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  • -Hello, everybody. Thank you so much for joining me.

  • I really appreciate you being on the show.

  • Thank you for coming back and talking to me.

  • I appreciate this.

  • -Thanks for having us. -Anytime, Jimmy.

  • -Before we get into the show,

  • I just want to say congratulations to Tan.

  • You became a U.S. citizen like a couple minutes ago.

  • -Whoo! -I really did!

  • -Yay.

  • -That is so cool!

  • -Thanks! Thanks.

  • It's taken 20 years to get here, and we're so darn grateful.

  • -Are you se-- Was it 20 years, for real?

  • -20 years, and it actually feels kind of perfect

  • that it happened right now.

  • -Really? -Yeah.

  • -We need every vote. Like, every vote counts.

  • I'm going to vote.

  • -You're going to vote. Oh, my gosh.

  • Have you registered yet? No, just minutes ago.

  • -Well, you're the first thing I'm doing

  • since I became a citizen,

  • so as soon as I'm done with this,

  • I have a break, and I'm going to register to vote,

  • without a doubt. -Priorities, Tan.

  • Priorities. -I know. I know.

  • I mean, it took so long to get here.

  • -20 years is a long time. -Yeah.

  • But the actual experience of getting my oath thing done today

  • was just lovely.

  • It was such a beautiful, emotional experience.

  • As you may know, I'm not much of a crier.

  • If anyone knows me from "Queer Eye,"

  • I'm not the crier of the group.

  • But I got so emotional.

  • It felt just really powerful to become an American today.

  • -Do you feel attacked, Antoni?

  • [ Laughter ]

  • -My sensitivity is my strength.

  • -It is. It's beautiful. It's beautiful.

  • -What were you thinking of? Who were you thinking of?

  • Why did you get emotional?

  • -I was just thinking of all the times I've been sent home

  • and the people I've missed, and I was apart --

  • I was away from my husband for six years

  • because I was sent home.

  • And so just to now be in a position

  • where I know nobody can kick me out

  • and I can actually truly make some changes,

  • actually vote to change and encourage people

  • to vote to change the state of this country.

  • Like, that -- that really made me feel very emotional.

  • The timing couldn't be more perfect for me.

  • -Jonathan, you were saying earlier

  • that the show obviously is not a cure

  • for all the world's problems,

  • but it may help give some light to people that need it.

  • -Yeah.

  • I think having, you know, moments

  • to, like, rest and recharge is great,

  • and, you know, like, "British Baking Challenge"

  • is, you know, that for me.

  • And yeah, so, I think you need sort of, like, joy

  • that you know people can experience in this time is good.

  • But getting your citizenship, I think, is a pretty --

  • That is a change, honey.

  • You want to talk about change, that is a some change.

  • And, Tan, not to go back to you, but I can't help it.

  • I could see the emotion in your face on that one picture.

  • I said, "I think Tan's been crying in public."

  • [ Speaking indistinctly ]

  • [ Laughter ]

  • -That's so cool.

  • I watched the first episode of this new season,

  • Season 5 for you guys,

  • and I know it's probably hard to promote a product right now

  • with all that's going on in the world,

  • but I will say, man, you guys do such a great job.

  • What an excellent show, top to bottom,

  • not just you guys, but the producing of the show,

  • the way it's -- how intelligent you guys are

  • and open to dealing with anything that comes at you.

  • I only watched the first episode

  • with the pastor, the openly gay pastor,

  • and, dude, it's not just the end of the show where you cry.

  • I cried like three times in the middle of the show

  • and going --

  • Karamo, specifically your scene, I think this was,

  • with all the other pastors sitting at the table.

  • I lost it.

  • And honestly, it's always, now and then, just a curveball

  • and I go, like, ah.

  • This was great that you're talking,

  • and you're making people have these conversations

  • that may be uncomfortable, but they're needed.

  • -What I love most about what you said

  • is that, you know, a lot of people have been like,

  • "How are you going to promote a show during this time

  • where, like, everyone is worried about a pandemic

  • and also is supporting the Black Lives Matter movement?"

  • I think what is beautiful

  • is that people get to take a break from --

  • a mental and emotional break, which is necessary

  • so that you can recharge and come back stronger

  • to help other people.

  • And it's nice because you get to see

  • these people that we're helping, our heroes,

  • turn into these full, whole, beautiful, vulnerable people.

  • And it kind of just recharges you and says, "You know what?

  • I want to go out there and protest.

  • I want to do better for tomorrow.

  • Let me recharge, break down, and come back,"

  • and I think that's really a beautiful part of our show.

  • -Yeah, I love that you're calling them heroes.

  • Heroes puts it in a different light for me.

  • And I think that's a great change that you guys made.

  • Antoni, do you want to talk about that?

  • -Yeah, I mean, like,

  • so, I've only seen the first two episodes.

  • -What?! You haven't binged it yet?

  • -I've been traveling. I drove from Texas to New York.

  • But I'm going to catch up on it, I swear.

  • But, like, you know, you brought up Noah, this openly gay pastor

  • who's basically stepping into a leadership position

  • in his church, and all of the struggles

  • and, like, the confidence that comes with that.

  • I'm so glad that you brought up Karamo's scene in that.

  • I just thought that was incredibly touching,

  • for Noah to be around, you know, other people of faith

  • who kind of, to use Jonathan's line, like, gave him permission

  • to be that leader.

  • I think that was incredibly empowering

  • and that's something that a lot of people can relate to.

  • We have Rahanna, a businesswoman and creative who --

  • She has her own dog grooming business called Stylish Pooch

  • with this, like, mobile truck

  • that she goes around, like, giving little makeovers to dogs.

  • -But also, I will say, Rahanna's makeovers are not little, honey.

  • She will make this dog pink, honey.

  • She will make it purple.

  • But she'll also do a trim.

  • You know, sometimes they're little, tiny, baby ones,

  • but other times, they're, like, epic make--

  • She's major. -She does it all.

  • I think the episode that really touched me the most

  • was Tyreek -- -Out of the two.

  • -No. Well --

  • [ Laughter ]

  • But no, I mean, I haven't seen Tyreek yet,

  • but I just kind of -- -It's so good. It's so good.

  • -That's one that I've really been thinking about a lot.

  • I mean, all these heroes in this season

  • and in every single season,

  • whether they're heroes in their own personal lives

  • or whether they're activists in their own right,

  • I think it's important now more than ever to honor heroes,

  • I think in a time of --

  • I think there's -- Maybe I speak for myself,

  • but there's been a lot of hopelessness.

  • Heroes give us hope.

  • It gives us someone to look up to,

  • and they come in all different, you know, shapes and sizes.

  • This morning, I was watching an interview with Gianna Floyd,

  • with George Floyd's daughter.

  • And her mother was talking about

  • how she doesn't fully understand what happened to her dad

  • when her mother tried explaining it,

  • but she knows that everyone's talking about it.

  • And she was saying, I think in a video segment,

  • like, "Daddy changed the world."

  • And as horrible as it is what happened to him,

  • it's people like that, that I look up to.

  • Or, like, I listened to -- You know, I turned on Instagram

  • five minutes before we logged in here,

  • and I saw that Tan got his citizenship,

  • and I'm thinking, like,

  • I think that takes a tremendous amount of courage

  • during times like this.

  • It's so easy to be a pessimist and to not have hope,

  • that something like that is just, like --

  • It's stuff like that that keeps me going,

  • and I'm just so grateful that we get to do it week after week,

  • hero after hero.

  • -Karamo, is there different types of grieving

  • and the ways to approach it?

  • -Yeah, definitely. And most people don't even realize

  • that they're grieving right now.

  • They're experiencing severe loss.

  • Like, what people don't realize,

  • even when the pandemic was happening,

  • you were grieving the loss of financial stability,

  • of our regular schedules.

  • And you have to go through a process of acknowledging it

  • and starting to heal from it.

  • And that's happening again when people --

  • It's now compounded also

  • with the fact that Black Lives Matter's movement is happening.

  • People are, you know, waking up

  • and they're going through so much loss,

  • and everyone is screaming out for, "I need change.

  • I need things to be different."

  • And it's a very beautiful moment that we're living in.

  • I mean, I just, I look at the five of our Instagrams,

  • even yours, Jimmy,

  • and all of us, we're just all in a space of, like,

  • if you're grieving what was happening,

  • if you want to see a better tomorrow,

  • it's okay to acknowledge it, and it's okay

  • to start trying to do things to move towards a better tomorrow.

  • -I was going to ask you guys, after five seasons,

  • do people kind of know what's about to happen to their lives?

  • Bobby, like, can you talk about, do people go, like,

  • "Oh, there they are, the Fab Five, and I get it.

  • You're going to cut my hair.

  • You're going to put me in an outfit."

  • -You know, it was very different for us for Season 1 and 2,

  • because no one had seen the show before.

  • No one knew who we were. No one knew what to expect.

  • Same with us. We had never seen the show.

  • We didn't know what to expect. I'd definitely say

  • it's become a little different as seasons goes on,

  • because a lot of our heroes have seen the show.

  • So, a lot of them have this idea in their mind

  • how they want to be perceived already on television,

  • and they have their narrative set,

  • and it's our job to get in there and just kind of make them --

  • kind of make them forget they're on a television show,

  • to where we really are actually helping them,

  • to where we really are getting down to the core problem

  • and helping change their life.

  • You know, we really get to go in there

  • and do our jobs to help people.

  • -I want to talk to you a little bit more.

  • Do you guys mind? Another five minutes, please?

  • -We'll take 20. -Yeah, absolutely.

  • -Alright, thank you. We'll be right back

  • with the cast of "Queer Eye." -Just like I didn't offer 20.

-Hello, everybody. Thank you so much for joining me.

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