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  • Hi there.

  • Welcome to my home away from my home away

  • from home, which is a long way of saying my home.

  • Happy Monday.

  • Is it Monday?

  • Yes.

  • It is Monday.

  • Happy Monday, everybody.

  • Also, in case you didn't know this,

  • today is the first day of American Beer Week.

  • Although I have a feeling a lot of you

  • were on your fifth or sixth week of American Beer Week.

  • A lot of people drinking.

  • If I know people, and I think I do.

  • I'm glad you could join me again for another hour together.

  • It's nice to have someone to talk to.

  • And it gives me a reason to vacuum.

  • Even though you're not seeing the rug,

  • know that it is vacuumed.

  • I hope you're enjoying the shows.

  • Obviously, it looks different for a lot of reasons.

  • For instance, I have my Executive Producer, Andy,

  • standing outside in my yard.

  • I love Andy.

  • I know it looks like he's wandering around aimlessly,

  • because that's what he's doing.

  • But he does a lot.

  • Basically, that's what he does on the show.

  • He just wanders around aimlessly.

  • But he does keep track on how long the interviews are going.

  • He tells me it's better to be too long than too short.

  • And I say, that's what she said.

  • It's a professional relationship, really.

  • Apparently not everyone who's watching

  • understands why I'm keeping Andy outside.

  • I'll explain it again.

  • Since we're in California, and the governor wants everyone

  • to observe social distancing, I thought

  • it would be safer with Andy outside.

  • Plus he spends most of the time tweeting,

  • so he should be with the birds.

  • Good one, Ellen, because tweeting is like birds.

  • Tweeting is like what birds do.

  • So that was the joke there.

  • It's a smart joke.

  • What I do is I say a joke, you explain it, I explain it,

  • everyone gets it.

  • And you like being out there, right, Andy?

  • I love it.

  • I love the fresh air.

  • I love that you and I cannot exchange droplets, as they say.

  • And it's just safe.

  • Right, and I but yet I get to see you every day,

  • which I love.

  • And I love it.

  • I'm so happy we did this.

  • I like to just set a good example.

  • But I'm sure you'd like to come inside at some point.

  • And lately, it seems like the rules are changing every day.

  • Some states are opening up now.

  • Some are loosening slowly.

  • Some are a little hesitant at first.

  • They've seen other people get hurt,

  • and they don't want to get hurt themselves.

  • But sometimes, you just have who say, what the heck?

  • And take a risk, because damn it, Pam,

  • you're too good to not put yourself out there,

  • and you said you don't want to stay single forever.

  • What was I talking about?

  • Oh, my God.

  • I don't know.

  • Actually, I want to know when it's the right time for Andy

  • to come inside.

  • I'm not a doctor or a medical expert.

  • I was raised Christian Science, which is why one of my legs

  • is shorter than the other.

  • I don't know what that means.

  • It's funny.

  • But I don't know if it's because of Christian Science, but it

  • one is an inch shorter.

  • I like it.

  • Since California's lockdown is supposed

  • to be ending this month, I want to know

  • what I'm supposed to do.

  • So I thought I would ask a real doctor.

  • Dr. Dre was not available, so I thought

  • I would ask someone who knows more

  • about this than me, which turns out to be literally anyone.

  • But I found someone who I think he can

  • answer all of the questions.

  • Please welcome the Chief Medical Correspondent

  • for CBS news, Jon LaPook.

  • Hi, Ellen.

  • Hi.

  • How are you?

  • I love this guy.

  • I'm good, Jon.

  • How are you?

  • Do I call you Doctor, Jon, Dr. Jon, or Jon, or Doctor,

  • or Mr. LaPook?

  • Jon.

  • Jon is fine.

  • Can I call you Ellen?

  • OK, Jon.

  • No.

  • I would prefer--

  • Dr. Ellen.

  • Yes.

  • I watch you all the time.

  • I'm very impressed by you.

  • And just in case people don't know who you are,

  • you are a real doctor.

  • You went to Yale and Columbia.

  • You were a resident at New York Presbyterian

  • Hospital, which is like the General

  • Hospital of the real world.

  • It's a good one.

  • And you follow me on Twitter, so you're doing everything right.

  • Tell me, first of all, what has this experience

  • been like for you?

  • Thank you for asking.

  • it's been bumpy.

  • It's a bumpy ride.

  • It's not easy, because I still have my medical practice.

  • I'm an internist and a gastroenterologist.

  • I love doing internal medicine.

  • And a bunch of my patients have gotten ill,

  • some of them quite ill.

  • And then, of course, I'm also the Chief Medical Correspondent

  • for CBS News.

  • So in general, you're always walking that line

  • between being a practicing doctor

  • and a medical correspondent, a TV doctor.

  • And so when I'm talking to somebody, whether it's

  • my one patient or millions of people,

  • I'm trying to think of them like you're my patient,

  • and how can I put this in the clearest way,

  • give it perspective, and not sugarcoat anything,

  • but say in a way that's not panicky and is embracing

  • science.

  • That's one of my favorite lines these days.

  • It's just embrace science.

  • It's so important to do that.

  • See?

  • And it's exactly the opposite of how

  • I was raised is to ignore science

  • and to think that we aren't really our bodies.

  • We aren't really our physical being.

  • So It's really-- I'm so lost in all of this stuff.

  • So obviously, I'm listening to everybody.

  • And I know what's going on.

  • And I'm socially distancing and all that.

  • But tell me, is there something today that we have learned,

  • is there anything as we're talking today that's changed?

  • Or is it still--

  • because everyone is now so over it.

  • You can see on the news, people are like,

  • they just want to go out and do things.

  • And is this really OK?

  • Yeah, I love that question, because we are at an inflection

  • point right now.

  • People are getting fed up with staying home.

  • And I get it.

  • It's really tough.

  • We all want to hug.

  • We want to leave our homes.

  • But this is a moment where we really

  • have to think about society and what's safe for everybody.

  • It's also a moment when I think our defense mechanism is

  • starting to crumble.

  • And I think about my dad.

  • My mom died in 2009, and my parents

  • had been married for 66 years.

  • And after a couple of months, my dad said to me,

  • is it OK I'm pretending she's still at the hairdresser?

  • And what was happening there was his defense mechanism,

  • denial, was crumbling.

  • And he was starting to realize she's not coming back.

  • And I think that's happening to us right now.

  • We're realizing our lives are changed.

  • We're in this for the long run.

  • But the long run includes great scientists

  • all over the world who are working on this,

  • people like Tony Fauci.

  • And so I don't want to be like a goody two shoes and Pollyanna

  • and saying everything's perfect.

  • But right now, we have a big challenge in front of us.

  • There are still lots of challenges.

  • But we've we're embracing that well.

  • There's been a lot of good progress.

  • We saw remdesivir as a drug.

  • That looks like it may have a role.

  • And it's a time when we just have to have faith in science.

  • So that being said, at what point

  • can people have someone over at the house.

  • If you know you've been quarantined,

  • they've been quarantining, can you have--

  • and when-- bottom line, when can Andy come inside?

  • Because he's been out there since we've been shooting.

  • And I'd like to have him come in at some point,

  • just to help clean.

  • Think about this.

  • When Andy comes into the house, he's

  • bringing with him everybody he's been in contact

  • with for the last two weeks.

  • So seriously, the incubation period of the is 2 to 14 days.

  • So if 10 days ago, for example, he was in contact with somebody

  • who had COVID-19 and didn't realize it,

  • because people can walk around asymptotically,

  • no symptoms have still shedded, infects somebody else,

  • he could be incubating it himself.

  • So when he came in, even though he felt fine,

  • he could be shedding it.

  • He could be starting to get COVID-19.

  • And it could be a couple of days before he had symptoms.

  • So imagine if you're somebody deciding

  • whether to be in close contact with somebody else.

  • Are you a vulnerable population?

  • Are you over a certain age?

  • Do you have an underlying medical condition?

  • I think the bottom line here as people

  • are looking to open up the country is this,

  • that one size doesn't fit all.

  • So there are certain parts of the country,

  • for example, Vermont, Montana, Alaska, where

  • there are relatively few cases, and people

  • can start very cautiously thinking about opening up.

  • But I think that's so important.

  • People shouldn't be intimidated to go online.

  • And literally, if you Google wherever you are in the country

  • right now, Google coronavirus and then

  • the name of your state, or the name of your county,

  • or whatever, there will be, likely, a map that

  • tells you in your neighborhood, in your area of the country,

  • what's going on.

  • So the devil is in the details.

  • We have to be really careful to not just open it up

  • all at once.

  • The problem with opening up all at once

  • is-- and a lot of the country still

  • has places where the cases are increasing.

  • But if we open it up all at once,

  • and it's the wrong time, Ellen, it could take a couple of weeks

  • before we realize it was the wrong time.

  • And by that time, people are going into the hospital

  • and getting sick.

  • So we have to think about everybody right now.

  • Long story short, it sounds like I'm not coming in today.

  • Yeah.

  • That's what it sounds like.

  • It sounds like you're not coming in today or anytime soon.

  • Thanks, Ellen.

  • No, thanks, Jon.