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  • Hm hm hm hm, whew, so much to learn.

  • Hey, James from www.engvid.com . Today's lesson, I want to teach you about Super Learning,

  • you know, from one of my favorite, well, not my favorite superhero, but my brother's and

  • a good friend of mine's superhero: Superman.

  • Why is he Superman?

  • Because he does everything better than the average person.

  • Today's lesson is how to learn better.

  • Now, I'm not saying better than the average person, but to improve your ability to learn

  • or to, yeah, be better than the average person when they learn.

  • And you might say "Why is that important?

  • This is an English lesson."

  • Learning English: the grammar, vocabulary, syntax, reading and writing, they're all great

  • things.

  • The problem is when you're not able to learn on a constant basis and continually improve,

  • if you get bored and stagnant, you stop learning, you stop working, you give it up.

  • If I can give you some tools with which to improve and give you the ability to learn

  • faster, as you get it in faster and you learn, you will complete the goal that you started

  • for yourself, which was to learn English.

  • So, let's go to the board and do some Super Learning.

  • Alright?

  • Super Learning, it's Mr. E with his big "S" on his chest, flying powerfully.

  • This lesson I'm giving to a guy named Joseph Alain Leconte, he's from Haiti, I was out

  • on the street one day and he came up and said "Hey, I watch your videos, thank you very

  • much!", and Alain - sorry, Joseph Alain, thank you very much for stopping to say hello.

  • I always appreciate it and I love the support that you guys give.

  • But let me get to the board and get to the lesson, that's why you're here.

  • So, we're going to go one, two, three, four, five, six, seven different things or exercises

  • I can give you to help you become a Super Learner.

  • Super Learning isn't anything special, it's basically doing not just your best, that's

  • one thing, it's maximizing your potential, and what I mean by - you have a line that

  • you start at, and here's what you can possibly do.

  • Most of us, at our best, move up here.

  • When we do Super Learning, we actually go up here and learn as much as we can actually

  • do.

  • And it's surprising how much you can take in and how much you can use to become better

  • in a short period of time if you're given certain tools, and I'm going to give you a

  • few hints today.

  • One of the first things is there's Mr. E with a megaphone, he's speaking out.

  • If it's written material, say it out loud.

  • What?

  • Well, when you read it, read it, that's using your vision, okay?

  • There are three ways learn, there are actually more, but three basic ones people are taught

  • in teachers' colleges that most students use to learn.

  • One is visual, with your eye, one is auditory with your ear, and the other kinesthetic,

  • doing something.

  • That's why, in school, you'll notice teachers write on a board, you look at it, then they

  • speak, you listen, then you write down information.

  • By doing those three, you can keep up to 80% of the information, alright?

  • And also, repetition and a few other things.

  • But there's the things that help you learn.

  • A lot of people have things that they're better at, so some people are better at listening

  • than they are at understanding information when it's written, or when they do it, they're

  • confused, but if you explain it to them, they're like "Oh, I get it, I can do that."

  • Same with some people, they need to see it, you demonstrate it, they can understand, but

  • if you say it to them or make them do it, they don't, okay?

  • So, there's two of the three, and obviously number three, the kinesthetic, if they do

  • it, they understand much better than if you write it on the board or explain it.

  • So, why am I telling you "If it's written, say it"?

  • Well remember, I said if all three are combined you learn better?

  • So, if something's written down, one of the better ways to understand it is to say it

  • out loud because when it's written, you're using your visual.

  • When you say it out loud, that's right, your auditory comes in.

  • It's another component, so it means more of your brain has to be used to absorb the information.

  • It's also got a repetition factor.

  • Because you read it and then you say it, you're repeating it to make it go deeper, so it's

  • not just one time, I'm finished, it's one, "How are you today?"

  • "How are you today?"

  • By doing that alone, guess what?

  • That's right, you've listened, you've watched, but you've done the third one by accident,

  • by opening your mouth, you're using kinesthetic: "How are you today?"

  • You've done it three times now.

  • You've looked at it, you've said it, you've heard yourself, three repetitions for one

  • reading.

  • Some people will read it once, by doing that alone, you're doing it three times, so you

  • can see, you can learn three times as quickly.

  • That's why we call it Super Learning, taking what you have and maximizing your potential.

  • Also, when you're saying it out loud, it gives your brain the opportunity to critique or

  • look at that information, because you're saying it, does it make sense to you?

  • Why doesn't it make sense?

  • What is confusing to me?

  • When you're looking it down, you might say "I don't understand", or understand and it

  • stops.

  • When you say, "Does this sentence even work?", cool?

  • Alright.

  • Next: If it's spoken material, write it down.

  • Oh, it's the same, you just repeated it.

  • No.

  • It is the same in that we are using more senses to learn it, but when something's spoken,

  • it's quickly forgotten.

  • So, the added bonus to writing it down is you have notes to remind you so you can look

  • at it later.

  • But, one of the important things about writing it down is it's a motor skill that forces

  • your body to go through, once again, we're going to kinesthetic movement, forcing the

  • brain to work because you're taking sound and you're interpreting it into a - I would

  • say, visual medium, so then you've got the kinesthetic writing it, then it's the looking

  • at it, because I've never met anyone who writes like this.

  • Okay.

  • Usually they write and they look.

  • So, when you're in a lecture hall, most students do this naturally.

  • They write it down.

  • I met a person who was really interesting, well maybe I'm making that up and it was something

  • I read, but they said that they were at a meeting with someone and the person actually

  • - they wanted to meet this person and talk to them.

  • Just imagine a big manager and a small employee.

  • The big manager wanted to meet the small employee and the big manager took out a book and a

  • pen and started writing down what the small employee said.

  • It's like "Why?"

  • "Well, I can learn from you."

  • So, when I'm sitting there talking to you, I can learn from you if I'm writing it down.

  • If I don't, it gets forgotten, so it makes it more important to my brain because if I'm

  • writing it - taking the time, my brain goes "This must be important, I should remember

  • it."

  • It also gives me the opportunity, or you the opportunity, to go over what you've written

  • down and see if it makes sense and clarify it.

  • So you get to question it, think about it, give it some sense in your head, and it helps

  • you remember it.

  • So, these are brother and sister.

  • If it's written material, say it out loud.

  • Try to see if you can actually understand it when you just say it to yourself.

  • If it's spoken material, write it down.

  • Write it down afterwards and look and go "Does this actually make sense?"

  • Now, going with the writing, we've spoken about writing twice, there's a third one.

  • This is rather interesting.

  • Most of you, when you think of writing - or actually, let's actually be honest - most

  • of you in the 21st century, you don't write, you type.

  • You go to a classroom, you sit down, you type - click click click, right?

  • Click, click, click, or you do on your cell phone - click, click, click, and you take

  • these notes.

  • It reminds me of people who take pictures of everything and you ask them "Do you remember

  • that concert we went to last year?"

  • "Yes."

  • "Do you look at the pictures?"

  • "No."

  • "But you took many pictures."

  • "Yes."

  • "But you don't look at them."

  • "Yeah."

  • It's like, it was a waste.

  • You should have watched and enjoyed instead of taking pictures that you never look at.

  • So, you've missed it twice.

  • You've missed the actual thing and now you're missing what's actually in your computer.

  • The same with typing.

  • When you type, it actually doesn't activate your brain as much.

  • "Well, I took the notes, you said write it down."

  • I said "Yeah, write, write, I didn't say 'type'."

  • When you type it, your brain doesn't really know that this an "S" button and this is a

  • "T" button and this is a "U" button.

  • It has no clue.

  • It just knows "press button, press button, press button".

  • When you're writing, each character is individual, so it forces the brain to pay attention to

  • what you're doing, and that paying attention to what you're doing makes the language or

  • whatever subject you're studying go deeper into your brain.

  • Now, you notice I said here, I said "Write in cursive, do not print."

  • And some of you are like "What's that?"

  • I know!

  • Time has changed.

  • There was a time when I went to school, you had to learn cursive.

  • In fact, it was so bad, they gave you a pencil because you weren't good enough, and when

  • you mastered cursive, they gave you a pen and everybody waited for that day to be given

  • a pen like "You may now write in permanent ink, no more pencil for you because you're

  • a big boy now!"

  • So, for those of you who don't know what cursive is, because some of you won't, this is cursive.

  • Now, some of you right now are going "What did he just do?

  • Is that - is that Arabic?

  • Is that Sanskrit, what is that?

  • This is not English!"

  • This is cursive.

  • You're welcome.

  • Or, I can write it like this, I'm going to be off the board, but you'll see, you will

  • see what I mean.

  • The thing about cursive is it combines two parts or two part - the two parts of your

  • brain, your left and right hemisphere.

  • So, one is more artistic, one is more scientific, I mean, this is just general, don't take it

  • too seriously, even scientists have a problem with it, but they're saying the two parts

  • of your brain deal with different parts.

  • One form in function, one more logical thinking.

  • In cursive, it's combined, because when we write, that's more logical information, but

  • the cursive is artistic, you can see, swirl, swirl, dots, all art.

  • So, the two parts of the brain work together to make the information go deeper into the

  • brain, so you remember it better.

  • So, when I say "print", this is okay, not good enough.

  • You want to do this.

  • This will even require, for many of you, a lot of time to master.

  • I just recently started doing it again, and it took me a few days after years of being

  • able to do it to get this consistent.

  • You have to focus.

  • So, this is interesting in case you think "He just made that up, it came from nowhere!"

  • Well actually, I made it up with a whole bunch of important people down in the United States.

  • In The New York Times article, it was April 30th, 2013, the College Board findings, now

  • the college board in the States deals with the universities, and what they found is that

  • they have a general test that they give to all the students to see if they should go

  • to university.

  • They call it the SATs, but you don't need to know that.

  • But it's just a general test through America that everyone does to go into university and,

  • depending on your score, you can go to a better and better school, and they found that the

  • people who actually wrote in cursive outperformed not by millions, but outperformed or did better

  • than the people who printed, and I'm not even talking about typing, they just noticed that

  • these guys did better than these guys.

  • It's the same information, it's just they did it differently and gave their brain an

  • opportunity to work a little harder, to learn a little more.

  • So, I'm suggesting for you that when you do notes, try to write in cursive.

  • Here's a little secret: once you get good at cursive, it's actually faster, because

  • you flow, so you can write more.

  • Oh, who would have thought?

  • Like... raining in here, sweat dripping.

  • Okay, anyway.

  • The next one, we've talked about this and there, as I said, in the College Board findings,

  • they found the difference between printing and cursive and an improvement in people's

  • ability to remember the information and score or do better on tests.

  • That's real-world Super Learning.

  • Next one: Talk to yourself about it.

  • What?

  • Yeah, you're gonna be that person who walks down the street "So, I gotta get four bags

  • of milk, and then the cat said, and what I said to my boss..." and people - "They're

  • crazy, crazy!".

  • Yep, become that person.

  • Talk to yourself.

  • I have found that, if I'm reading something that's an idea and I start speaking about

  • it, the parts that I don't understand, I can't really talk about, I just get like "Uhhh",

  • and then that tells me to write down in cursive "I don't understand that and I have to re-do

  • it".

  • I've got to re-study that part because I can't explain it to myself.

  • Because when I can understand it, I can explain it to myself.

  • So, talk to yourself about it.

  • Whenever you get confused, that tells you that is a part you have to go back and study,

  • alright?

  • So, you're finding the holes in your knowledge.

  • So, if it's not increasing the knowledge, at least it's saying "You really don't know

  • this, you should study it."

  • Now, see this, has the "blah blah", see this, "blah, blah?"

  • That's me and you right now, or you and I. Teach someone.

  • I studied martial arts for a number of years, and one of my teachers used to make all of

  • the instructors teach someone else, so if you wanted to get a black belt, you had to

  • teach a class at brown