the series

  • Top Gun: Maverick as well.

  • When you study the scene,

  • the way we're going to in this video,

  • you'll be able to understand American movies and TV

  • effortlessly without subtitles.

  • The best part is,

  • not only do you get to learn and study with the video,

  • you get to train with the training section in this video,

  • so you can start to make all of these reductions

  • and so on a habit.

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • We're going to be doing this all summer,

  • June through August.

  • Stick with me every Tuesday.

  • They're all great scenes,

  • and there's going to be so much to learn

  • that can transform the way you speak and understand English.

  • And as always, if you like this video

  • or you learn something,

  • please like and subscribe with notifications.

  • (whistling)

  • You're going to watch the clip,

  • then we're going to do a full

  • pronunciation analysis together.

  • This is going to help so much

  • with your listening comprehension

  • when it comes to watching english movies and TV.

  • But there's going to be a training section.

  • You're going to take what you've just learned

  • and practice repeating it,

  • doing a reduction, flapping a t,

  • just like you learned in the analysis.

  • Okay, here's the scene.

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • She didn't say.

  • She did however, grant me the opportunity to bring you in

  • on the condition that I terminate this mission

  • and hand over Solomon Lane personally.

  • Sir you can't do that.

  • Hunt.

  • No I know lane, and he has no intention of going back.

  • That's why we're taking him back.

  • Which means that's exactly what he wants us to do.

  • And now the analysis.

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • And where, we have a little stress there

  • on our question word.

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • I would say these two words have more of a scoop up

  • because the intonation is going up.

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • This is not a yes, no question.

  • And yes, no questions tend to go up in pitch.

  • And other questions tend to go down.

  • But in this particular case,

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • He's making it go up.

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • And where did this Sloane get this information?

  • What about the word and?

  • Does he say and?

  • And where--

  • And where-

  • Definitely no D.

  • The word sounds kind of like 'in' doesn't it?

  • and where, and where, and where

  • and where did Sloane get this?

  • And where--

  • And where did you get this information?

  • Get this, a stop T here it's not released.

  • That would be get this, gets this,

  • but it's get this, get this, get this, get

  • stopping the air in my throat,

  • my tongue is actually in position for the th,

  • get this and then when I'm ready to release

  • my tongue is already there.

  • Get this--

  • And everything is very smooth isn't it?

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • And where did Sloan get this information?

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • No skips in pitch, all smooth.

  • In-for-may-tion,

  • four syllable word with third syllable stress.

  • T-I-O-N ending here, is

  • S-H schwa and Shin Shin.

  • And where did Sloane get this information?

  • This infer ending S links right into the I.

  • So it's almost as if this word is

  • 'sinformation', 'sinformation'.

  • That's what linking does 'sinformation'?

  • Sinformation?--

  • Sloane and be careful there,

  • that's O diphthong as in no followed by N.

  • O O, make sure you do round your lips a little bit for that. Oww.

  • If you don't make that rounding motion,

  • it probably won't sound right, Sloane.

  • And then the tongue lifts for the N.

  • But before that we really want the O diphthong

  • to not have any nasal quality.

  • 'Sloa' O.

  • We don't want that. The N comes separately.

  • The nasal consonant is totally separate from the diphthong.

  • 'Sloa', 'Sloa'.

  • It's just like this word, slow.

  • And then you say an N.

  • Slow, Slow, Sloane, Sloane.

  • Sloane--

  • Get this information?

  • She didn't say.

  • She didn't, didn't,

  • she didn't say.

  • Most of our stress on the word say,

  • his pitch is a little bit high here,

  • she didn't say, she didn't say.

  • They're in a tunnel,

  • he's trying to be very clearly understood.

  • She didn't say.

  • She didn't say.

  • She didn't say.

  • She didn't say.

  • It's a little bit higher than conversational pitch,

  • I would say, in conversation,

  • it would probably be more like, "She didn't say,

  • "she didn't say,"

  • but instead it's, "She didn't say."

  • She didn't say--

  • What's happening with our N apostrophe T contraction here?

  • She didn't say,--

  • She didn't say, she didn't say,

  • I'm hearing very quick D, I'm definitely hearing the N.

  • I think the T is dropped.

  • I'm hearing the N going right into the S.

  • She didn't say, 'didn s',

  • 'didn s', 'didn say',

  • no feeling of a stop there.

  • She didn't say.

  • She didn't say.

  • Now the whole time we're hearing this phrase,

  • we're seeing this guy.

  • He looks pretty guilty.

  • I think it might have been him.

  • She didn't say, she did, however--

  • She did, she did, she did however,

  • a little break before the word however,

  • and after the word however,

  • just separating it a little bit

  • from the rest of the sentence

  • making it its own little thought group.

  • She did, she did, she did, she did.

  • She did, --

  • Did more stress there,

  • the D is not released that would be did, did. D,d,d.

  • She did, she did.

  • Tongue goes into position for the D,

  • the vocal cords vibrate, but it's not released.

  • She did, She did, She did, however,

  • She did however,

  • she did however,

  • she did however--

  • However,

  • how-ever middle syllable stress there,

  • however,

  • However, --

  • grant me the opportunity

  • to bring you in on the condition

  • that I terminate this mission.

  • Then we have a pretty long thought group,

  • Grant me the opportunity to bring you in on the condition

  • that I terminate this mission.

  • Grant me the opportunity to bring you in on the condition

  • that I terminate this mission.

  • Grant me the opportunity to bring you in on the condition

  • that I terminate this mission.

  • Let's just look at the first part of this thought group.

  • Grant me the opportunity,

  • Grant me the opportunity.

  • So he stresses me quite a bit.

  • Grant me,

  • Grant me, now here NT ending it was dropped earlier,

  • but here I'm hearing it as a stop.

  • Grant me, Grant, Grant, Grant me.

  • Grant me,--

  • Without a stop, it would sound like this,

  • "Gran me, Gran me."

  • I definitely don't hear that.

  • I definitely hear a little stop a little lift

  • to my ears that makes a T sound.

  • Native speakers here these little stops as

  • T's or P's or K's depending on the word.

  • Grant me, Grant me, grant me the opportunity.

  • Grant me the opportunity.

  • Grant me the opportunity.

  • Grant me the opportunity.

  • Me with the E vowel and then the word V with the E vowel.

  • Now the word 'The' can either be the with E

  • or it can be the with the schwa.

  • The rule is when the next word begins

  • with a vowel or diphthong,

  • this pronunciation is E.

  • However, I've noticed Americans don't

  • actually follow that rule all that much,

  • though he is here.

  • The opportunity.

  • Opportu--

  • Grant me the opportunity.

  • Grant me the opportunity.

  • Grant me the opportunity.

  • Stress on the third syllable of this five syllable word,

  • opportunity, opportunity.

  • As you practice that word, practice it right now, and

  • really feel that middle syllable stress.

  • Tadadadada, like the whole word goes up to that

  • and then comes away from that.

  • Opportunity, opportunity.

  • Opportunity,

  • If you make that your focus doesn't let you

  • simplify the rest of the word.

  • Maybe you also notice the T pronunciations,

  • we have a true T here starting the stressed syllable.

  • Opportunity,

  • then we have a Flap T,

  • because it's not starting a stress syllable

  • and it comes between two vowel or diphthong sounds.

  • Opportunity, opportunity.

  • Opportunity--

  • to bring you in.

  • Opportunity to bring you in,

  • Uhuh. bring you in.

  • You and to unstressed, bring and in stressed

  • with that shape Ah.

  • Now how is the word to pronounced?

  • Lets listen to opportunity to bring.

  • Opportunity to bring,

  • opportunity to bring.

  • Opportunity to,

  • opportunity to.

  • It's a flap isn't it?

  • It's a flap in the schwa.

  • It's not to it's a 'da' 'da' 'da'.

  • Opportunity 'da'.

  • Try that word just linking on to the word before.

  • Opportunity 'da', opportunity 'da'.

  • Opportunity to,

  • Opportunity to bring you in.

  • The opportunity to bring you in,

  • the opportunity to bring you in,

  • Opportunity to bring you in on the condition--

  • Bring you in on the condition--

  • Our next stress syllable is 'di' condition.

  • T-I-O-N here, SH scwha N.

  • Condition, our stressed