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  • You know our first guest from Scandal,

  • and her new show is so good.

  • It's called Little Fires Everywhere.

  • Please welcome Kerry Washington.

  • Hi.

  • Hello, my friend.

  • How are you?

  • How's your family?

  • Everybody's OK.

  • Thank God everybody's doing OK.

  • The kids are home and being home schooled.

  • And we're keeping distance from even my parents

  • who live close by.

  • But we're seeing them from afar.

  • We play six feet away from them in their front yard.

  • And yes, it is a really crazy time.

  • Now are you-- really the problem that everyone

  • is having is trying to help kids with their homework

  • because I guess everything has changed.

  • Like math has changed and--

  • I mean, I think math is the biggest problem, right?

  • Are you having that?

  • No because luckily, my kids are-- my littles are young.

  • They're still pretty young, so I'm

  • good with coming up with words that start with A. You know,

  • like if they were in AP trigonometry,

  • I would not be good.

  • But I'm super good at like, three plus seven is--

  • that I can do.

  • A ten.

  • Ten.

  • Ten.

  • Yes.

  • Andy and I got it.

  • Ten.

  • I got it first though, Andy.

  • All right.

  • You would get a sticker in my house.

  • Very good.

  • Aw.

  • I'm going to get a sticker for you, Andy.

  • You should start giving me stickers.

  • I actually like that.

  • I should give you a sticker.

  • And just in case you were wondering what that mop is,

  • that's Mary.

  • She can't be here, so I have Mary's head on a mop.

  • And then Andy is outside.

  • And then I'm just all alone with Portia in here.

  • She's my audience.

  • So now, listen.

  • I was told that you had a pajama party at home,

  • but wouldn't that just be every day?

  • Why is that a special day?

  • Well, so I'm trying to do meetings on Zoom

  • and maintain the operations of my company

  • and keep everybody employed.

  • So I have been trying to get dressed most days

  • and getting my kids dressed.

  • But they decided, because sometimes they

  • have pajama day at school, that they wanted

  • to have pajama day at home.

  • And I think everybody on my team was terrified

  • that I had given up on life because I was just showing up

  • to all my Zoom meetings in my jammies and acting like normal.

  • But I think we need to be doing more jammy days.

  • Like we should decide--

  • like the whole country or the world should decide

  • Mondays are jammy days.

  • Yes, but I don't know what Monday is.

  • I have no idea what day it is.

  • It doesn't matter.

  • I don't wear a watch anymore.

  • I have no idea.

  • But we should do a pajama day maybe next week

  • where we both wear pajamas.

  • OK, Andy.

  • I'll get a onesie.

  • I would love to see you in a onesie out there.

  • All right.

  • Speaking of pajamas,

  • Yes.

  • I saw a picture of you and Mariah Carey.

  • This was in an airport.

  • And is she wearing pajamas in an airport?

  • Yes.

  • She's wearing like couture pajamas.

  • I want to say this was pre social distancing, just

  • so everyone knows.

  • Because we're snuggled up super close.

  • I assumed that.

  • She was wearing couture jammies at LAX.

  • That was at the airport.

  • Well, somehow it doesn't surprise me.

  • It's Mariah Carey.

  • She can do anything.

  • And she's always ahead of the curve.

  • She's always groundbreaking.

  • She was doing jammies before any of us were publicly.

  • Right.

  • But not social distancing.

  • She was right next to you.

  • She was.

  • Thank God.

  • So she wasn't-- yes.

  • She wasn't ahead of the curve there.

  • So I saw you at the Golden Globes.

  • That's the last time I saw you.

  • [INAUDIBLE] amazing speech, which I loved.

  • Thank you.

  • Thank you.

  • Yes, it's so weird to think back when we could all

  • see each other, and be in a room and next to each other

  • at tables.

  • Someone reminded me that that was the last time I saw you

  • and that, I guess everyone was concerned for your outfit

  • that you were going to--

  • were you concerned for your outfit?

  • I felt confident.

  • I felt like I had enough top stick to keep things in place,

  • to keep the girls in place.

  • But I kept looking down at the tape.

  • And I had extra tape in my purse just in case it didn't work.

  • Right.

  • I was good.

  • Yes, but you had extra tape in your purse,

  • but what if it happens when you're on camera?

  • You can't just go like that and then stick a piece of tape

  • on your girls.

  • No, but I mean also my husband had an eye on it.

  • He kept checking me out as I was doing interviews to make sure

  • that they were good.

  • I felt like I had enough tools in my arsenal.

  • Yes.

  • So I want to talk about something that you've

  • been doing for a long time.

  • We're talking about how hard this whole thing is.

  • New York has been hit the hardest so far.

  • And I know that's your hometown.

  • And you have been helping hospitals for ten years.

  • This is something that you were involved in,

  • and now more than ever they need help.

  • But tell everyone what the organization is

  • and what you're doing.

  • No, I haven't.

  • I haven't been doing.

  • It's this organization, MedShare has been.

  • For ten years they've been helping underserved hospitals

  • all over the world.

  • And so they've been at the front lines of COVID

  • from when it first started.

  • And I was able to identify hospitals in the Bronx

  • that were underserved.

  • My hometown where I come from.

  • And contribute to masks and equipment

  • to help keep that hospital safe.

  • That's fantastic.

  • Yes.

  • I think people need to really grasp

  • that if we don't protect all of the brave men and women who

  • are going into the hospitals that are--

  • and even all the janitors and everyone cleaning.

  • But if we don't take care of these people,

  • we don't have a hospital.

  • We don't have anybody to take care of us.

  • Right.

  • Next week we're going to be announcing some more

  • work that we're doing with hospitals

  • in the Bronx with Columbia Presbyterian and that

  • sort of family of hospitals, so I'm excited about that.

  • But I think that no matter who you are,

  • I feel like it's an important time to remember that no matter

  • who you are, you can be giving whatever you have to give.

  • Right?

  • If you're a kid, you can make signs for nurses and doctors

  • to keep morale up because keeping everybody

  • in a state of feeling good while they're

  • doing this extraordinary work is so important.

  • I work with a teledentistry company called [INAUDIBLE]

  • that they've transformed their factories

  • and are no longer creating aligners,

  • but are creating ventilator parts and masks.

  • Whoever you are, whether it's money,

  • whether it's time, whether it's resources, texting a friend,

  • leaving a sign for your postal worker,

  • leaving an extra tip at the grocery store.

  • Everybody who can't stay home, this

  • is the time for us to do our part

  • and stay home to slow the spread of this virus,

  • but to thank the people who are out there who

  • aren't staying home for keeping the world running.

  • Exactly.

  • Exactly.

  • We're going to find the good in this,

  • and the good in it is people that can help

  • are helping in all the ways that you said.

  • We're going to take a break, and we're

  • going to talk about Little Fires Everywhere when we come back.

  • Woo.

  • She's mean.

  • We're back Kerry Washington.

  • That's a clip from Little Fires Everywhere.

  • It is so good, and everyone is watching it.

  • It's doing very well.

  • Tell everybody what it is about.

  • Well, Reese Witherspoon is so good.

  • It is a series starring she and I.

  • It's based on a brilliant New York Times best-seller book

  • called Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng.

  • And it's really about these two women who

  • could not be more different.

  • They are different socioeconomically,

  • and racially, and in their beliefs that how they mother.

  • And they're kind of thrust into each other's lives,

  • and their daughters each become obsessed with the other mother.

  • And that transforms their families forever.

  • So tWitch is a huge fan of the show,

  • and he has a question for you. tWitch, are you there?

  • Yes, I'm here.

  • I'm here.

  • Hi, tWitch.

  • Hi.

  • How are you doing?

  • How are you doing?

  • I'm excellent , all things considered

  • Amen.

  • But I just wanted to ask.

  • how did coming up in the 90s prepare you

  • to play a parent in the 90s?

  • It's such a good question.

  • So we were in a pre-production meeting, Reese Witherspoon

  • and I. We were talking about the costumes

  • with Lyn Paolo, who also did the costumes for Scandal.

  • She did these costumes, and we were

  • chatting about all the clothes that the teenagers wear.

  • And she was like, I had that skirt, and I had that shirt,

  • and I had those rollerblades.

  • And it hit us that like, oh, we're

  • actually playing our mothers in this series.

  • So it's been--

  • I don't know.

  • It's very meaningful for me to get to step back and try

  • to walk in my mother's shoes.

  • Love it.

  • Love it.

  • Yes, it's good.

  • It's good.

  • And then I know your dad was an extra on the show.

  • Well, please, please Ellen, we don't

  • say extra, particularly not when we're talking about my dad.

  • He's a background actor, and he was a featured background

  • actor.

  • [INAUDIBLE] have the appropriate level

  • of respect for his performance.

  • Well, when I call him extra, I mean he's extra.

  • Like he's not just regular.

  • He's extra.

  • That's what I mean.