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  • Hi, welcome to www.engvid.com , I'm Adam.

  • In today's video, I'm going to continue looking at parts of speech, in particular I'm going

  • to look at verbs and adverbs.

  • Now, for those of you who watch regularly, there's also a video, you know, about nouns

  • and adjectives, and there's a link in the description box below.

  • There will be another video about articles, conjunctions, prepositions, etc.

  • So today, we're looking at the different types of verbs and adverbs.

  • What do adverbs do?

  • So, it's very important to understand how each of these verbs works, and again, there're

  • different videos for all - for each of these, but know the types so that you can recognize

  • them in a sentence.

  • Again, remember the parts of speech are the categories that every word in a sentence belongs

  • to, and recognizing each word will help you understand how to analyze a sentence for meaning,

  • for composition, for all kinds of things, and how to write sentences as well.

  • So, again, technically, this is for beginners, but intermediate and advanced students -- a

  • lot for you to gain from this as well.

  • So, the types of verbs.

  • We have the "be" verb.

  • Am, is, are, was, were, will be, right?

  • So, these are the "be" verbs, these talk about a state or a situation, okay, of something

  • happening.

  • There's no action, there's just state, okay?

  • What is the situation of the context we're talking about?

  • It's very important and probably the most used verb of all the verbs.

  • Then you have your active verbs.

  • For example, you have play, or you have give, so you're giving something or you're playing

  • tennis, etc.

  • These are actives.

  • These can be written in a passive form, okay, so "was played", or "is played", tennis was

  • played by all the kids, okay?

  • So, again, not the best sentence, but that's the verb.

  • Active or passive verbs, where something is actually happening, there's an action, and

  • it's very important to realize that action verbs come in transitive or intransitive form.

  • Sometimes, ambitransitive means they can be transitive or intransitive, depends on how

  • they are used.

  • A transitive verb must take an object, okay?

  • A transitive verb must take an object, so for example, "want", okay?

  • Want is actually not an active verb, but it's a transitive verb, and a transitive verb must

  • take the object, so you always want something.

  • You want what?

  • Candy.

  • You want what?

  • To play, okay?

  • So "want" always takes an object.

  • Intransitive does not take an object, okay?

  • So, for example, "go".

  • Go where?

  • Where does not work as an object, it works as an adverb.

  • So "go" will never have an object, it will have an adverbial compliment which is a different

  • lesson altogether.

  • If you want to understand how these things work, I have a video about the sentence structures,

  • what is a sentence in English?

  • You can get some more information there as well.

  • So active - passive.

  • Now, there's something called a state verb.

  • So, for example, "believe", or "understand", or "know", or "think", okay?

  • Here, we use these "like" action verbs in terms of construction, okay?

  • But there is no action.

  • When you say "I believe you are correct.", "believe", I'm not doing anything.

  • It's just in my head - correct, that's it, right?

  • So, there's no action.

  • And state verbs, we never use in the "-ing" form.

  • Never use them in a continuous form.

  • That's the main thing to remember about state verbs.

  • Then you have linking and copula verbs.

  • So, for example, seem.

  • "He seems happy.", okay?

  • There's no action here.

  • There's no movement.

  • Nothing is actually happening in this sentence, it's just describing a situation, and it's

  • very similar to a "be" verb.

  • It's a situation.

  • He seems happy.

  • Maybe he is, maybe he isn't, but he's not, I'm not doing anything, he's not doing anything,

  • it's just my idea of his state or his feeling, okay?

  • So again, we use these also like action verbs, but there's no action.

  • Then you have your modals like will, can, could, may, might, should, these are all verbs

  • that are used with other verbs, okay, or by themselves but with another verb understood,

  • so, "He can".

  • Can he swim?

  • Yes, he can, but "can" means "swim".

  • He can swim.

  • Can be able to.

  • So, these modals give you a little bit of extra information about the main verb, okay?

  • Will is used to talk about future, would is talking about hypothetical, should - recommendation,

  • may - probability, so each of these modals has a particular function, and you should

  • study the different modals and the different functions each has.

  • Auxiliary, these are helping verbs: be, do, have.

  • These are the auxiliary verbs.

  • They are used to help a main verb do its action.

  • So, for example, if you have a present perfect verb, you have "have" or "has" as the helping

  • verb.

  • In a question, you use a helping verb.

  • "Did you go?"

  • So, "did go", not "went you", right?

  • You don't do that.

  • You split the verb into it's auxiliary and it's main.

  • The auxiliary takes the tense, okay?

  • But again, that's a different lesson altogether.

  • And then when it comes to verbs, it's very, very important that you study the tenses.

  • Past, present perfect, and know how to use the base verb means just the verb by itself,

  • the idea of the verb, not the action or anything like that, or the infinitive "to" verb.

  • "To be", "to play", "to want", okay?

  • So, these are the different verbs you need to study.

  • These are the aspects of the verb that you really need to study, okay?

  • And then you'll know how to use them.

  • Now, every sentence in English, every clause in English has a verb in it.

  • At least one verb as the main verb, and then other verbs as infinitives or base verbs.

  • So, study these.

  • Now, before I go on, I highly, highly recommend that you get yourself a good grammar book

  • to start studying the basics, at least, of grammar.

  • Without a good grasp of grammar, you can't make good English sentences in speaking or

  • writing.

  • You'll have a very hard time understanding sentences in English, okay?

  • Get yourself a good grammar book, learn the different types of verbs, learn the tenses,

  • start using them correctly, okay?

  • Let's look at adverbs.

  • Okay, so now we're going to look at adverbs, okay?

  • And a lot of people think because adjectives describe nouns that adverbs describe verbs.

  • And they're correct, adverbs do describe verbs, they give you a little more information about

  • the verb, but they're not only describing verbs, they can also describe adjectives and

  • they can describe other adverbs, okay?

  • So, it's very important to remember that adverbs are multifunctional.

  • They do many things, and there are many different types of adverbs, okay?

  • If you want to talk about pace, okay, I walked fast.

  • I walked quickly.

  • Talking about the pace, the speed, okay?

  • If you want to talk about the strength, okay, "He lifted weights angerly.", whatever, or

  • with some sort of intensity or quality is another one, okay?

  • Intensity, like very, like very happy, so I have an adjective: I am very happy, instead

  • of just saying "happy".

  • Very happy.

  • I am making it more intensifying.

  • Or I can also do the other way.

  • I can mitigate, I can make less happy.

  • I'm somewhat happy.

  • Okay?

  • Negation, like "no" or "not", these are actually adverbs.

  • Expectancy, or expectation.

  • For example, "already" and "yet".

  • I haven't don't it yet.

  • I have already done it.

  • These are adverbs.

  • They tell you about expectation, about something that's already happened, something that hasn't

  • happened, it can be about time, for example, "I just finished.", so lots of different ways

  • to describe verbs, lots of different ways to describe adjectives, and if you think about

  • adverbs, "I speak very slowly.".

  • Slowly describes speak, the verb.

  • Very describes slowly, the adverb, so you can have many different adverbs in a sentence.

  • Some will modify verbs, some will modify adjectives, some will modify other adverbs, okay?

  • So you can mix them all up.

  • Now, you can have simple adverbs like fast, quickly, slowly, highly, intentionally, in

  • many cases you can take an adjective and add "-ly", okay?

  • Take an adjective, add an "-ly" into it and make it into an adverb, but not always, and

  • then there are other words that are just adverbs by themselves, like for example, "very".

  • Very is just an adverb, you're not going to use it in any other way, and it's an intensifier.

  • Now, I could fill the board with all kinds of different adverbs, but there's not much

  • point in that.

  • Again, you should get yourself a good grammar book and study the different types of adverbs

  • you can use and start practicing them and when you find yourself something good to read

  • in English, try to pick out the adverbs.

  • Try to pick out the adjectives.

  • Try to pick out each of the different parts of speech and figure out how they're being

  • used in these sentences.

  • Now, another way adverbs are used, we have adverb clauses to talk about or to describe

  • a relationship between an independent clause and a time and a reason and purpose, okay?

  • So, although - "Although I like to eat pizza, I don't eat it often.".

  • Often - frequency adverb.

  • Different - another type, alright?

  • Often is an adverb.

  • "Don't eat", modifying "eat often", "not", negation.

  • So, you have adverbs all over the place, you have to know how they're being used, etc.

  • Another thing to remember, adverbs often ask questions in a sentence.

  • They don't ask - answer what or whom, okay?

  • These would be objects.

  • They answer "where, why, how".

  • "I went", I went where? "to the store".

  • "To the store", although it's a prepositional phrase, and again, we're going to talk about

  • prepositions separately, this is acting as an adverb to answer the question "where",

  • okay?

  • The building was designed by a famous architect.

  • By whom?

  • Okay?

  • Designed by whom?

  • It answers the question "whom", so that's actually an adjective, object, preposition.

  • So, you have to understand what's the relationship between the phrase and the verb or whatever

  • the clause is that came before it, okay?

  • So, adverbs often answer these other questions "where, why, how, when", etc., "for what purpose?",

  • okay?

  • So, these are the adverbs, but again, lots of different types.

  • Make sure that you get a good grammar book and figure out which ones you need to know

  • and how to use them, okay?

  • Now, if you have any questions about adverbs or verbs, please go to www.engvid.com and

  • ask me in the comment section there.

  • There's also going to be a quiz to make sure that you recognize adverbs and verbs and the

  • different types, and of course, if you liked this lesson, please subscribe to my YouTube

  • channel and come back for more grammar lessons and other things like that.

  • Okay?

  • See you then.

  • Bye.

Hi, welcome to www.engvid.com , I'm Adam.

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A2 adverb transitive action sentence object grammar

Parts of Speech: Verbs & Adverbs

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    Summer posted on 2020/07/30
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