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  • Do do do do, whoa, E, stop it!

  • Hi, James from www.engvid.com . E is about to - going "hi-yah!"

  • He's been practicing karate, it seems.

  • And he's breaking bread.

  • I don't know why he would do this, but it seems today's lesson is on business idioms

  • using bread.

  • So, let me clarify a little bit.

  • These idioms aren't just for business.

  • You can use them for other things, but I'm showing you how you can use these idioms in

  • a business setting.

  • Now, why am I doing this?

  • Idioms or phrases are sort of a shortcut.

  • What I mean is we can say long sentences about something, but sometimes by putting two or

  • three words together, or four, the meaning is given to someone much - much faster and

  • much clearer than if you gave many sentences.

  • So, today's lesson is to teach you how to communicate better with other people by speaking,

  • but also when they're communicating with you, what they're actually trying to say.

  • Okay?

  • That's why we're doing it.

  • Now, how we're going to do that?

  • We're going to look at some new vocabulary you may not know and then I'm going to give

  • you the idioms and tell you when a good time to use them is.

  • Alright?

  • So, let's go to the board and get started.

  • Shall we?

  • So, E, you're breaking bread all over the place.

  • Tsk Tsk Tsk, crazy, crazy, crazy.

  • Let's start with the vocabulary first, to make sure you understand the vocabulary, so

  • when I go through with the idioms or phrases, they'll be easy for you to understand.

  • So, the first one is "chaff".

  • Now, here's some wheat up here, okay.

  • Now, these little things up here and this here, it's no good.

  • What is wheat?

  • We use wheat to make bread.

  • Yes, we use rye and barley and other things, but a lot of times we use wheat to make bread.

  • And the chaff is a protective covering.

  • So, you can think - I've got this water here, and this plastic protects it.

  • That's like the chaff.

  • It's actually no good, just because we can't drink plastic.

  • But it does protect the water we want to keep.

  • That's what chaff is for wheat.

  • Dough.

  • Dough is when you take flour, a little bit of water, some salt.

  • You can use other things and you make bread.

  • You might have seen your mother take dough, put some flour and water together and then

  • roll it out and then put it in the oven to make bread.

  • Now, slice is usually a thin piece of something.

  • Specifically, when we talk about food, a slice could be a slice of an apple, where you take

  • a knife, you cut a piece - a thin piece of it that becomes a slice.

  • It's also the verb is actually "to slice" as well.

  • So, we slice as a verb - a piece of material can be a slice.

  • So, we can have a slice of apple or a slice of bread, cool?

  • So, that's the vocabulary we want to look at.

  • Now, let's go to the board and take a look at the idioms and phrases.

  • The first one I have it "separate the wheat from the chaff".

  • As I told you, the chaff is the protective coating.

  • It's also known as garbage or refuse.

  • Something you would throw away or something that's not good.

  • The wheat is valuable, because when we make bread, we use the wheat to make the bread.

  • So, when we separate the wheat from the chaff, we take the thing that is good away from the

  • thing that is bad.

  • And we want to keep the thing that is good, okay?

  • So, let's say you have ten people that you are looking to interview for a job, and you

  • might say, "Uh, they kind of look pretty good.

  • Why don't we give them a test, because as we give them the test, the ones that are good

  • will do on well on the test.

  • The ones who are bad won't do so well.

  • And we will separate the good candidates for the job from the bad ones", okay?

  • So, you can see how they would use that in business.

  • Rolling in dough.

  • Okay, so I told you before about dough.

  • It's when you take flour and water - that comes from wheat.

  • You mix it to make bread.

  • Well, before you do that, you have to roll it - and this is called a rolling pin - to

  • make it come flat to make the bread.

  • Well, rolling in dough also means to have a lot of money.

  • Because the word "dough" in English can be used for "money".

  • See, you're getting extra vocabulary.

  • So, if you have a lot of dough, you've got a lot of money.

  • If you're rolling in dough, you can imagine all of this is money and this is you.

  • And you're rolling in dough.

  • You're rich, okay?

  • So, first we start with the wheat, then we go to the dough before we make the bread.

  • But even when you have bread - oh, do you know what "bread" means as well?

  • This is interesting.

  • "Dough" means "dough" - oh sorry, "dough" means "money" and "bread" means "money".

  • If you hear someone say, "That costs a lot of bread".

  • No, they are not taking bread from the grocery store, going and giving it to someone.

  • It means "money".

  • So, "dough" means money and "bread" means money.

  • Please try to remember that as we go through the idioms and you'll go, "Oh my gosh, it

  • makes sense."

  • So, when we say "man does not live by bread alone".

  • Now, you might say, "What does that have to do with business?"

  • Well, a lot of people, if you're working, it's not just about the money.

  • For some people, it's about getting new opportunities at work to learn and to grow.

  • To have good social contacts, to be able to give input or give something to the company.

  • So, when someone says, "Man does not live by bread alone", they could be saying in business,

  • "Look, you pay me a lot of money, but the job is not interesting.

  • I'm not growing as a person.

  • I'm not making good contacts.

  • I'm not giving anything to the business, so I'm not happy.

  • So, yes, the money is nice, but I need more."

  • You can also see how that can be used for people in ordinary life, where we say, you

  • can have the basic necessities, which means the basic things you need like bread, water,

  • food.

  • But you need more than that to have a good life, okay?

  • Now, "break bread".

  • Notice how we had - we made the bread, we got the bread, now you're breaking bread.

  • Hi-yah!

  • That's what my man over here was doing.

  • What do we mean, "to break bread"?

  • Well, in many countries in the world, bread is what we call a staple, or an important

  • part of family life and families, they have bread.

  • In this particular case, and how we use it in business is - there are two ways.

  • When you say "to break bread", it means to get together and have a meal.

  • Share a meal together.

  • But it's not just eating.

  • It means to also, while we share this meal, have good conversation, share and connect.

  • Get closer together.

  • So, in business, clearly you want to have people break bread and meet.

  • There's also another meaning, and it's similar, but a little bit different and this difference

  • is important.

  • Sometimes, when you break bread with somebody, it's because you used to be enemies.

  • And now you're sitting down at the table and you're going to have a meal together, but

  • you're also saying, "With this meal, we will forget everything bad that happened before.

  • We will forgive this.

  • We will move forward as partners or friends."

  • So sometimes, with your enemies, you need to break bread with the enemy, which means

  • have that meal together and say, "Okay, whatever differences we had, we now say okay, forget

  • it.

  • We're moving forward as friends."

  • So, one is friends or family getting together, or colleagues or colleagues, co-workers eating

  • together, no problem.

  • The other one is when enemies say, "No more enemies, we shall now be friends."

  • Okay?

  • So, we've got "breaking bread".

  • So now that we've broken some bread, let's break the bread a little bit more.

  • And we're going to move up to number five.

  • We're going to go to "the greatest thing since sliced bread."

  • Now, if you live in the modern age, you have sliced bread, so you're like, "What's the

  • big deal?"

  • Well, a long time ago, bread was not sliced.

  • You always had to cut it with a knife, so you always had to have a knife to cut the

  • bread or to carry the bread.

  • Then somebody, some genius person, started slicing bread and saying, "Here, the bread

  • is in pieces already!"

  • Remember, we talked about "slice"?

  • And then it was easy, and they made sandwiches and carried the bread and everyone was so

  • happy.

  • It was the greatest invention ever!

  • So, when somebody says to you, "This is the greatest thing since sliced bread", they're

  • saying your idea is great.

  • So, here's an example you might think about.

  • James, what could he be possibly talking about?

  • Well, dododo.

  • Sorry, cell phone.

  • It's the greatest thing since sliced bread.

  • You can talk, take pictures, and communicate with other people.

  • Run a business off of it.

  • A good idea.

  • And that's what happens when you hear someone say, "This is the greatest thing since sliced

  • bread", they're saying the idea is a very good one.

  • Now that we've got this fantastic idea from number five, what does number six mean?

  • "Bread and butter".

  • Well, bread and butter are basics, because for most people in most cultures, you have

  • bread and then you will have butter and you put that butter on.

  • So, when we say this is a "bread and butter", I actually knew a guy named Ken.

  • Or, I still know Ken.

  • And he does karate.

  • He's a very good karate guy.

  • And he would say, "This is a bread and butter technique."

  • He meant it was a basic technique - hiyah! - but it worked, it really worked well.

  • So, if someone says to you - or when someone says to you, "This is my bread and butter",

  • it means this is where I get my basics from, this is where I am good, alright?

  • So, this is my bread and butter.

  • For when most people say, "This is my bread and butter", it's where I make my - excuse

  • me for a second - it's where I make my money from.

  • But if someone says to you "This is our bread and butter", it's the basic thing we make

  • our money from.

  • Number seven, "Know which side one's bread is buttered".

  • Funny, because we started with bread and butter here.

  • For most people, you don't put butter on both sides of the bread.

  • You put it on one side.

  • When someone says, "Know which side your bread is buttered", it means know who the people

  • you must be loyal to or know where you get your advantages from.

  • Because we all know when the butter is on one side of the bread, it tastes very good.

  • And the other side is dry.

  • So, if you have a choice between two people and one person has been very good to you in

  • the past and helped you a lot and is going to be beneficial in the future, that is the

  • person you should help or be loyal to, or know that is the side your bread is buttered

  • on.

  • They told you, it's about business, but you can also use these things for other situations

  • as well, just to remind you.

  • Number eight, from here, we talk about "somebody is toast".

  • And you might say, "What do you mean, 'somebody is toast'?"

  • Well, here's the funny thing.

  • You put dough in the oven.

  • It becomes bread, so you cook it.

  • But then, when you put in the toaster, you kind of burn it a little bit, but not too

  • much, because it goes brown and you burn it a little bit.

  • When we say "somebody is toast", because usually when it's done, it's complete, it's finished.

  • We say, and this isn't a good thing.

  • If you are toast, it means you're finished.

  • It means you've lost your job.

  • It means maybe you lost your relationship.

  • If something is toast, it's no good.

  • It is now ruined.

  • So, if your career is toast, you've got no career left.

  • You're out of a job.

  • IF your relationship is toast, your partner is leaving you, okay?

  • So, "toast" in business, you go, "The competition will be toast with our new invention, which

  • is the greatest thing since sliced bread.

  • They're going to be gone after this comes out."

  • Now, it's not exactly the opposite, but you could kind of see the opposite is with "bread

  • winner".

  • The bread winner is a person who brings home the most money in a family, okay?

  • So, if you're the bread winner, you make more than the other person, which means two people

  • can be working, but one person might make $100,000 and the other person $20,000, the

  • bread winner is the person making $100,000.

  • So, if you're the bread winner in your family, you might be the only one working and you're

  • bringing all the money for the family.

  • Because if you remember rightly, I said that bread is usually very important for most families

  • throughout the world, or around the world.

  • So, if you're the bread winner, you're the one with the money to bring the bread in,

  • okay?

  • So, we've covered all nine idioms or phrases I wanted you to look at.

  • Separate the wheat from the chaff - take what is good from what is bad.

  • Be rolling in dough - make money.

  • And remember, "dough" means "money".

  • Man does not live by bread alone - we could say "woman" doesn't as well today.

  • This is the old way of saying it, and it means you need more in life than just the basics.

  • In this case, it could be money or it could just be, you know, the basic necessities of

  • life.

  • We're saying it here as in money.