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  • Bonjour, comment ça va, ça va bien?

  • That's all I got.

  • So, I don't know if you know, but in Canada, we are taught French.

  • I was taught French from the time I was eight years old to when I was eighteen, so I studied

  • French for ten remarkable years.

  • Can I speak French?

  • No.

  • Can I understand when somebody speaks French to me?

  • No.

  • Can I read the cereal ingredients in French?

  • Yes!

  • This might be the same for you learning English.

  • Maybe you learned English in your school and you sat there and go "Why the hell am I ever

  • going to use this?"

  • That was me in French.

  • And when you get older, you realize: "Oh hey.

  • Do you know what?

  • English is kind of important now, damn, I should have paid attention in class."

  • Or you're just watching this video for fun.

  • Yeah, yeah fine, I get it.

  • So, English is a very peculiar, which means strange language, because we steal words from

  • many different languages.

  • English is based in Latin.

  • We also have German.

  • We also take words from French.

  • We also take words from the Greek language.

  • So, good luck.

  • This is what - one of the reasons our pronunciation is so difficult.

  • I could say the word now, but it's still really hard.

  • So, if you speak French or if you learned French, I've got a tip or a technique to help

  • you learn more English vocabulary, because we have stolen French words.

  • And you probably know these words already, but again, we have to be careful with our

  • pronunciation of these words, especially if you're living in the USA.

  • Because something happens when I cross the border.

  • For some reason, all hopes of French pronunciation is gone.

  • Canada's a little better because we have a huge French population, but yeah, I've heard

  • some really strange things coming from our neighbors in the South.

  • So, this lesson is to help you remember and learn vocabulary.

  • And hey, guess what, I'll teach some French at the same time.

  • But you might already know.

  • You might - not die, you might not die, you might die.

  • But you might get an invitation, and I'm pretty sure that initiation is also a French word

  • - from a friend on Facebook or someplace and it might say "RSVP".

  • And RSVP in French means "Répondez s'il vous plait".

  • "S'il vous plait" in French means "please" and "respond" means "answer".

  • We do not put the e here.

  • I think I was speaking Spanish or something at that point, so.

  • RSVP actually means hey, please answer me.

  • But we don't use it like this.

  • We just think "RSVP, okay.

  • This means tell the person yes or no."

  • Which is actually, we are responding to the invitation.

  • So, RSVP: "Répondez s'il vous plait", answer me!

  • Are you going to come to my fantastic party or not?

  • That's what I need to know.

  • I need a yes or a no from you, so answer me.

  • Next one.

  • If I translate this from French - I didn't translate it, I was Google, thank you, Google.

  • A la mode, okay.

  • It means "at way", or - I don't know, something about the way.

  • We use this predominantly for pie or ice cream.

  • So, you can go to a restaurant and get apple pie a la mode, and for some reason in English,

  • it doesn't mean on the side, it means you get ice cream.

  • Wow, we have really stretched that one.

  • So, a la mode in French - at the way, or on the side.

  • In English, means "ice cream on the pie".

  • But hey.

  • Hey, what's English, right?

  • Confusing, crazy.

  • Crème brûlée.

  • How's my pronunciation?

  • Crème brûlée, crème brûlée.

  • Crème brûlée means "cream", crème is "cream", and brûlée means "to burn".

  • So. you go oh, burned crème, awesome.

  • Did you make a mistake in the kitchen?

  • Crème brûlée to use is a delicious dessert where they take cream and they burn it, oh yeah.

  • But it actually makes a beautiful caramel tasting dessert.

  • So, crème brûlée.

  • Don't worry, I haven't burned your cream.

  • I made you a wonderful dessert.

  • crème brûlée.

  • These are all food words and I'm getting hungry, damn!

  • Café au lait.

  • Ole, ole, ole!

  • Café means "coffee", au means "with" or "in" and lait means "milk".

  • So, when you go to your fancy coffee shops and you walk up and go "I want a café au

  • lait, please?"

  • You're just telling the person, you know what, put some milk in my coffee please, sir.

  • But you're doing it in French, so you think you're fancy, mmhmm.

  • You're not.

  • Just ask for coffee with milk, please?

  • It will save you a lot of money at Starbucks, I'm sure too.

  • Because I'm sure a coffee without milk is free, but a café au lait, whew, five dollars

  • more for you!

  • Because you don't know French.

  • I'm saving you money, too!

  • This next delicious treat is foie gras, foie gras.

  • Foie means "liver", and I'm sure my pronunciation is bad on that one.

  • And gras means "fatty".

  • Foie gras to us is a duck liver.

  • So, apparently, they do terrible things to ducks in France.

  • They feed the ducks lots of food so the duck is really fat.

  • And then we kill them and we eat their liver.

  • Delicious again.

  • Thank you for making your ducks really fat so we can eat them.

  • Hmm.

  • I could have some foie gras right now.

  • This one, wow, this blew my mind!

  • Look at me, learning with you.

  • Now, this how we have to be careful when we pronounce things.

  • So, hors d'oeuvre.

  • I have heard Americans say this.

  • We say "or derves", we say "or", okay, "derves".

  • Try, "or derves".

  • I know it's a terrible way we have changed it because I'm sure it sounds much more eloquent

  • in French.

  • Please don't say "hore doreves".

  • It's "or derves".

  • So, in French, this means "outside of work".

  • No way!

  • In English, an hors d'oeuvre is an appetizer.

  • It's something that, if you're at a party, someone passes you some little things to eat

  • with a toothpick, you have some wine, it's great.

  • But in French, it means, I guess "hours outside of work".

  • So maybe this is like, French people were like, "I'm not working, give me some food!"

  • I like this idea.

  • Give me some of that duck, I want some of that duck liver, give it to me.

  • I'm not working, okay?

  • So hor d'oeuvre means outside of work, but we mean it like delicious food.

  • Cool.

  • Next one, du jour.

  • You will see this in many, many, many restaurants.

  • Soup du jour, okay?

  • Dessert du jour.

  • It means "of the day".

  • So, you think your wonderful little restaurant - wow, soup du jour.

  • Hmm, 17 dollars for soup du jour.

  • That's a good deal.

  • Nah, you're just getting ripped off, aren't you?

  • It means "of that day".

  • It means that particular day, that restaurant opened this pre-packaged soup, put some water

  • in it, and that's your soup of the day, thank you.

  • Enjoy that.

  • Did you commit a faux pas?

  • So, we have this, we say, "I've committed a faux pas" and we sound so fancy when we

  • say it.

  • Eh, it's close.

  • In French, apparently means "false step" like "woah, I saw a false step there, watch out".

  • And we mean it to say that we've done something wrong or we've made a mistake.

  • I made a giant faux pas in my lesson, I must start again.

  • This is one that, again, I was amazed at.

  • So, ménage a trois, as you guys might know in English, means sex between three people.

  • Woah, hey!

  • Apparently in French it means "house of three".

  • So, if you have a mom and a dad and a you, guess what?

  • You are in a ménage a trois, which sounds really dirty right now because in our bastardization

  • of the French language, it only means sex.

  • Wow.

  • Okay.

  • Sorry, France.

  • This is fun.

  • As a child, I always loved this one: eau de toilette.

  • Oh, you should so beautiful.

  • Would you like some eau de toilette?

  • And then you look at it and go: "eau" means "water", "de" means "of" and "toilette" means

  • "toilet", oh my God.

  • So, I've been actually putting toilet water on myself to make myself smell...what?

  • So, I've been just going to the toilet and going "Hahaha, look at me, I've got toilet

  • water.

  • I smell delicious."

  • I don't think so.

  • I don't know how this became - we just call this perfume for us.

  • It's a lower grade of perfume.

  • In France they say "parfum", which is beautiful and smells good.

  • Water of the toilet, yeah.

  • I'm not too sure what happened there.

  • I blame marketers.

  • Marketers are like "Let's take a word in French that's really terrible and make people buy

  • it for a lot of money.

  • Let's take, okay, toilet water, hahaha, and make people spend $100 on it and that'll be

  • funny!"

  • It is funny, actually.

  • Thank you, whoever did that, yes!

  • Next one, this is fun.

  • A chaise longue.

  • So, we say in Canada, we say "chaise longue".

  • In French, I'm sure it's "chaise longue" or something French, lots of French accents.

  • So, this means "chair long".

  • So, when I was researching this, I was like "No way!"

  • Because in America, people will say "lounge chair".

  • Now, a chaise longue, as we say in English, is a chair, but it has room for your feet.

  • You almost saw my feet, damn!

  • It has room for your legs, so it's a very long chair.

  • Makes sense, wow.

  • We didn't hurt that word too much.

  • So, if you're in a house of three, and you're doing a little bit of a ménage a trois, you

  • can sit on the long chair and you can have some toilet water to make yourself smell nice.

  • It'll be great, it'll be great, just don't go to France and say these words.

  • I'm Ronnie.

  • If you speak French, welcome to learning English.

  • Good luck.

  • I don't even know how to say that in French, but yeah.

  • Just good luck, sorry.

  • English, I'm sorry.

  • I'm so embarrassed now.

Bonjour, comment ça va, ça va bien?

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A2 french foie gras foie gras du toilet

Learn English vocabulary from French: foie gras, du jour, faux pas...

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    Summer posted on 2020/07/30
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